5 episodes

This second-year Cognitive Psychology course provides a broad introduction (in three lectures) to some key topics in the Psychology of visual attention; there is also one lecture providing a brief introduction to models of reading and acquired dyslexia...

PS2002 Cognitive Psychology 1 City, University of London

    • Social Sciences

This second-year Cognitive Psychology course provides a broad introduction (in three lectures) to some key topics in the Psychology of visual attention; there is also one lecture providing a brief introduction to models of reading and acquired dyslexia...

    • video
    Lecture 3 Part 2 - Visual Search

    Lecture 3 Part 2 - Visual Search

    You’re in the Psychology section looking for a book. You know it is big and red. How long will it take you to search for it? It probably depends on how many big books there are, and how many red books there are. If there are lots, your search might take a while. Why can’t just process all the books at the same time and home in immediately on just the one we want? The factors that make a ‘visual search’ task hard, or easy, reveal the functions and the limitations of our attention. This lecture will trace the history of visual search theories, and the clever solutions that each have proposed to explain the complexities of visual search behaviour, though not always very successfully.

    • 41 min
    • video
    Lecture 3 Part 1 - Visual Search

    Lecture 3 Part 1 - Visual Search

    You’re in the Psychology section looking for a book. You know it is big and red. How long will it take you to search for it? It probably depends on how many big books there are, and how many red books there are. If there are lots, your search might take a while. Why can’t just process all the books at the same time and home in immediately on just the one we want? The factors that make a ‘visual search’ task hard, or easy, reveal the functions and the limitations of our attention. This lecture will trace the history of visual search theories, and the clever solutions that each have proposed to explain the complexities of visual 
    search behaviour, though not always very successfully. 
     

    • 46 min
    • video
    Lecture 2 - Attention (Early, late and load)

    Lecture 2 - Attention (Early, late and load)

    It is a fair certainty that prior to reading these words you were not aware of the pressure of your feet on the floor, nor the space directly behind your head; and it is also very likely that now your attention has been directed to these things, you are.  From one moment to the next the whole world of your awareness changed – what happened? This series of three lectures will review the vast field of research in selective attention (mostly visual attention), touching on some of the classical controversies and the ingenious solutions that have been proposed. We will begin by considering the intuitive notion of selective attention as a filter, helping us to avoid information overload. What information is lost in attentional
    filtering, and what is preserved? The answer to this might depend on whether the filter operate early on just after sensory processing, or late after semantic analysis? Experimental evidence supports both possibilities!But one influential theory proposes that both may be right, depending on the current ‘cognitive load’.

    • 1 hr 37 min
    • video
    Lecture 1 Part 2 - Reading and Dyslexia

    Lecture 1 Part 2 - Reading and Dyslexia

    You are already an expert in reading. By the age of five you already knew up to 5000 words. By the end of your degree you will probably have read about 20 million words. But reading is not so easy for people who have dyslexia. And for 
    the brain, recognising and understanding words on a page is an immensely complex task. For example compare the words ‘Stalk’ and ‘Stork’: words with different spellings can have the same pronunciations, and vice versa; furthermore, same sounding words can have different meanings. This lecture is just the briefest introduction to the cognitive psychology of reading. We will learn about classical cognitive models of reading (specifically reading aloud), and explore the evidence for them from normal reading, and from the strange errors made by stroke victims suffering from acquired dyslexia. 

    • 38 min
    • video
    Lecture 1 Part 1 - Reading and Dyslexia

    Lecture 1 Part 1 - Reading and Dyslexia

    You are already an expert in reading. By the age of five you already knew up to 5000 words. By the end of your degree you will probably have read about 20 million words. But reading is not so easy for people who have dyslexia. And for the brain, recognising and understanding words on a page is an immensely complex task. For example compare the words ‘Stalk’ and ‘Stork’: words with different spellings can have the same pronunciations, and vice versa; furthermore, same sounding words can have different meanings. This lecture is just the briefest introduction to the cognitive psychology of reading. We will learn about classical cognitive models of reading (specifically reading aloud), and explore the evidence for them from normal reading, and from the strange errors made by stroke victims suffering from acquired dyslexia.

    • 51 min

Top Podcasts In Social Sciences

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by City, University of London