29 episodes

Welcome to the Teenage Kicks podcast, where we take the fear out of parenting - or becoming - a teenager. The internet is full of parenting advice, from when you feel those first baby kicks, until they reach secondary school. And then it stops. No one is talking about teen parenting problems; so we’re going to.






Essential listening for teenagers and their parents, as well as those who work with young adults; Teenage Kicks has teen mental health at its core, and each episode will empower young people to tackle their own problems, and give parents the guidance to know how to help them.






Each week Helen speaks to real individuals who've experienced the issues that young people are dealing with now, and they don't sugar-coat it. From exam nerves and career worries to issues around sexuality and consent, we get tips and advice from expert guests who understand what it’s like to be a teenager today.






Helen will also be chatting about tough teenage problems like cyberbullying and self-harm, drugs, alcohol and teenage pregnancy, all with a heavy dose of reality from someone who's been there and made it through to the other side.






Teenage Kicks for Parents:


As parents, we understand some of our kids’ struggles, but let’s face it, it’s been a while, and things have moved on since we last panicked over a detention! Teenage choices today can seem alien to their parents because teenage life has changed so dramatically since we were young. Teenage Kicks helps you unravel topics like social media, sexting and teen self-esteem so that you can figure out what your child needs support with, and what’s just normal teenage behaviour.


 


Teenage Kicks for Teens:


Teenagers and parents come at things from different angles, we know. But teenage life can be challenging, and the support of your parents can make navigating tricky dilemmas easier. Teenage Kicks guests aren’t adults who’ve read a textbook; nor are they heavily invested in your day-to-day safety, like your mum and dad. They are real people who’ve been through what you’re dealing with, and they have the inspiration and advice you need to handle it yourself.


Join Helen each week as she chats to a different guest about topics affecting teenagers in 2020, and helps parents and teens to open up a dialogue that will make life easier to navigate on all sides.


You'll also find me chatting about teen parenting here:


Actually Mummy - my personal blogInstagramTwitter

Useful websites:


The Mix - good information for under 25'sShout - for anyone struggling with anxiety or depression

This series of the Teenage Kicks Podcast is sponsored by Blue Microphones, who gave me the fabulous Yeticaster mic for all my recordings. It's really straightforward to use, and gives me great sound quality without too much editing.


 

Teenage Kicks Podcas‪t‬ Helen Wills

    • Parenting
    • 5.0 • 33 Ratings

Welcome to the Teenage Kicks podcast, where we take the fear out of parenting - or becoming - a teenager. The internet is full of parenting advice, from when you feel those first baby kicks, until they reach secondary school. And then it stops. No one is talking about teen parenting problems; so we’re going to.






Essential listening for teenagers and their parents, as well as those who work with young adults; Teenage Kicks has teen mental health at its core, and each episode will empower young people to tackle their own problems, and give parents the guidance to know how to help them.






Each week Helen speaks to real individuals who've experienced the issues that young people are dealing with now, and they don't sugar-coat it. From exam nerves and career worries to issues around sexuality and consent, we get tips and advice from expert guests who understand what it’s like to be a teenager today.






Helen will also be chatting about tough teenage problems like cyberbullying and self-harm, drugs, alcohol and teenage pregnancy, all with a heavy dose of reality from someone who's been there and made it through to the other side.






Teenage Kicks for Parents:


As parents, we understand some of our kids’ struggles, but let’s face it, it’s been a while, and things have moved on since we last panicked over a detention! Teenage choices today can seem alien to their parents because teenage life has changed so dramatically since we were young. Teenage Kicks helps you unravel topics like social media, sexting and teen self-esteem so that you can figure out what your child needs support with, and what’s just normal teenage behaviour.


 


Teenage Kicks for Teens:


Teenagers and parents come at things from different angles, we know. But teenage life can be challenging, and the support of your parents can make navigating tricky dilemmas easier. Teenage Kicks guests aren’t adults who’ve read a textbook; nor are they heavily invested in your day-to-day safety, like your mum and dad. They are real people who’ve been through what you’re dealing with, and they have the inspiration and advice you need to handle it yourself.


Join Helen each week as she chats to a different guest about topics affecting teenagers in 2020, and helps parents and teens to open up a dialogue that will make life easier to navigate on all sides.


You'll also find me chatting about teen parenting here:


Actually Mummy - my personal blogInstagramTwitter

Useful websites:


The Mix - good information for under 25'sShout - for anyone struggling with anxiety or depression

This series of the Teenage Kicks Podcast is sponsored by Blue Microphones, who gave me the fabulous Yeticaster mic for all my recordings. It's really straightforward to use, and gives me great sound quality without too much editing.


 

    What grooming looks like, and how to cope afterwards, with Emma Cantrell

    What grooming looks like, and how to cope afterwards, with Emma Cantrell

    *Trigger warning - episode contains references to sexual abuse.


    Has your teenager been groomed? Or are you a young person experiencing grooming? In this episode Emma Cantrell talks about her experience of grooming at the age of 12 over a number of years.


    What does grooming mean?


    The NSPCC defines grooming as follows:


    Grooming is when someone builds a relationship, trust and emotional connection with a child or young person so they can manipulate, exploit and abuse them. Children and young people who are groomed can be sexually abused, exploited or trafficked. Anybody can be a groomer, no matter their age, gender or race.

    What is grooming?


    Emma explains how grooming happened to her, and how it progressed to sexual abuse. Listen to the episode to hear how easily it can happen.

    What is online grooming and should parents be worried?


    Online grooming can be of great concern to parents, because it's often easier for a groomer's behaviour to go unnoticed. However it's important to remember that grooming happens in all kinds of situations, not just in an online arena.


    If you're worried about screen time or social media apps, this episode with digital parenting coach Elizabeth is reassuring.


    What are the signs of grooming?


    As a parent it's natural to worry when your child begins a relationship that could lead to sexual activity, but sometimes it's the less obvious connections that need to be examined.


    So how can parents spot the warning signs of grooming? Here are some of the signs of grooming behaviour you might like to keep in mind:


    being secretive about how they're spending their time, both online and offlinehaving an older boyfriend or girlfriendsuddenly having more money than usual, or new things like clothes and mobile phones that they can't or won't explaindrinking or taking drugsspending more or less time online or on their devices.

    What are the long term effects of grooming?


    Emma explains in the episode how the long term effects of grooming affected her through her adult life. Listen to hear how it impacted her at university and beyond, including her development of an eating disorder, as well as issues with self-esteem.


    Where to find help if you have experienced grooming


    The NSPCC has a really good page on groomingThere's also a great page on Childline UK for questions children might have about what

    Who is Emma Cantrell?


    Emma Cantrell is a charity founder and CEO, accidental runner and passionate Do Gooder. She has raised over £3m for small charities and can be found talking passionately about poverty, politics and her steadfast belief in the fundamental good in people to whoever will listen. She lives in Berkshire with her two children, Joni and Wilbur. 


    You can find out more about Emma here:


    First Days Children's CharityTwitter: @emmacantrell_Instagram: @emma_cantrell

    More teenage parenting tips:


    There are lots more episodes of the Teenage Kicks podcast. You can email me on teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. I’ve also got some posts on the blog that might help parents with other teenage parenting dilemmas, so do pop over to Actually Mummy if you fancy a read.


    Thank you so much for listening! Subscribe now to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear all my new episodes. I'll be talking to some fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives.


    You can also find more from me on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills.


    For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co.


    Please note that I am not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    How to deal with loneliness when you have a disability

    How to deal with loneliness when you have a disability

    Nathan Todd was born with cerebral palsy. He describes so charmingly how this affected him growing up.


    As he got older, he began to experience loneliness as a result of the labels others placed on him, including the adults around him.


    Nathan is now a connection coach, helping his clients to find meaningful connections with other people and combat loneliness in their lives.


    Nathan also campaigns against the labelling that happens to people with disabilities under the hashtag #nolabeldefinesme.


    Where to find Nathan


    Instagram @therealnathantoddClubhouse @realnathantoddYouTube No Label Live

    Listen to the podcast for tips if you're feeling judged, on the outside, or alone - whether you have a disability or not!


    More teenage parenting tips:


    There are lots more episodes of the Teenage Kicks podcast. You can email me on teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. I’ve also got some posts on the blog that might help parents with other teenage parenting dilemmas, so do pop over to Actually Mummy if you fancy a read.


    Thank you so much for listening! Subscribe now to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear all my new episodes. I'll be talking to some fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives.


    You can also find more from me on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills.


    For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co.


    Please note that I am not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Practical tips for GCSE Revision - ideas to help parents help their teens

    Practical tips for GCSE Revision - ideas to help parents help their teens

    How do you get the best GCSE results you can during Covid-19?


    If your child was expecting to be sitting GCSEs in 2021 the chances are they and you have been been feeling quite stressed since the announcement that GCSEs will not go ahead "as normal" in 2021.


    Teachers Emily and Paul Hughes answer the question of how to pass your GCSEs in straightforward terms:


    6 Tips to do well in GCSEs


    Impress your teachers.Be proactive. This means doing more than you need to.Use past papers. Testing yourself is one of the most effective ways of cementing your knowledge.Approach every test as if it's a final exam.Make a revision plan and stick to it.Make your revision effective. Work smarter, not harder.

    Where to find Emily and Paul


    You can find more from Emily and Paul on their website Parent Guide to GCSE, where you can download their free revision planner, or subscribe for their full service and receive weekly tips on supporting your child through their GCSEs. Or you can access the same information in Emily's book GCSE Survival Guide for Parents. 


     You can also join the Parent Guide to GCSEs community on Facebook.


    Emily and Paul also mentioned James Shone, who is a schools speaker.


    More teenage parenting tips:


    There are lots more episodes of the Teenage Kicks podcast. You can email me on teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. I’ve also got some posts on the blog that might help parents with other teenage parenting dilemmas, so do pop over to Actually Mummy if you fancy a read.


    Thank you so much for listening! Subscribe now to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear all my new episodes. I'll be talking to some fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives.


    You can also find more from me on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills.


    For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co.


    Please note that I am not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional.

    • 38 min
    On Becoming a Parent to Your Own Sister - with Taylor James

    On Becoming a Parent to Your Own Sister - with Taylor James

    What happens when the unthinkable happens, and you suddenly have to become the 'parent' to your own sibling?


    This is what happened to Taylor James, who was just 25 when his mum suffered terrible brain injury following a routine operation. On the day his sister started her GCSEs Taylor was faced with needing to tell her their mum might not live, and subsequently making the decision to turn off her life-support machine.


    Miraculously, she survived, and Taylor tells the emotional story of how he went from child to parent overnight, not just to his sister, but to his mum, who know needs full-time neurological care.


    This is a young guy who had to navigate not only the world of care homes, but also the drama of his sister's prom - he says he's now dreading her wedding day!


    But through all this, Taylor's strength and wisdom shines through, and he describes how facing the unimaginable has made him realise that there's nothing to be scared of in life; that whatever is going to happen will happen, in spite of our efforts to control it, but that we have what it takes to navigate it, whatever it is.


    Have a listen to his words of advice to anyone facing a difficult period in their lives, and then go and connect with him; because - as he says - having a good waffle is the biggest coping mechanism there is. And it's free!


    Where to find Taylor


    The Waffle Shop PodcastInstagram

    More teenage parenting tips:


    There are lots more episodes of the Teenage Kicks podcast. You can email me on teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. I’ve also got some posts on the blog that might help parents with other teenage parenting dilemmas, so do pop over to Actually Mummy if you fancy a read.


    Thank you so much for listening! Subscribe now to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear all my new episodes. I'll be talking to some fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives.


    You can also find more from me on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills.


    For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co.


    Please note that I am not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional.

    • 1 hr
    5 Things I Wish Adults Knew About Teenagers - with Kk from Insider Scoop

    5 Things I Wish Adults Knew About Teenagers - with Kk from Insider Scoop

    This week on the Teenage Kicks podcast I have a rather exciting guest - and actual, real, live teenager!


    Kk is a teen podcaster, and she reached out to me because she wanted parents to "understand what teens really think and feel" about things like bullying, friendships, and school. She talked to me about growing up with social media, and the impact it has on teenagers' mental health.






    What teenagers wish parents knew about their kids


    Not everything needs to be academicWe are going to experimentWe need your supportBeing a teen is hardLessons teens need to learn from their parents.

    Listen to the episode to find out what Kk has to say about these points.






    Ask a teenager


    I also asked Kk the questions parents been burning to know the answers to:


    What's really going on in our teens' minds when they look unhappy to us, and why they sometimes shrug off our concernsHow common is it to view porn, and does it put pressure on girls to have sex before they're ready?What impact does peer pressure really have on teens' drug and alcohol use?Are parents worrying too much about screen time?

    Kk has some brilliant things to say to teenagers themselves about how to navigate a life that can sometimes feel a bit overwhelming. Have a listen to her episode on insecurities here.






    More from Kk


    Kk is a teen podcaster and host of the Insider Scoop podcast. She is also an aspiring talk show host, who shares her passion of entertaining and motivating others  through her compelling stories and discussions on different topics. During Kk's free time she enjoys spending time with family and friends, along with staying active. You can find more from Kk on Instagram.






    More teenage parenting tips:


    There are lots more episodes of the Teenage Kicks podcast. You can email me on teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. I’ve also got some posts on the blog that might help parents with other teenage parenting dilemmas, so do pop over to Actually Mummy if you fancy a read.


    Thank you so much for listening! Subscribe now to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear all my new episodes. I'll be talking to some fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives.


    You can also find more from me on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills.


    For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co.


    Please note that I am not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Dealing With Infidelity in Your Parents' Marriage - a Teenage Perspective From Olivia

    Dealing With Infidelity in Your Parents' Marriage - a Teenage Perspective From Olivia

    I had a fascinating chat with Olivia (not her real name) about how she felt as a child and teenager witnessing the difficulties in her parents' marriage after her father was unfaithful to her mother over the course of several years.


    Olivia's parents are still together, but throughout her teenage years she was affected by the impact her father's affairs had on her own life, and on her mother's emotional health. From financial losses and the need to change schools, to difficulties in seeing her extended family, the practical problems of a messy marriage weren't the only challenges Olivia faced.


    She says that any parents navigating the potential breakdown of their marriage need to bear in mind that having to monitor and worry about the state of your parents' relationship is really tough on a child, especially when they're just discovering who they are themselves, with all the stresses that brings.


    Her biggest piece of advice? Understand that your kids are teenagers. They have their own problems, and will find the addition of yours overwhelming at times. As such, Olivia says that whilst it's important to be honest with teens, you also need to make sure you don't burden them with more information than they can handle at that moment. There will come a time for whole truths, but perhaps that time isn't always in the moment.


    Further Support


    Charity Relate has a good page on how to talk to children about divorce and separationVoices in the Middle is an organisation created for young people by young people, and can offer tips to parents about how to start the conversation on relationship difficulties.

    More teenage parenting tips:


    There are lots more episodes of the Teenage Kicks podcast. You can email me on teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. I’ve also got some posts on the blog that might help parents with other teenage parenting dilemmas, so do pop over to Actually Mummy if you fancy a read.


    Thank you so much for listening! Subscribe now to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear all my new episodes. I'll be talking to some fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives.


    You can also find more from me on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills. I'm delighted to say that I've recently been added to this list of top teen parenting podcasters, which - after only two series I'm super proud of.


    For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co.


    Please note that I am not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional.

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
33 Ratings

33 Ratings

Andrea, Clinical Psychologist ,

Honest, courageous, compassionate and relaxed conversations

Fantastic resource for parents, teenagers and professionals (teachers, social workers and therapists would benefit from this). Really important topics and conversations covered In such an informed and empathic manner.

Wadirum21 ,

What a fantastic resource for parents and teens alike

I absolutely love these frank conversations. So much wisdom and great advice. All packaged with wit and fun. I wish I’d had this resource when our kids were teens. It might have been a lot easier all round! If you have teens this is a must listen!

Kathy Newport ,

Jenny

Such a moving yet uplifting episode. Having never been subjected to anything like this i cannot even begin to imagine how it must feel but Jenny is an inspiration. This will help any parent whose child suffers in the future and the police would do well to listen too!!!

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