67 episodes

Researchers from across the scientific disciplines share the unpublished stories behind their recently published research, along with the background of their scientific discoveries.

Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves. Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.

    • Natural Sciences

Researchers from across the scientific disciplines share the unpublished stories behind their recently published research, along with the background of their scientific discoveries.

    Ivory Towers and Abattoirs – Temple Grandin

    Ivory Towers and Abattoirs – Temple Grandin

    How can research improve the lives of livestock, even as they're on their way to slaughter? In episode 67, Temple Grandin from the Colorado State University's College of Agricultural Sciences talks with us about her work on promoting improved communications between academic researchers and those in the animal agriculture industry.

    • 21 min
    Hiding in Plain Sight – Katherine Wood

    Hiding in Plain Sight – Katherine Wood

    Did you catch that? In episode 66, Katherine Wood from the University of Illinois discusses her research with the scientist behind the famous “Invisible Gorilla” experiments, Daniel Simons, into if and when people notice unexpected objects in inattentional blindness tasks

    • 33 min
    Transmitting Placebo Effects – Luke Chang

    Transmitting Placebo Effects – Luke Chang

    Can your doctors' beliefs about the efficacy of a treatment affect how you experience pain? In episode 65, we’re joined by Luke Chang from the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College. He talks with us about his research into socially transmitted placebo effects, through which patients can pick up on subtle facial cues that reveal their doctor's beliefs about how effective a treatment will be.

    • 29 min
    Global Decline of Homicide – Mateus Rennó Santos

    Global Decline of Homicide – Mateus Rennó Santos

    The global decline of births from 1990 and 2015 has to a reduction in the proportion of people aged 15-29. So might this explain why the world’s homicide rate has dropped by nearly 20%? In episode 64, we’re joined by Mateus Rennó Santos from the University of South Florida. He talks with us about his research into how an aging population is a driving force behind the decline in homicide that most countries across the globe have enjoyed for the past three decades.

    • 29 min
    Extraordinary Claims, Ordinary Evidence – Susan Gelman

    Extraordinary Claims, Ordinary Evidence – Susan Gelman

    Why are bold, broad, and terse depictions of science perceived as more important, robust and generalizable than nuanced ones? In episode 63, we're joined by Susan Gelman from the University of Michigan, who talks with us about her research into the use of generic language in scientific papers.

    • 30 min
    Ritual Pain for Social Gain – Dimitris Xygalatas

    Ritual Pain for Social Gain – Dimitris Xygalatas

    Sure, you might have a tongue piercing. But would you consider something far more extreme for a bump on the social ladder? In episode 62, we're joined by Dimitris Xygalatas from the University of Connecticut, who talks with us about how extravagant and painful rituals can foster greater subjective health and social standing.

    • 34 min

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