61 episodes

In depth and personal interviews from the leading characters of Sailing's diverse competitive arena, hosted by the sport's leading media personality, double Olympic gold medallist, Shirley Robertson. From inside the closed doors of the America's Cup, to the pressures and excitement of the Olympic race course, the danger and jeopardy of racing non-stop around the planet to the ultimate quest for the world's fastest sailing boat, Shirley Robertson sits down and talks all things sailing with the brightest lights in the sport.

Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast Shirley Robertson

    • Sports
    • 4.9 • 188 Ratings

In depth and personal interviews from the leading characters of Sailing's diverse competitive arena, hosted by the sport's leading media personality, double Olympic gold medallist, Shirley Robertson. From inside the closed doors of the America's Cup, to the pressures and excitement of the Olympic race course, the danger and jeopardy of racing non-stop around the planet to the ultimate quest for the world's fastest sailing boat, Shirley Robertson sits down and talks all things sailing with the brightest lights in the sport.

    Season 3 - Ep21 - AC37 Barcelona Part2

    Season 3 - Ep21 - AC37 Barcelona Part2

    With the much awaited announcement that the 37th America's Cup will be held in the Spanish city of Barcelona, Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast this month features interviews with several of the Cup's key stakeholders, as they discuss the excitement behind this landmark decision.

    In Part One of this two part podcast, Robertson talks to Emirates Team New Zealand CEO Grant Dalton, who was excited to name the Spanish city as the winning venue in a tender process that included three other significantly attractive bids, before talking to American Magic team principal Terry Hutchinson.

    In this, Part 2 of the two part podcast, Robertson talks to Sir Ben Ainslie, team principal from INEOS Britannia, the official Challenger of Record (COR) representing the Royal Yacht Squadron.  Ainslie is excited that the Cup will be making a rare appearance in Europe, but is excited for global sailing fans that the Cup is to be held in such an iconic destination.  Ainslie is spearheading a campaign that sees a British Challenger of Record for the first time in over fifty years, and he's confident that now the venue has been announced, his team can proceed with few distractions.  Talking about their position as COR Ainslie tells Robertson...:

    "Some people would say it's potentially a distraction...but so far it's been a really productive process...and of course so far the venue decision, I don't think you could ask for a better venue anywhere in the world, the protocol, I think is a really positive progressive protocol as is the development of the Class Rule, so I'd like to think we've done an OK job so far."

    Ainslie appears in the second part of this two part podcast, along with Robertson's fellow AC36 broadcast commentator,  Ken Read from North Sails, who shares his thoughts on the announcement, before the podcast is wrapped up by Emirates Team New Zealand's Kevin Shoebridge.  As team COO, Shoebridge discusses the impact of the announcement on the sailing team, the opportunities that this decision will bring, and the implications of a defence on waters far from home.

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Season 3 - Ep21 - AC37 Barcelona Part1

    Season 3 - Ep21 - AC37 Barcelona Part1

    With the much awaited announcement that the 37th America's Cup will be held in the Spanish city of Barcelona, Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast this month features interviews with several of the Cup's key stakeholders, as they discuss the excitement behind this landmark decision.

    It's been just over a year since Emirates Team New Zealand successfully defended the Cup on home waters in Auckland, and following a rigorous and in depth selection process, Emirates Team New Zealand CEO Grant Dalton was excited to name the Spanish city as the winning venue in a tender process that included three other significantly attractive bids.

    Dalton kicks off the podcast with a discussion about the process itself, highlighting what it was about Barcelona's bid that saw them come out on top, before inevitably discussing the complicated decision to hold the Cup away from Auckland.  In the one hundred and seventy years of America's Cup history, a defence away from home waters is a significant rarity, in fact only once, in 2017 (Oracle Team USA defending in Bermuda) has this decision been made without geography being a determining factor (2007 and 2010 saw Swiss team Alinghi defend in Valencia due to lack of open ocean at home in Switzerland).  The decision has faced significant criticism at home in New Zealand but Dalton's chat with Robertson is very clear - without securing the financial security for the sailing team, a viable defence against such a strong group of Challengers is an impossibility...:

    "The team will always be the priority...in saying that though, we want an absolutely amazing event, we're the Defender, we have a responsibility to that, but the team will always be the priority, and so we can't take money out of the equation...and the original motive was to put the team in it's best financial position to be able to have a chance against amazingly strong teams coming at us, to three-peat." clarifies Dalton.

    Robertson discusses several aspects of the decision process with Dalton, as the pair discuss the responsibility of the Defender to continue the legacy of the world's oldest international sporting trophy.

    Robertson, who herself sailed the first of her four Olympic regattas for Team GB at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, talks to several other key stakeholders in the 37th America's Cup, including podcast regular Terry Hutchinson,  team principal of American Magic, the Challenger representing the original holder of the trophy, the New York Yacht Club.  Hutchinson and his American team are delighted with the venue announcement,  and he does not underestimate the significance of the Defender's decision...:

    "The Defenders have taken an aggressive decision...and as a competitor you can't overlook that, and so I'm excited by the opportunity, I also recognise all the teams are really really good, so we know how this game goes, we lived it to the nth degree in the last one so I'm excited by the opportunity in front of us."

    In the second part of this two part podcast Robertson talks to team principal of the official Challenger of Record, INEOS Britannia's Sir Ben Ainslie, before discussing the implications of the announcement with North Sails President Kenny Read.  Part 2 wraps up with a chat with Emirates Team New Zealand's COO Kevin Shoebridge, who discusses the implications of the announcement on the New Zealand sailing team, and the opportunities it brings.
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 53 min
    Series 3 - Ep20 - Jason Carrington Part 2

    Series 3 - Ep20 - Jason Carrington Part 2

    Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast this month features one of the most respected names in boat building, as Jason Carrington takes to the mic to discuss his phenomenal career in the sport.  Carrington has been at the forefront of high performance boat building for several decades, and in this, Part 2 of his chat with Robertson, much of the discussion relates to his work inside the boat shed as he builds some of the world's fastest racing machines.

    This Episode begins with the discussion around Carrington's final Volvo Ocean Race, onboard "Ericsson", one of the first Volvo 70s, again built under the watchful eye of Carrington, before the chat turns to life in the boat yard and the formation in 2017 of the now world renowned Carrington Boats.

    Based in Hythe, on the UK's south coast, Carrington Boats have recently been responsible for the build of some of sailing's most talked about race machines, most notably the latest iteration of Alex Thomson's "Hugo Boss" and Ben Ainslie's 2021 America's Cup AC75 "Britannia".  Carrington talks passionately about the difficulties of building foiling yachts at the very cutting edge of the sport, and does not shy away from the responsibilities that such complex projects bring.  Carrington's interview reveals a modest character, keen to remind Robertson that the men and women of the boat shed are often the unsung heroes of a successful campaign...:

    "There's building boats and there's building boats, but these type of boats, you've got to be very good at what you do, they're not in the spotlight, but they should be really."

    Robertson's two part podcast with Jason Carrington is a fascinating glimpse into the career of a man that has played a pivotal role in the progression of the sport of sailing, and reveals a passionate character driven by a very obvious and deep rooted love of the sport of competitive yacht racing.

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Series 3 - Ep19 - Jason Carrington Part 1

    Series 3 - Ep19 - Jason Carrington Part 1

    Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast this month features one of the most respected names in boat building, as Jason Carrington takes to the mic to discuss his phenomenal career in the sport.  Carrington has been at the forefront of high performance boat building for several decades, but as his chat with Robertson reveals, his achievements in the boat shed are more than matched by an impressive career offshore.

    In this two part edition, Part 1 sees Carrington reveal how a childhood spent on the water in Lymington (UK) led to an apprenticeship at the groundbreaking Green Marine, under the tutelage of the pioneering Bill Green himself.  It wasn't long before Carrington was impressing as a bowman, and was soon setting off on his first Whitbread attempt on the 1993/94 "Fortuna" campaign with British Whitbread stalwart Lawrie Smith.  It was the first of four Whitbred / Volvo campaigns for Carrington, his second seeing him again take on the Round the World race with Smith onboard "Silk Cut"....:

    "Sailing with Lawrie was wonderful, I remember my first glimpse of the Southern Ocean, I've never been with anyone that sailed so hard in the Southern Ocean...I was on the handles on deck....Lawrie was in the hatch and I looked and said 'this is crazy' and Lawrie just said "This is when you make the miles!.""

    Carrington's tales of sailing the 93/94 and 97/98 Whitbread are told with a very obvious enthusiasm that hides nothing of his love for the camaraderie and hardships of round the world sailing.  As the Whitbread transitioned to the Volvo Ocean Race, it's Carrington's memories of building Volvo60 "Assa Abloy" that then begin to reveal a glimpse of the attention to detail he's since become famous for...:

    "(Our sponsor) wanted the coach roof to be red and I caused such a fuss about 'why are we putting this paint on the boat, it's heavier, we don't need that paint' and I worked out per square metre what that was gonna weigh and I said 'No, we're not painting it red', I even phoned the sponsor...there was no compromise!"

    From a lap of the planet on "Assa Abloy", tales from Carrington's sailing career then take in a Jules Verne attempt with Ellen MacArthur onboard catamaran "Kingfisher 2", as this epiosde wraps up.  In Part 2 of this month's pod, Carrington then discusses his final Volvo Ocean Race another onboard "Ericsson",  before the chat turns to life inside the boat shed, and the formation in 2017 of the now world renowned Carrington Boats.

    Robertson's two part podcast with Jason Carrington is a fascinating glimpse into the career of a man that has played a pivotal role in the progression of the sport of sailing, and reveals a passionate character driven by a very obvious and deep rooted love of the sport of competitive yacht racing.

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Series 3 - Ep18 - Paul Goodison Part 2

    Series 3 - Ep18 - Paul Goodison Part 2

    This month Shirley Robertson talks to a man with one of the most varied careers in the sport of professional sailing, as she sits down for an extensive chat with one time Team GB team mate Paul Goodison.

    Having discussed Goodison's Olympic career, which peaked with a gold medal in Beijing 2008, this second part of their chat concentrates on Paul's America's Cup campaigning.

    Most recently Goodison has been an integral part of the New York Yacht Club's 36th America's Cup campaign as main sail trimmer on board American Magic's Patriot.  Goodison and Robertson reflect on many of the key points of the Auckland Cup, as Paul eloquently discusses the process of developing and building a seventy five foot foiling monohull the like of which has never been built before.Ultimately of course, talk turns to the catastrophic capsize midway through the Challenger Series Round Robin that severely effected the campaign...:

    "I remember clearly with about thirty seconds coming into the mark how dark and black the sky was and how the water was getting rougher and looking at the speedo, we were doing 42knots upwind, it was 'woah, this is pretty full on, this is going to be exciting!'"

    Goodison's recollections on American Magic's campaign in Auckland are fascinating, as the team desperately tried to overturn the disadvantages dealt by the nature of the capsize.Looking forward though, perhaps the most exciting of Goodison's insights concerns the next America's Cup.  He reveals to Robertson he has recently re-signed with the American outfit, and will be continuing in a key role as American Magic continue to represent the New York Yacht Club.

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com. 
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 48 min
    Series 3 - Ep17 - Paul Goodison Part 1

    Series 3 - Ep17 - Paul Goodison Part 1

    This month Shirley Robertson talks to a man with one of the most varied careers in the sport of professional sailing, as she sits down for an extensive chat with one time Team GB team mate Paul Goodison.

    Most recently sailing as main trimmer in the 36th America's Cup with American Magic, a closer inspection of Goodison's career reveals a remarkable strength and depth that has brought success across a multitude of disciplines in a career that's spanned several decades. Growing up in the the north of England, Goodison learned to sail on a reservoir, but was quickly mixing it up with that precocious young talent pool of the time, honing his sailing skills with contemporaries Ben Ainslie, Iain Percy, Andrew Simpson and Chris Draper.  A professional career beckoned, which initially led to an early career campaigning in the super competitive Laser class.  After a fourth place in the Athens Games of 2004, Paul topped the podium in Beijing to win Olympic Gold, completing a journey that had began in earnest after a night out celebrating his friend's silver in 1996...:

    "When Ben returned from Atlanta having won a silver medal, we were all at the Laser Nationals...and Ben had his medal with him and I remember for the first time, it was the first Olympic medal I'd ever seen, and held, and all of a sudden you make the connection, this is no longer one of those things you see on the TV, this is a guy you've sailed against and all of a sudden it became clear it's not so far away."

    After the highs of Beijing, Robertson and Goodison then turn to the home Games of London 2012, and Goodison is honest and frank about the disappointment of finishing in seventh place.  Going into the Games Goodison felt well prepared, but he reveals how some poorly timed competition with his peers in the gym seriously effected his chances at his home Games - it's a honest and precautionary tale!

    At the same time, Goodison had fallen back in love with sailing on discovering the foiling moth - he uncovered a new energy and enthusiasm that would propel him to three consecutive world titles in one of the most competitive classes out there.  His love of the moth is clear to see as he shares his enthusiasm with Robertson about the single handed foiling dinghy.

    Looking forward to the second part of their two part chat, Goodison and Robertson spend the second half talking about the America's Cup, and most notably Paul's role with American Magic, the official Challengers of the New York Yacht Club.

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com. 
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
188 Ratings

188 Ratings

Charlie Newsome8 ,

Wonderful insights with the worlds best.

Great podcast with some exceptional sailors, interviewed with great aplomb.

RabJC ,

Simply the best!

Only discovered Shirley's podcast having followed the excellent AC36 coverage where she was, once again, one of the key expert commentators. Her podcast interviews with Giles Scott and later her AC36 Preview podcasts with some of the key people involved from each of the teams was required listening. I have now gone back to the beginning of her podcast series and so far have thoroughly enjoyed listening to 7 hours of fascinating talk with Nathan Outtheridge, Ian Walker, Francois Gabart, Chris Draper, Paul Cayard, Russell Couts and Sam Davies - my journey was not long enough and I sat in the car to finish! Shirley's interview style is great, and her connections in the sailing world are second to none; she gets the best from her interviewees who know that she knows her subject so well, and obviously hold her rightly in high esteem for her own sailing achievements. Go Shirls!! Really looking forward to the rest of the back catalogue. And hope I can find some recordings of her CNN Mainsail programme that also passed me by...

Bagsy79 ,

Great series, with a few caveats

Hi Shirley. I love your series, and it looks like all your reviewers do too. During COVID lockdowns I’ve started listening to lots of podcasts and I hope you won’t mind me making a few constructive suggestions?
1. Trim down the intros. Most of your guests need little introduction to sailing fans and a 3-6 minute intro is far, far too much. The intro background music is painful too. I fast forward to the actual interviews every time.
2. Take cues from your subjects rather than always moving on to your next (scripted) question. For example, in both the RKJ and Grant Simmer episodes there were some moments where both were opening up about things they were clearly willing to talk about, but you moved them on to your next question. To me that can seem quite stilted and detracts from the natural conversational style that makes good podcasts great.
3. Speed up a bit? Perhaps you are trying to cater for an international audience but at times you speak really, really slowly and this rubs off on the interviewees too. I often listen to the episodes at x 1.25 speed!!
4. Avoid guests who aren’t engaging. Just because someone is a good sailor or has done something amazing doesn’t mean they will make a great interview. For example, Grant Simmer and Giles were both quite dull to listen to. Some top sailors have had a bit too much media training and try to downplay everything and are nearly as boring as F1 drivers / footballers. Spithill and Burling aren’t great chat in interviews whereas Bruni is gold dust - please book him in ASAP!!
5. Ask the difficult questions. Always hard for former sport stars to do when many of the subjects are also friends, but at times your interviews are too cosy. Asking sharp questions is a great technique to arouse your interviewee’s passion and bring them to life. Your subjects are human and have made mistakes alongside their achievements - focussing solely on the latter can easily become sycophantic.
6. Mix the tempo. You ask open questions and let your subjects speak at length. Following up with short punchy questions varies the tempo which keeps both listener and subject engaged. You can even take questions from listeners in advance and have a quick fire round at the end - just a thought!
7. Listen to other podcasts. There are lots of other good ones out there to help inspire you.
Keep up the good work and thank you for keeping this going through lockdown and the AC.

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