60 episodes

Speaking with people who are making the world a better place

At Purposely Podcast we amplify the stories of inspirational people from across the Globe, founders
and leader of nonprofits, charities, for purpose businesses as well social entrepreneurs. They are often inspired by their own experiences.

Join the Purposely team www.purposelypodcast.com

Purposely Podcast Mark Longbottom

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

Speaking with people who are making the world a better place

At Purposely Podcast we amplify the stories of inspirational people from across the Globe, founders
and leader of nonprofits, charities, for purpose businesses as well social entrepreneurs. They are often inspired by their own experiences.

Join the Purposely team www.purposelypodcast.com

    #59 Start-up fintech removing barriers to healthcare, Steven Zinsli founder HealthNow

    #59 Start-up fintech removing barriers to healthcare, Steven Zinsli founder HealthNow

    27 year old Steven Zinsli is the founder of Fintech start-up HealthNow, Steven joined Purposely to share his founder story and his vision for the future of his business. A company that combines a focus on making profit alongside purpose and social impact. You could say a new kind of company measuring success in different 'better world' ways. 

    Steven is incredibly focused, competitive and driven, he is also determined to improve people's health outcomes, he talks about his parents struggling to meet doctors bills when he was young and how access to credit (from the doctor) had played a key role in ensuring the family stayed healthy. 

    Steven is now using these traits to play active role in creating a world where healthcare is more accessible, more equitable and he is using tech to facilitate this change. He has thrown himself into the tech start-up world which he describes as challenging ... 'dog eat dog'!

    We also explore how an experience at school transformed his approach to work and life, from a student relying on natural intelligence to scrape through to what he has become... an overachiever hell bent on smashing every opportunity that comes his way. You will hear about his disciplined life sacrificing vices normal for most twenty somethings. Stevens early starts, long days and hours spent in the gym 'focused on his own health'. Don't worry I do push him on this.. 'surely you have some vices?...' 'do you like donuts?!'

    Steven started his journey in healthcare in 2016 as the first musculoskeletal podiatrist in what was a small New Zealand rehabilitation company, Physio Connect with less than 10 staff. He joined as a partner and over the next 5 years, Steven and a business partner grew the company to 108+ staff and 14 clinics seeing 4 thousand plus patients per week.

    This tangible experience provided Steven with an array of opportunities to... 'learn, gain scar tissue and meet some amazing people. It also gave me significant insight into customer challenges in the healthcare sector.'

    Earlier this year Steven secured pre-seed capital from what he describes as committed investors and partners. Steven and his team are now working tirelessly to make healthcare more accessible to the public through a Fintech solution that will move healthcare into the palm of your hand and make healthcare more accessible to more people.

    https://healthnow.co.nz/


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    • 32 min
    #58 Peer support saving lives, Simon Kitchen CEO of Bipolar UK

    #58 Peer support saving lives, Simon Kitchen CEO of Bipolar UK

    Simon Kitchen joined Purposely Podcast to share his story. Simon is the CEO of Bipolar UK having joined the organisation in 2018 during a difficult time for the charity when they lacked financial stability. 

    Simon is driven to help transforming the lives of the most vulnerable in society through voluntary action. He has a track record of influencing public policy, strategic development, building alliances to achieve social change and using co-production to drive service improvements.

    His previous roles include leading one of the largest co-production initiatives in adult social care at Leonard Cheshire Disability and running the social action movement at the Dementia Action Alliance. He has also held a number of policy and research roles in Whitehall and in the regions. He is passionate about peer support and giving people with bipolar greater choice and control over their lives. You will hear that he has a family connection to bipolar and a passion for supporting people who have limited options. 


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    • 19 min
    #57 Social enterprise turning gifts into positive impact, Christine Langdon co-founder The Good Registry

    #57 Social enterprise turning gifts into positive impact, Christine Langdon co-founder The Good Registry

    Christine Langdon joined Purposely Podcast to share her founder story with The Good Registry

    Christine is a social entrepreneur and communicator with a passion for having a positive impact for people and the planet. Co-founder and Chief of Good at The Good Registry, a community and website that is helping to make giving more simple, sustainable and kind.

    Christine has also taught yoga in prison and was once seconded to the New York Post to work as a journalist for an eventful time which included covering riots and celebrity gossip. Today she combines work on the registry with consultancy and she also writes a blog tracking her adventure from corporate life to social entrepreneurship at mykinderlife.org

    What's the vision and mission of the Good Registry?

    ‘The Good Registry, based in New Zealand, is a gift platform where people give charity donation gifts. In the past it's always been stuff we buy from shops and it hasn't always been stuff that people necessarily want, need or ever use. The Good Registry is about recognising people without having to buy them stuff. Instead the money is helping good causes, stopping waste and saving the environment.’

    Was it your idea? How did it come about?

    ‘It was my inspiration and four years ago (2017) I left my role as Community Manager at Z Energy and while I did not have an exact plan I knew that I wanted to create something that would have a positive social impact. The idea for The Good Registry came super quick and it was because I was doing a bit of decluttering in my house and come across things stashed in a drawer and under the stairs and I was thinking that I couldn't throw these things away because they were gifts and I just wished that I hadn't been given them at all so I didn't have to store them. I then had another birthday and received a few more things that I didn't want or need and at the same time I had been looking for ways that I could give to good causes and enable others to go to good causes as well. So the idea was conceived’

    Great ideas don't always become a reality, what gave you the impetus to launch?

    ‘A walk with one friend, Sue McCabe and lunch with another, Tracey Bridges presented me with my two co-founders as well as the momentum to get the site off the ground. They both loved the idea and were willing to get behind it. We also received a lot of encouragement and support from others and we just kept driving it forward. It was funny because I bumped into someone recently who had the same idea 14 years ago but they didn’t do anything to make it happen. I think we all have great ideas and it just takes someone to do something with the idea. We were also inspired to launch in time for Christmas and we managed to get the whole thing set up and going by November 2017’

    It's been a real success, however, have there been any pain points along the way?

    ‘I don’t regret a day I have given to The Good Registry and it has turned out really well, however, the 70 hour weeks I worked to get it launched were tough at the beginning. The website wasn’t great at the beginning and evolved over time to respond to people’s needs… we didn’t quite nail with the first version and if we'd had time to do more research and maybe some more money to get it perfect. That said… it may have stopped us getting it off the ground and just going for it is a good way to approach life.’






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    • 28 min
    #56 Transforming nonprofit Boards, Penny Wilson CEO of Getting on Board

    #56 Transforming nonprofit Boards, Penny Wilson CEO of Getting on Board

    Penny Wilson joined Purposely Podcast to share her story as CEO of Getting On Board a non-profit focused on supporting people from all sectors of society to become charity board trustees, and charities to recruit and retain a diverse range of trustees.
    Tell me about Getting On Board, what’s its mission?
    ‘Getting On Board is a really small charity based in Britain working to increase the accessibility and diversity of trustee non-profit boards… which are currently positively ‘victorian’ in their composition right across the sector. Two thirds of trustees are male, two thirds are over 50, 92% white and three quarters of trustees are from households above the national median household income. So as a body, our trustees are wealthier, ‘maler’, whiter, older than wider society and then we've got lots and lots of gaps for example… lived experience, so lived experience of the thing that a particular charity is seeking to tackle and Getting On Board works on that… important work that impacts on every single charity. ‘
    Trustees perform vital and important roles right?
    ‘Charity board members are the most senior leaders in our charities and unfortunately not enough care and attention is given to how we recruit trustees or thought put into who goes onto a board. In fact the most common way of becoming a trustee in the UK is to be asked to be one, however, this does not necessarily ensure the right people are recruited and it does not match how we recruit our employees. In comparison if we need an employee with certain skills we advertise for the person that matches that requirement we don’t just ask friends, family members ex colleagues etc. We need to start doing this when recruiting trustees especially when you consider the level of responsibility they have’
    How did the Getting On Board get started?
    ‘It was started in 2004, by Sarah Hodgkinson who sadly died a couple of years ago. At the time Sarah held a senior role in a big corporate and she recognized that there wasn't an easy path for senior professionals to step into charity board roles and she wanted to do something about it. I’m the CEO and I've been here for five years.  I had met Sarah a few times and heard her talking about trusteeship and I thought that sounds absolutely brilliant. I want a piece of that. So that’s how my voluntary trusteeship career took off and it also led me to taking this role with Getting On Board.’
    How is the charity set-up?
    ‘The first thing to say is that we are microscopically small with an annual income of just over 70,000 pounds but it is fair to say that we really punch above our weight and people are always really shocked when they find out how small we are both in terms of income and the size of the team. We've got three part time core team members. However, we've got like a really wide community of people who just think what we do is important and support us in lots of ways by amplifying our message.’
    A core part of what you do is training? What else do you do?
    ‘We work on both sides of the trustee thing, so we work with people who are potential trustees and then we work with charity leaders who want to know about diversifying their boards and about recruiting trustees professionally, we do this by providing free guidance. That said we primarily focus on training people in what it means to be a trustee, to serve as an effective trustee as well as how to find a role. On the other side of the coin we advise and train charities on how to diversify their boards and how to recruit trustees. It’s fair to say that most charities trustees have to be hands on because there is nobody else to do the work although the medium to larger organisations that have staff again can take more of a governance only approach’

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    • 26 min
    #55 Nonprofit saving lives in conflict zones, Mike Seawright Founder of ReliefAid

    #55 Nonprofit saving lives in conflict zones, Mike Seawright Founder of ReliefAid

    Mike Seawright joined Purposely Podcast to share his founder story with ReliefAid.

    Mike Seawright started ReliefAid because he was frustrated by the inability of many aid organisations to get staff and resources into conflict zones quickly and effectively. A decade prior Mike had switched careers from corporate consultant to aid worker and following his first experience in Sudan he has specialised in working in conflict situations.

    ReliefAid has gone on to become a respected international aid organisation that is saving lives and alleviating the suffering of people affected by conflict through independent and impartial humanitarian action. They work closely with other international aid partners including ShelterBox.

    What is the mission and vision of ReliefAid, the charity you’re founder and CEO of?

    ‘I'd been working in war zones for a number of years, and I realised from first-hand experience that not enough aid was getting into places like Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Afghanistan, the key conflict hot spots of the world. It was a kind of ‘aha moment’ a realisation that I could help families that no one else could help. Six years later we've supported over 210k people in conflict zones.’

    There are 80 million refugees worldwide and 50 million people displaced by conflict or war, can ReliefAid make enough of a difference?

    ‘The numbers are absolutely staggering and of course you can feel overwhelmed and that not enough can be done. One of the challenges we have when communicating with the New Zealand public and people around the world is stressing that while the numbers are big and the problem is huge, making a positive difference starts with helping one family. We can help people, who through no fault of their own, are forced from their homes by the effects of war and conflict.’

    So ReliefAid provides independent and impartial humanitarian action, why is that so important?

    ‘In a war zone the political parties and warring parties could perceive you to be part of the conflict itself. I have worked in Foreign Affairs as a Diplomat and during that time I could see aid decisions being made based on political and military objectives. We took a lesson from that and when we founded ReliefAid we knew we did not want to be at the mercy of a country's foreign policy. To that end we have had to stay clear of Government money and remain independent and neutral. We don't take sides in the conflict and our focus is on accessing people who need how help and support and the assessments made on the basis of need and not on the basis of political objectives.’

    www.reliefaid.org.nz


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    • 33 min
    #53 Reimagining the workplace, people and purpose, James Hurman founder Previously Unavailable

    #53 Reimagining the workplace, people and purpose, James Hurman founder Previously Unavailable

    James Hurman joined Purposely Podcast to share his founder story with Previously Unavailable. A creative agency he launched in 2014 that focuses on delivering success for clients as well as a first class experience for employees. A new kind of workplace that evolves to match the needs of the employees at different life stages and an environment that means the team can be the very best version of themselves. Launching his agency followed a career as a strategic planner at Auckland ad agency Colenso BBDO. He has since led innovation and venture projects across fintech, energy, telecommunications, health, food, beverages, public sector, media, hospitality and professional services. James is also the author of The Case for Creativity, a book about the link between creativity and business success, described as "beautiful words of wisdom’.

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    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

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Charity Founders’ Motivations unravelled

What a fantastic series looking at how these awesome charity founders used their personal experiences to bring real change to thousands. Brilliant interviewing.

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Purposely podcast

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Fab new podcast

A great insight into the charity sector.

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