100 episodes

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care.

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care SAGE Publications Ltd.

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care.

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

    Integrating lived experiences of out-of-hours health services for people with palliative and end-of-life care needs with national datasets for people dying in Scotland in 2016

    Integrating lived experiences of out-of-hours health services for people with palliative and end-of-life care needs with national datasets for people dying in Scotland in 2016

    This episode features Professor Scott Murray (Primary Palliative Care Research Group, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK).

    People living at home with advanced progressive illness require well-coordinated services at all times of the day and night. Early identification for generalist palliative care support and care planning in the community can improve outcomes but requires effective information sharing across services. People with palliative care needs are high users of unscheduled care in the last months of life.

    People dying with advanced organ failure accessed unscheduled community health services less often than people with cancer or frailty. The organisation of unscheduled healthcare services is poorly understood, and current care pathways could be used more effectively in line with patient preferences. Early identification and care planning in primary care of those requiring palliative care informs and enhances their urgent and emergency care.

    Better resourcing of unscheduled community services for people identified for palliative care support in the community will provide safer, more responsive, and cost-effective care. Rapid access to unscheduled care via effective NHS telephone services and out-of-hours primary care assessment can reduce unwarranted ambulance calls, attendances at emergency departments and hospital admissions. Public education should encourage and support patients and carers living with advanced illness to access the unscheduled care best suited to their needs. Routine clinical datasets for most NHS unscheduled care services lack a variable to record patients in the community identified for palliative care.

    Full paper available from: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/02692163211066256

    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 4 min
    Is trained communication about desire to die harmful for patients receiving palliative care? A cohort study

    Is trained communication about desire to die harmful for patients receiving palliative care? A cohort study

    This episode features Professor Raymond Voltz, Kathleen Boström and Dr Kerstin Kremeike (Department of Palliative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

    Patients in palliative care frequently express a desire to die that rarely leads to a request for medical aid in dying. Fearing to cause harm, health professionals report uncertainty regarding proactively approaching the topic with their patients. Suicidology research suggests that there is no iatrogenic risk in asking about suicidality, but it remains unclear whether this analogy holds for non-psychiatric palliative patients with or without a desire to die.

    Independent of age, gender, diagnoses, and current desire to die, open conversations about desire to die through trained health professionals do not harm palliative patients. Desire to die conversations might lead to an at least temporary improvement in patients with medium to severe depression.

    Health professionals can feel encouraged to promote an open and respectful atmosphere of conversation about existential issues at the end of life including possible desire to die.

    • 4 min
    Death doulas as supportive companions in end-of-life care: A scoping review

    Death doulas as supportive companions in end-of-life care: A scoping review

    This episode features Si Qi Yoong (National University of Singapore, Singapore).

    Death doula is a relatively new role found in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. Death doulas provide support to the dying and their families. There is uncertainty about its roles, scope of practice, regulation and position within the healthcare system.

    This review clarifies the uncertainty of the death doula movement in terms of its roles, impacts of care and regulation issues. This review identifies five common roles death doulas undertake when providing non-clinical care to support the dying and their families. The review highlights a lack of experimental research to examine the actual effects of death doulas among the dying and their families and echoes a paucity of professional regulations over its training process and practice.

    Death doulas could be a valuable addition to existing end-of-life care services by alleviating the healthcare system’s time and resource constraints. A need exists for future research to investigate its actual effect among the dying and their families. The lack of regulation of death doulas may imply a lack of acknowledgement of this role, calling for more efforts from diverse stakeholders. A better understanding of this newly emerged care model could pave the way for its recognition and integration into existing healthcare and social care systems.

    • 3 min
    Podcast 97: Revised Recommendations on Standards and Norms for Palliative Care in Europe from the European Association for Palliative Care: a Delphi study

    Podcast 97: Revised Recommendations on Standards and Norms for Palliative Care in Europe from the European Association for Palliative Care: a Delphi study

    The EAPC published recommendations on standards and norms in palliative care for Europe in 2009. The Delphi technique is a well recognised way to elicit the views of stakeholders and obtain consensus. There are a diversity of international and national definitions and concepts in palliative care which makes comparison between countries and delivery of health care complex.

    The majority (122) of standards and norms in five domains (definitions of palliative care, philosophy, levels, delivery, services) in palliative care in Europe have remained unchanged over the last decade. 13 new standards and norms reached consensus, relating to emerging specialisms such as neonatal, geriatric and dementia palliative care, and recommendations for better access to national information sources and the use of digital health records.

    New recommendations recognise that there are emerging subspecialisations in palliative care in the fields of neonatal paediatrics and geriatric medicine indicating that care extends across the lifespan. New recommendations also have implications for service quality improvements including enhancing open visiting, availability of essential medicines, better information exchange, including digital medical records and access to specialist equipment.

    Future research and clinical care needs to include multiple domains to assess quality improvements in palliative care.

    Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/02692163221074547

    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 4 min
    A feasibility and acceptability pilot for the longitudinal measurement of inspiratory and expiratory pressures in people with advanced pancreatic cancer

    A feasibility and acceptability pilot for the longitudinal measurement of inspiratory and expiratory pressures in people with advanced pancreatic cancer

    This episode features Dr Diana Ferreira (Research Fellow at University of Wollongong, Australia).
    Breathlessness is frequently experienced in people with advanced cancer especially in the last days or weeks of life.
    Although cross-sectional studies have been done, longitudinal data on changes in maximum inspiratory pressure reflecting muscle strength are lacking.

    This pilot study aims to evaluate the feasibility of measuring changes in sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP; a measure of inspiratory muscle strength which is non-invasive and relatively reproducible) longitudinally in people with advanced cancer that was likely to progress in the time period of the study and who had no documented cardio-respiratory disease in order to better understand changes in breathlessness at the end of life.

    The study was acceptable to participants (and, by implications the clinical teams who referred them) and feasible, given the recruitment rate. All of the measures used would be of value in a subsequent larger cohort study.

    • 4 min
    Integrating lived experiences of out-of-hours health services for people with palliative and end-of-life care needs with national datasets for people dying in Scotland in 2016: a mixed methods, multi-stage design

    Integrating lived experiences of out-of-hours health services for people with palliative and end-of-life care needs with national datasets for people dying in Scotland in 2016: a mixed methods, multi-stage design

    This episode features Professor Scott Murray (Primary Palliative Care Research Group, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK).

    People living at home with advanced progressive illness require well-coordinated services at all times of the day and night. Early identification for generalist palliative care support and care planning in the community can improve outcomes but requires effective information sharing across services. People with palliative care needs are high users of unscheduled care in the last months of life.

    People dying with advanced organ failure accessed unscheduled community health services less often than people with cancer or frailty. The organisation of unscheduled healthcare services is poorly understood, and current care pathways could be used more effectively in line with patient preferences. Early identification and care planning in primary care of those requiring palliative care informs and enhances their urgent and emergency care

    Better resourcing of unscheduled community services for people identified for palliative care support in the community will provide safer, more responsive, and cost-effective care. Rapid access to unscheduled care via effective NHS telephone services and out-of-hours primary care assessment can reduce unwarranted ambulance calls, attendances at emergency departments and hospital admissions. Public education should encourage and support patients and carers living with advanced illness to access the unscheduled care best suited to their needs. Routine clinical datasets for most NHS unscheduled care services lack a variable to record patients in the community identified for palliative care.

    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Science

BBC Radio 4
Jordan Harbinger
BBC Radio 4
Hidden Brain
Vox
BBC Radio 4