8 min

Retroactive Jealousy on BBC News: The FULL Story The Zachary Stockill Podcast

    • Self Help

In today’s video, I’m going to talk about what it’s like to share the most embarrassing episode of your life on the front page of one of the biggest news publications on the planet.







Read or watch the video below to know about my personal experience with retroactive jealousy on the first page of BBC News.



















Zachary Stockill: In today’s video, I’m going to talk about what it’s like to talk about the most embarrassing episode of your life on the front page of one of the biggest news publications in the world. 







Back in 2018, I received an email from a journalist at BBC News. Most of you probably know, but BBC News is probably the biggest media organization in the United Kingdom, with enormous reach all over the world. BBC World News was always a constant for me on my travels, whatever hotel room I was in. All over the world, you can usually find BBC News. 







A BBC journalist wrote to me asking me if I’d be willing to go on the record and talk to her about my experience of retroactive jealousy as a younger man.







Retroactive jealousy is one of the most painful and frustrating experiences that any human being can go through. 















For most of the people reading this or watching this video, I’m sure you probably know that retroactive jealousy refers to unwanted intrusive thoughts, often obsessive curiosity, and what I call “mental movies” about a partner’s past relationships and or sexual history. The short version is: it is hell.







And back in 2018, it had been, I think, four or maybe five years, I think, since I’d had been talking about retroactive jealousy publicly. I’ve been doing this for a while. But I’d never put myself out there to such an extent that it was very likely that my grandparents and my friends from high school and all these people from my life would know about my own struggles with retroactive jealousy as a younger man.







Frankly, I’ve always been very proud of the work that I do. I love my job, I love what I do. And I’ll proclaim that from the rooftops. But back in 2018 at least, I was still a little bit embarrassed, really, to talk about this issue publicly. Because a lot of the ways that I used to behave and act out and feel back in 2018, were still embarrassing for me.







I’m a pretty confident guy, I’m a pretty proud person. But talking about the most embarrassing episode of your life on the front page of BBC News was, at first, a bit of a daunting prospect for me. 







But I got over it. I did the interview with a journalist who did a great job. And I wrote this article in conjunction with her that was published on the front page of BBC News. So I woke up one morning, and I literally saw retroactive jealousy on the front page of my BBC News app. Some people have asked me, what was that like? And It was fascinating because my website absolutely blew up that day. I got all kinds of emails and interests. And the overriding message I got from so many people was a message of gratitude, thanking me for talking about this issue publicly. 







People had been living with this issue for 10, 20, and 30 years before they read about it on BBC News. They recognized their story in my story. Many people,

In today’s video, I’m going to talk about what it’s like to share the most embarrassing episode of your life on the front page of one of the biggest news publications on the planet.







Read or watch the video below to know about my personal experience with retroactive jealousy on the first page of BBC News.



















Zachary Stockill: In today’s video, I’m going to talk about what it’s like to talk about the most embarrassing episode of your life on the front page of one of the biggest news publications in the world. 







Back in 2018, I received an email from a journalist at BBC News. Most of you probably know, but BBC News is probably the biggest media organization in the United Kingdom, with enormous reach all over the world. BBC World News was always a constant for me on my travels, whatever hotel room I was in. All over the world, you can usually find BBC News. 







A BBC journalist wrote to me asking me if I’d be willing to go on the record and talk to her about my experience of retroactive jealousy as a younger man.







Retroactive jealousy is one of the most painful and frustrating experiences that any human being can go through. 















For most of the people reading this or watching this video, I’m sure you probably know that retroactive jealousy refers to unwanted intrusive thoughts, often obsessive curiosity, and what I call “mental movies” about a partner’s past relationships and or sexual history. The short version is: it is hell.







And back in 2018, it had been, I think, four or maybe five years, I think, since I’d had been talking about retroactive jealousy publicly. I’ve been doing this for a while. But I’d never put myself out there to such an extent that it was very likely that my grandparents and my friends from high school and all these people from my life would know about my own struggles with retroactive jealousy as a younger man.







Frankly, I’ve always been very proud of the work that I do. I love my job, I love what I do. And I’ll proclaim that from the rooftops. But back in 2018 at least, I was still a little bit embarrassed, really, to talk about this issue publicly. Because a lot of the ways that I used to behave and act out and feel back in 2018, were still embarrassing for me.







I’m a pretty confident guy, I’m a pretty proud person. But talking about the most embarrassing episode of your life on the front page of BBC News was, at first, a bit of a daunting prospect for me. 







But I got over it. I did the interview with a journalist who did a great job. And I wrote this article in conjunction with her that was published on the front page of BBC News. So I woke up one morning, and I literally saw retroactive jealousy on the front page of my BBC News app. Some people have asked me, what was that like? And It was fascinating because my website absolutely blew up that day. I got all kinds of emails and interests. And the overriding message I got from so many people was a message of gratitude, thanking me for talking about this issue publicly. 







People had been living with this issue for 10, 20, and 30 years before they read about it on BBC News. They recognized their story in my story. Many people,

8 min