100 episodes

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care.

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care SAGE Publications Ltd.

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care.

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

    Support from healthcare professionals in empowering family carers to discuss advance care planning: A population-based survey

    Support from healthcare professionals in empowering family carers to discuss advance care planning: A population-based survey

    This episode features Isabel Vandenbogaerde (End-of-life Care Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) & Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium).

    What is already known about the topic:
    Involvement of family carers in advance care planning conversations is crucial for end-of-life decision-making. Family carers are willing to engage in advance care planning conversations, but experience barriers in doing so. Healthcare professionals may play an important role in supporting family carers in these advance care planning conversations.
    What this paper adds:
    About half of the family carers have an advance care planning conversation with their relative in the final 3 months of life. Family carers were more likely to engage in advance care planning in case they were 55 of age or younger, had a medical degree (e.g. nurse or doctor), and when specialist palliative care services were involved The majority of family carers received advance care planning conversation support from a healthcare professional by performing the advance care planning conversation together.
    Implications for practice, theory or policy:
    Healthcare professionals can play an important role in introducing tools, website or information campaigns of advance care planning. Healthcare professionals may consider strategies to support and empower family carers to conduct advance care planning conversations outside the clinical context.
    Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/02692163221135032


    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 4 min
    End-of-life communication strategies for healthcare professionals: A scoping review

    End-of-life communication strategies for healthcare professionals: A scoping review

    This episode features Dr Joyce Chung and Weilin Chen (School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China).

    What is already known about the topic:
    End-of-life communication can improve patients’ quality of life, ease the bereavement experience, raise care satisfaction and reduce the utilisation of aggressive and expensive medical care. Healthcare professionals’ perceived barriers, such as fear of causing distress, impede the delivery of end-of-life conversations in a professional, sensitive and appropriate manner. The communication strategies available to healthcare professionals for discussing end-of-life issues with terminally ill patients and their families have not yet been systematically summarised.
    What this paper adds:
    This review systematically examines, summarises and presents recommended end-of-life communication strategies for healthcare professionals. It organises these communication strategies into seven themes that should be considered when delivering end-of-life conversations. This review highlights that further research is needed to explore patients’ and families’ perspectives on healthcare professionals’ end-of-life communication strategies; and available strategies in non-Anglo-Saxon countries.
    Implications for practice, theory or policy:
    The valuable strategies outlined in this review will assist and support healthcare professionals when having end-of-life conversations with their patients. Further training and education plans should be developed and implemented based on the study findings. Further research is needed to explore patients’ and their families’ experiences and views on end-of-life communication strategies used by healthcare professionals; and practical strategies to use in non-Anglo-Saxon countries.
    Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/02692163221133670

    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 4 min
    Serious health-related suffering experienced by children with disability and their families living in Bangladesh: A scoping review

    Serious health-related suffering experienced by children with disability and their families living in Bangladesh: A scoping review

    This episode features Suzanne Smith (Master of Palliative Care student, Flinders University, Australia; Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation Service, Australia), Dr Megan Doherty (University of Ottawa, ON, Canada; Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada) and Dr Mostofa Kamal Chowdhury  (BangabandhuSheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh).

    What is already known about the topic:
    The majority of children who need, but cannot access essential palliative care and pain relief, live in low-and middle-income countries. An estimated 10 million Bangladeshi children live with a disability and associated serious health-related suffering that may lead to premature death. Children from low- and middle-income countries are underrepresented or absent from existing palliative care reviews.
    What this paper adds:
    This review illuminates the extreme health-related suffering experienced by children with disability and their families in Bangladesh in the physical, social, and emotional/spiritual domains. Financial hardship, stigma, limited knowledge and compromised children’s rights impede access to healthcare in Bangladesh. Children with disability living in an urban marginalised society and Rohingya children with disability living in refugee camps in Bangladesh may receive care commensurate with the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care revised definition of palliative care
    Implications for practice, theory or policy:
    This review identifies innovative and novel models of effective service delivery, outside of mainstream healthcare settings, which combine both palliative care and rehabilitation principles. Further strengthening Child Rights in Bangladesh will reduce serious health-related suffering. Collaborations between Bangladeshi and International researchers are productive and should continue to inform future service development.
    Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/02692163221136896


    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 7 min
    Addressing inequity in palliative care provision for older people living with multimorbidity. Perspectives of community-dwelling older people on their palliative care needs: A scoping review

    Addressing inequity in palliative care provision for older people living with multimorbidity. Perspectives of community-dwelling older people on their palliative care needs: A scoping review

    This episode features Dr Richard Green (University of Surrey, Guildford, UK).

    Multimorbidity is increasing substantially worldwide, is associated with greater use of healthcare services, lower quality and quantity of life, and rises with age. Older people with multimorbidity are expected to become the main recipients of palliative care in the coming decades; however, there is limited evidence of their specific needs. Older people’s voices are vital to understanding their own palliative care needs and priorities, but these voices are hampered by structural inequities in service provision.

    This is the first paper reporting on the expressed palliative care needs of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity.
    The most common palliative care needs identified across need domains were pain, function, unhappiness, staying socially connected, future planning, person-centred care and having meaning and purpose in life. This paper highlights different priorities between the reported items in tools used to collect palliative care need and needs expressed by older people with multimorbidity.

    Further evidence is required to understand need to support service changes required to provide accessible, person-centred care to this underserved population.
    Multidimensional palliative care tools require refining to encompass complexity beyond the standard domains of palliative care. Community palliative care provision should involve the integration of care across sectors and recognise the diversity of needs across the continuum of living and dying well for older people with multimorbidity

    Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/02692163221118230

    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk


    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 3 min
    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in cancer pain: A database analysis to determine recruitment feasibility for a clinical trial

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in cancer pain: A database analysis to determine recruitment feasibility for a clinical trial

    This episode features Dr Andrew Page (Academic Unit of Palliative Care, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK).
    Cancer pain is common, extremely debilitating, and undertreated worldwide. We do not know if non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aka NSAIDs or “anti-inflammatories”) are effective in managing cancer pain of any type. To further scientific understanding, UK palliative care doctors advocate a pragmatic trial to determine the role, if any, of NSAIDs as opioid adjuncts for treating cancer-induced bone pain.

    Numbers treated for cancer-induced bone pain at a single regional radiotherapy centre (478 per year) support the feasibility of trial recruitment. Considering eGFR and contraindicating co-morbidities, two-thirds could be suitable for NSAID prescription if proven efficacious. Suitability for NSAID prescription reduces with age, with the proportion unsuitable increasing in those over 65 years old.

    Recruitment to a future trial of NSAIDs in the management of cancer-induced bone pain appears feasible, particularly if multiple recruitment centres are used. Demonstrating feasibility allows the planning of a definitive clinical trial to determine the efficacy of NSAIDs in this patient group. Without a definitive clinical trial, the question remains: are effective analgesics being underutilised in cancer pain management, or are ineffective medications increasing the risk of side effects in an already co-morbid cancer population?

    Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/02692163221122263

    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
    a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 4 min
    Bereavement outcomes in family members of those who died in acute care hospitals before and during the first wave of COVID-19: A cohort study

    Bereavement outcomes in family members of those who died in acute care hospitals before and during the first wave of COVID-19: A cohort study

    This episode features Dr James Downar (University of Ottawa, Canada).

    Early studies in the COVID-19 pandemic have suggested a high prevalence of severe grief symptoms, although most have used convenience or survey sampling methods which may bias the results, and most have assessed symptoms before pathological grief can be diagnosed (Full paper available from:    
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/02692163221109711
    If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

    • 4 min

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