141 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper Podcasts

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.7, 77 Ratings

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    New series in September. Meanwhile…

    New series in September. Meanwhile…

    A new series of The Week in Art podcast will begin on 4 September; expect all the latest art world news, exclusive interviews, exhibition tours and much more. In the meantime, why not subscribe to A brush with..., the brand new podcast from The Art Newspaper, which we launched this week. You can hear the trailer in this podcast. The first episode, A brush with... Michael Armitage, is out now, and three more in-depth conversations with painters are released in the coming weeks. There are also details of the next event in The Art Newspaper Live series on our YouTube channel: on 13 August, our host Ben Luke will talk to Russell Tovey and Robert Diament from the art podcast Talk Art.
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    • 3 min
    Ready to see some art? The top exhibitions of the summer

    Ready to see some art? The top exhibitions of the summer

    This week, in our last episode of this series, we look at the top exhibitions you can see this summer in the UK, Europe and the US, with Anna Brady and Gareth Harris joining Ben Luke in London, and Helen Stoilas, Nancy Kenney and Jillian Steinhauer in New York. We also reflect on the anxieties and ethics of visiting galleries as Covid-19 remains widespread.
    And we have our usual Work of the Week, this time chosen by the artist Hassan Hajjaj, who looks at an album cover, Doctor Alimantado’s 1978 debut The Best Dressed Chicken in Town, and discusses how it influenced his own photography.

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    • 1 hr 26 min
    What will culture be like in the next decade?

    What will culture be like in the next decade?

    We explore the Serpentine Galleries’ new report into Future Art Ecosystems: with existing art industry models under threat, can new ones emerge in the post-coronavirus era? We talk to Ben Vickers, the Serpentine Galleries’ chief technology officer, about art and advanced technologies. As his BBC radio series Great Gallery Tours continues, we hear from a Simon Schama, who is marooned in Trump’s America yet yearns for a sunlit morning on the Thames in London: his choice for our Work of the Week is J.M.W. Turner’s Mortlake Terrace: Early Summer Morning in the Frick in New York. And as unemployment in the US surges past Great Depression-era levels, we look at a historic cultural programme that may have pointers for this moment: the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act or CETA, a response to the economic crisis of the 1970s.
    Links:
    The Art Newspaper: theartnewspaper.com
    The Serpentine Galleries' Future Art Ecosystems report: https://www.serpentinegalleries.org/whats-on/future-art-ecosystems/
    Simon Schama's BBC radio series Great Gallery Tours: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000kw4t
    Turner's Mortlake Terrace: Early Summer Morning: https://collections.frick.org/objects/267/mortlake-terrace-early-summer-morning
    CETA: ceta-arts.com

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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Staff cuts: are museums protecting their workers?

    Staff cuts: are museums protecting their workers?

    This week, as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and the lockdown hit museums, we’re seeing unprecedented layoffs on both sides of the Atlantic. We ask: are museums doing all they can to save their staff? We look at the latest developments in the UK and US, where hundreds of museum workers are losing their jobs.
    Our museums editor, Hannah McGivern sets the scene in the US and Europe, our senior editor Margaret Carrigan speaks to Dana Kopel, the New Museum Union’s unit chair, and Frankie Altamura, one of the union’s stewards, both of whom lost their jobs at the museum this week, about the growing movement for museum workers’ rights across the US and whether institutions can care for their workers. And we speak to Steven Warwick of the Public and Commercial Services union about the effect of the job cuts in UK museums on his members.
    This week’s Work of the Week is chosen by Emily Butler, a curator at the Whitechapel Gallery in London, about Rhea Storr’s film Junkanoo Talk (2017). You can see the full film here.

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    • 1 hr 14 min
    Hong Kong: has the new law "destroyed" the art scene?

    Hong Kong: has the new law "destroyed" the art scene?

    What is the future of the art world in Hong Kong now that a new national security law curbs human rights and threatens freedom of expression? We look at the effects on artists and the wider art scene with two people based there: the artist Kacey Wong and the commentator Alexandra Seno.
    And in our Work of the Week Alyce Mahon, the author of the new book The Marquis de Sade and the Avant-Garde, explores one of Leonor Fini’s illustrations for Story of O by Pauline Réage.

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    • 1 hr 2 min
    The destruction of Australia’s Aboriginal heritage

    The destruction of Australia’s Aboriginal heritage

    This week, we look at the destruction on 24 May of sacred Aboriginal sites in Western Australia by a mining company. We talk to Sven Ouzman, an archeologist and activist at the University of Western Australia about the most recent events and the wider context. Can anything be done to better protect Aboriginal country and Australia’s ancient heritage? 
    Also, this week, as a Russian referendum approves Vladimir Putin’s new constitution—a foregone conclusion, of course—we look at the Russia's alarming crackdown on artists.
    And in the latest in our series Lonely Works, in which explore art behind the doors of museums closed due to Covid-19, we look at a work that will soon be lonely no more. The artist George Shaw tells us about Thomas Jones’s A Wall in Naples, which will be seen for the first time in more than three months at the National Gallery in London when it re-opens on 8 July. 
    Links:
    Our full guide to gallery openings in UK, Europe and the US
    Thomas Jones's A Wall in Naples at the National Gallery
    The University of Western Australia's Centre for Rock Art Research and Management

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    • 1 hr 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
77 Ratings

77 Ratings

Recidivist2018 ,

Excellent

Terrific podcast, excellent themes well explored by an astute presenter.

Soapsoane ,

I love this podcast: Ben’s Enthusiasm for art and artists is rich and informative

This is a great podcast: reminds me of the depth that Julia Hobsbawm’s podcast Editorial Intelligence reached: this paper and podcast is changing the way we think about news and art: in fact; News As Art!
Thanks!
Paula

DanSN117 ,

Well produced pod

Pod is great, well produced and the host has a knack of asking the right questions.

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