39 episodes

The discipline of Comparative Literature is changing. Its Eurocentric heritage has been challenged by various formulations of ‘world literature’, while new media and new forms of artistic production are bringing urgency to comparative thinking across literature, film, the visual arts and music. The resulting questions of method are both intellectually compelling and central to the future of the humanities. To confront them, our research programme brings together experts from the disciplines of English, Medieval and Modern Languages, Oriental Studies, and Classics, and draws in collaborators from Music, Visual Art, Film, Philosophy and History.

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (OCCT‪)‬ Oxford University

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The discipline of Comparative Literature is changing. Its Eurocentric heritage has been challenged by various formulations of ‘world literature’, while new media and new forms of artistic production are bringing urgency to comparative thinking across literature, film, the visual arts and music. The resulting questions of method are both intellectually compelling and central to the future of the humanities. To confront them, our research programme brings together experts from the disciplines of English, Medieval and Modern Languages, Oriental Studies, and Classics, and draws in collaborators from Music, Visual Art, Film, Philosophy and History.

    Translation as Afterlife

    Translation as Afterlife

    In this seminar, Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan University) and Adriana X. Jacobs (Oriental Studies) will explore the possibility of translation as “afterlife” through a discussion of the Hebrew poets Orit Gidali and Hezy Leskly. Marcela Sulak’s talk is entitled “Translating Ghosts and Unborn Souls: When Love Poetry is Political”. Adriana X. Jacobs talk is “Hezy Leskly’s Zombie Memories”.

    • 47 min
    “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

    “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

    Looking specifically at Modern Greek, Polish, Dutch, and Swedish, this event interrogates what it means to translate and publish marginalised and minor European languages into English. Translations from French, German and Spanish (and more recently, non-European giants such as Arabic and Chinese) dominate the contemporary literary scene. Arranged in a “conversazione” format, four translators discuss what it means to assert and champion the forgotten voices of minor and marginalised European languages. With Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death
    Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford).

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Between Languages: Working in and out on Translation

    Between Languages: Working in and out on Translation

    With Adriana X. Jacobs (Professor of Modern Hebrew Literature), Kasia Szymanska (Junior Research Fellow in Slavonic Studies, University College), chaired by Kate Costello (DPhil candidate in Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature). In Michaelmas 2016 the OCCT Discussion Group will follow a new format: we’ll be focussing on key issues in the methodology of comparative study. The sessions will begin with a short conversation between two senior members moderated by a graduate representative, followed by a discussion of the recommended readings. We hope to encourage graduates to think about their research within a comparative context, and contribute to creating a vibrant OCCT graduate community.

    • 23 min
    Literature Beyond Literary Studies: Intermediality and Interdisciplinarity

    Literature Beyond Literary Studies: Intermediality and Interdisciplinarity

    With Professor Ben Morgan (Professor of German) and Peter Hill (Junior Research Fellow in Arabic Literature, Christ Church College), chaired by Karoline Watroba (DPhil candidate in German and Comparative Criticism).

    • 17 min
    Comparative Criticism: What Is It and Why Do We Do It?

    Comparative Criticism: What Is It and Why Do We Do It?

    Matthew Reynolds and Mohamed-Salah Omri discuss comparative literary criticism. Chaired by Valeria Taddei. Matthew Reynolds, Professor of English and Comparative Criticism, Mohamed-Salah Omri, Professor of Modern Arabic Language and Literature and Valeria Taddei, DPhil candidate in Italian and Comparative Literature.

    • 22 min
    Intercultural Literary Practices

    Intercultural Literary Practices

    Laura Lonsdale (Queen's College, Oxford): 'Barbarisms: Multilingualism and Modernity in Narratives of the Spanish- speaking World’. Respondent: Jane Hiddleston (French/Oxford)

    • 56 min

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