294 episodes

Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

Science for the People Rachelle Saunders, Bethany Brookshire, Anika Hazra, & Marion Kilgour

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 13 Ratings

Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

    #584 Time for the Gory Details

    #584 Time for the Gory Details

    There are lots of things about the natural world many people like to avoid, or even pretend don't exist. Like the mites that are the same size and shape as the pores on our faces, or how likely it is that your dog will eat you when you die. Luckily, some people don't want to avoid those topics, and this week we're here with one of them. Host Bethany Brookshire talks with Erika Engelhaupt about her new book "Gory Details: Adventures in the Dark Side of Science".

    • 1 hr
    #583 The Unavoidable Complexities of Food

    #583 The Unavoidable Complexities of Food

    We can definitely agree there is a lot about our current food systems that isn't sustainable. But what's harder to agree on is what we need to do to fix it for the better, while still ensuring everyone on the planet has enough to eat. Everyone has an opinion about what food we should eat and what food we shouldn't, what food systems are harmful and which are sustainable... but those opinions are often at odds. Why are we so passionate about what we eat and how that food gets to our plates? Host Rachelle Saunders talks with development chef...

    • 1 hr
    #582 Cities Lost and Found

    #582 Cities Lost and Found

    What do ancient cities have to tell us about ourselves and our future? Annalee Newitz talks about their latest book, "Four Lost Cities: A Secret History of the Urban Age", and what ancient ruins can tell us about our modern selves. From Catalhoyuk to Cahokia, join us on a tour of cities past.

    • 1 hr
    #581 The Art and Science of Play

    #581 The Art and Science of Play

    For humans and creatures of all sorts, play goes beyond having fun. Cognitive scientist Junyi Chu shares about the motives behind play, from showing off one's fitness to practicing skills, and she shares about her research studying children, play and cognition. Game designer Holly Gramazio comes at play from the perspective of an artist. She talks about how games, such as Pokemon Go or others that originated during the pandemic, can change how players perceive a place and connect to other people.
    Related link:

    Play, Curiosity, and Cognition by Junyi Chu and Laura E. Schulz

    • 1 hr
    #580 So Long 2020, We Won't Miss You

    #580 So Long 2020, We Won't Miss You

    2020 is over, and honestly? Good riddance. But before we go, let's take a look back. Because 2020 was tough, but it was also a year that science played a bigger role in people's lives than ever before. Hosts Bethany Brookshire and Rachelle Saunders talk with Tina Saey, Deja Perkins, and Carolyn Gramling about three big science stories that definitely made an impact on 2020. Related links: The science stories that defined 2020: coronavirus, diveristy movements and more As 202 comes to an end, here's what we still don't know about COVID-19 This COVID-19 pandemic timeline shows how fast the...

    • 1 hr
    #579 It's a Pandemic, Why Are We So Bored?!

    #579 It's a Pandemic, Why Are We So Bored?!

    It's the holidays and it's 2020. For many of us, it's the first time we won't be able to be together, doing the traditional things we always do. It seems like it might be okay, I mean, people are always telling us to make our own traditions. So why does it hurt so much? Why does the loss of our rituals leave us so adrift? And why, with all the pressure of the pandemic and joblessness and politics are any of us bored? Bethany Brookshire speaks with Science News social sciences writer Sujata Gupta about the importance of rituals, and...

    • 1 hr

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

Wally McChomper ,

Great show

Keep up the good work guys!

TreyRoque ,

Not Skeptical, But Scientific

It's worth notching the difference between science and skepticism. The two aren't synonymous.

This podcast does really well on science, but has little of skeptical value. Pretty good guests, but for the occasional wingnut, who doesn't get challenged.

CheekySniper ,

Excellent

always interesting and funny.

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