17 episodes

This monthly podcast showcases the varied and talented work of TECHNE-funded PGR researchers in a series of podcasts on the arts, humanities and academic discussion or anything that relates to how to achieve a PhD.

Techne Podcast Technecast

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

This monthly podcast showcases the varied and talented work of TECHNE-funded PGR researchers in a series of podcasts on the arts, humanities and academic discussion or anything that relates to how to achieve a PhD.

    Invitations: Astrid Korporaal & Sophie Hope

    Invitations: Astrid Korporaal & Sophie Hope

    A conversation with creative practitioner and Birkbeck University Lecturer Dr. Sophie Hope and Astrid Korporaal around the use of performative strategies and role play in research and collaborative art practice, as well as the importance of long-term conversations, time to pause, and thinking in dialogue.

    The first episode in a series of conversations by Techne PhD students Judah Attille, Therese Henningsen, Mark Aerial Waller and Astrid Korporaal. Each episode is based on a research encounter with a creative practitioner connected to the field of sound and moving image. Together, they question the relationships between audience, screen, maker and subject. These exchanges invite you to creatively unsettle conventions around objectivity, ethics and participation at a live online social event on Monday 14th December, hosted by a group of researchers and practitioners involved with moving image.

    ***

    Images and projects discussed in order of appearance:

    1. Derek di Fabio, Conquer the Sky!, Almanac Projects, 2013. [https://almanacprojects.com/public-programme/conquer-the-sky]

    2. Sophie Hope, Cards on the Table, developed with Ania Bas, Sian Hunter-Dodsworth, Sophie Mallet and Henry Mulhall

    3. Theron Schmidt, Untitled, 2019

    4. Frames of Representation festival symposium, 'How to think' with Laura Cull and Rajni Shah [http://www.framesofrepresentation.com/]

    5. Sophie Hope, Performative Interviews (still), 2007.

    6. Sophie Hope, 1984 Dinners (Johannesburg), The Bag Factory, 2014. [https://1984dinners.sophiehope.org.uk/project/johannesburg-dinner/]

    7. Virginia Ariu, Untitled (Care, Community, Ecology), 2020. For #almanaccare, 29 June - 20 December 2020. [https://almanacprojects.com/public-programme/almanaccare]

    8. Sophie Hope and Jenny Richards, Manual Labours, 2013-onwards [http://www.manuallabours.co.uk/]

    9. Sophie Hope and Owen Kelly, Meanwhile in an abandoned warehouse (screenshot), podcast series about cultural democracy, ongoing. [http://miaaw.net/]

    ***

    The Invitations series image is a Eurasian woodcock visiting a balcony in Amsterdam.

    • 26 min
    Ruth Hansford: Enduring Psychoanalysis

    Ruth Hansford: Enduring Psychoanalysis

    Ruth Hansford talks to Professor Bran Nicol, Head of the School of Literature and Languages at Surrey, about cultural “extramural” psychoanalysis and its enduring themes. In the early days of lockdown, over Zoom, they explore hysteria, otherness, language, performance and narrative, intimacy and “extimacy”, and how these can be seen in Hitchcock’s 1954 film Rear Window, a film that also resonates for our contemporary confinement.

    It includes reference to Laplanche and Pontalis's 'The Language of Psychoanalysis' (Routledge, 1988). Photo credit: Nicholas Heath

    • 17 min
    Elizabeth Siddal's Chaotic Medievalism

    Elizabeth Siddal's Chaotic Medievalism

    In this episode, doctoral researcher Nat Reeve unspools the spiralling weirdness in the art and poetry of Elizabeth Siddal (1829-1862). You might know Siddal as the face of Millais's Ophelia, but this episode explores her own creative work.

    We'll wander through some of her works, close reading relentlessly as we go, and trace how they reimagine compositions, retell stories and queer their medieval source material.

    If you've an interest in Pre-Raphaelite paintings, illuminated manuscripts, macabre ballads and a creative process best described as 'dismembering', the ensuing twenty minutes are decidedly for you.

    Music also by Nat Reeve, from Ophelia, a musical about the feral creative process behind the eponymous painting.

    Image © Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

    • 22 min
    Liz K. Miller: Listening to Trees

    Liz K. Miller: Listening to Trees

    The common terminologies used by soundscape ecologists to describe different types of sound are (broadly speaking) animal sounds, human sounds and elemental earth sounds. Liz K. Miller presents her key findings from her thesis to show how these categories fail to capture the soundscape of trees, asking where the sounds made by trees fit into this lexicon and study of sound. Trees are an essential part of the ecosystem but, as yet, have no place in our classification system.

    Liz presents beautiful soundscapes and field recordings from Blackheath Forest in the Surrey hills and Clocaenog Forest in North Wales, leaving us with the rustling of leaves and creaking of bark alongside birdsong and soaring aeroplanes overhead.

    Presenting a new category for these familiar yet often overlooked sounds, Liz asks what can we learn from listening to trees.

    ***

    Liz K Miller (b. 1983, Hexham) is a London-based audio-visual artist and researcher. She graduated from Edinburgh College of Art (BA), Camberwell College of Art (MA), and was a print fellow at the Royal Academy Schools (2013 to 2016). In 2018 she was awarded an AHRC TECHNE scholarship to undertake a practice-based PhD at the Royal College of Art in the School of Arts and Humanities.

    • 15 min
    Tinkering And Listening: Jo Langton

    Tinkering And Listening: Jo Langton

    During what may soon become known as the lockdown period of history, Jo Langton explores a history of electroacoustic music, which is also a history of composers' integration of technology, studio craft and music aesthetics.

    • 12 min
    Whatever Next? An Interview with Careers Consultant Liz Wilkinson

    Whatever Next? An Interview with Careers Consultant Liz Wilkinson

    We spoke to Liz Wilkinson, a technē Careers Consultant, who gave us some valuable advice and insights about what to expect after the PhD finishes, and what we can do to prepare for this turbulent and challenging time. We covered everything from imposter syndrome, to time management and spinning plates; from advice for filling out postdoc and job applications, to how to book a one-on-one tutorial with Liz.

    Technē students can book a one-on-one tutorial with Liz by emailing: Techne.careers@careers.lon.ac.uk or calling 0207 863 6008.

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

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2 Ratings

pollyhember ,

Ace!

Such diverse and interesting topics that allows academics and non-academics alike to engage with the exciting new research coming out of the Techne cohort.

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