100 episodes

Film academics Dr Dario Llinares and Dr Neil Fox introduce a live screening followed by an audience Q&A. The podcast also features interviews with filmmakers, scholars, writers and actors who debate all aspects of cinema and film culture.

The Cinematologists Podcast The Cinematologists

    • TV & Film
    • 4.7 • 48 Ratings

Film academics Dr Dario Llinares and Dr Neil Fox introduce a live screening followed by an audience Q&A. The podcast also features interviews with filmmakers, scholars, writers and actors who debate all aspects of cinema and film culture.

    Akira Kurosawa at the BFI (w/ Asif Kapadia and Ian Hayden Smith)

    Akira Kurosawa at the BFI (w/ Asif Kapadia and Ian Hayden Smith)

    For this episode, Neil and Dario dive back into the work of master Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa having last talked about his cinema in the earliest days of the podcast when they screened Yojimbo for an audience in Falmouth.
    The occasion for this revisit is a new, extensive retrospective of his work hosted at the BFI Southbank (and some regional partner cinemas) and on their BFI Player platform. The season is curated by filmmaker Asif Kapadia and writer Ian Hayden Smith, who Dario talked to as the two-month long season got underway.
    Their discussion covers the curation approach, the influence of Kurosawa on them and the wider film community more broadly, and why he remains a key figure of focus in global film history.
    Elsewhere, Neil and Dario look at some of Kurosawa's post-War films set in contemporary Japan, with a deeper focus on I Live In Fear (1955) and High and Low (1963). 
    With thanks to Sarah Bemand at the BFI for the invitation to cover this season, setting up the interview with Asif and Ian and providing access to the BFI Player to view titles.
    For more on the ongoing season visit the BFI website here. 
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    You can listen to The Cinematologists for free, wherever you listen to podcasts: click here to follow.
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/extended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only £2.
    We really appreciate any reviews you might write (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
    _____
    Music Credits:
    ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’
    Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing

    • 1 hr 39 min
    Enys Men (w/ Dir. Mark Jenkin)

    Enys Men (w/ Dir. Mark Jenkin)

    For our first episode of 2023, Dario speaks to a great friend of the podcast Mark Jenkin about his new Cornish "folk horror", Enys Men. Starring Mary Woodvine as a volunteer isolated on a Cornish island seemingly with the task of observing and recording the local wildlife. This sets the stage for a disquieting, time-bending, psycho-ecological fable, forged through Jenkin's singular audio-visual sensibility. 
    In a wide-ranging conversation, Mark goes deep into the artistic process underpinning the film, thinks through questions the work throws up about loneliness, isolation, time and memory. The notion of genre is another topic of discussion, with the renaissance in cinematic folk horror. But Dario forward his thesis that Enys Men is a "last woman on Earth" sci-fi.      
    It's also great have Neil returning to the show after his hiatus. He reviews another potential entry to the international folk horror canon Yanuari (January). From Bulgarian director Andrey Paounov and co-written by former Cinematologists guest Alex Barrett.
    Shownotes
    ENYS MEN is in cinemas now. 
    The Cinematic DNA of ENYS MEN season [curated by director Mark Jenkin] runs at BFI Southbank until 31 January with selected films and Jenkin’s shorts collection available on BFI Player now.
    ENYS MEN will be released on Blu-ray/DVD and BFI Player on 1 May. The ENYS MEN Original Score by Mark Jenkin is out now digitally via Invada Records and released on vinyl on 24 February.
    Documentary mention by Mark and Neil on Folk Horror is Woodlands Dark, Days Bewitched
    You can listen to The Cinematologists for free, wherever you listen to podcasts: click here to follow.
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/extended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only £2.
    We really appreciate any reviews you might write (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
    _____
    Music Credits:
    ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’
    Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing

    • 1 hr 31 min
    2022 Review (w/critic Clarisse Loughrey)

    2022 Review (w/critic Clarisse Loughrey)

    We come to the end of another cinematic year, and for our look back over 2022 Dario is joined by The Independent's film critic  Clarisse Loughrey. As usual, the episode is contextualised with a meander through some of the big themes and news stories of the year in film. This is followed  by a countdown of both Dario and Clarisse's top five films of the year. 
    Both Dario and Neil want to thank our audience for their continued support throughout the year, we hope you have enjoyed the season and continue to be a listener into 2023. Dario will be publishing the January newsletter at the end of the week which will double up as something of a New Year reflection. 
    All the best to you all for 2023 - Dario and Neil.
    Shownotes
    Clarisse Loughrey on Twitter. 
    Clarisse's full films of the year list, published in The Independent.
    You can listen to The Cinematologists for free, wherever you listen to podcasts: click here to follow.
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/extended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only £2.
    We really appreciate any reviews you might write (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
    _____
    Music Credits:
    ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’
    Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing
     

    • 1 hr 32 min
    Blood Simple (w/ Producer James Dean)

    Blood Simple (w/ Producer James Dean)

    So this is the penultimate episode of 2022. We were at the Garden Cinema on Tuesday 20th to watch The Coen Brothers Blood Simple. My co-host for the evening was the Producer and now regular contributor to the James Dean. James was absolutely superb, both an astute appreciator of the Coen Brothers as artists, but fascinatingly relaying some nuggets of personal experience from having actually met and watched the Coen's at work. Listening to James and watching the film, which was an absolutely incredible DCP restoration by Criterion with 5.1 sound, I just was reminded about the pure joy of watching a film.
    It’s almost heresy to say, but the film seems to offer itself up for the pure joy of watching, without and underlying sense of message. It’s cine-literate, but unpretentiously so, and it’s refreshingly Apolitical. Of course, the argument arises that there is no such thing a culture product that is Apolitical. Everything is defined by an underlying ideology. As a well-trained cultural studies scholar, the notion of being always already within ideology is something that has been drilled into me. Indeed, one could suggest that the Coens, whether they would explicitly acknowledge or speak to the wider allusions of their work, have been knowing chroniclers of the Absurdist contradictions at the heart of the American dream.
    Yet, this is never imposed didactically. On the contrary there is arguably a respect for audiences literacy of, and practice in, to borrow from Stuart Hall, decoding and negotiating the signifiers of film. That might sound overwrought, in the way I’ve put it. What I mean is, they revel in the possibilities of cinema as form. Unlike many other filmmakers for who use references as pastiche or as an exercise in nerding out. The Coens invite you to the self-contained pleasure of the film they are presenting you with, without the necessity of connecting a reference external to the text. Even with the noir invocations, exploitation riffs, tours of pulp violence, one never feels excluding from enjoying the fundamental filmic pleasures.
    Watching and listening, to this pristinely recreated digital artifact, in such a perfect auditorium, and with the knowledge of a shared audience intent, my will to analyse interpret gradually just succumbed to a purity of pleasure. Looking back, if there has been a theme to this season of the podcast, it has been a kind of tension. Between how we define and categorise films; the push to define the status of cinema in a fractured and uncertain media landscape. And the ephemeral, fleeting joy of those minute of empathy and immersion. Where the mechanistic shaping of light and sound creates a canvas of illusion which offers the chance to connect the external universe with your internal dreamscape.
    With just the end of year review to come, I want to thank all the contributors to this season. Guest hosts James Dean, Caroline Catz, Mary Wild, Sarah Cleaver, David Lowbridge-Ellis, Catherine Wheatley, Savina Petcova, Chris Cassingham, Clarisse Lockree, the podcast really has functioned thanks to your generosity of time and insight. Also, thanks to all the other guests we have had on the show this season.
    Thanks to George and all the staff at the Garden for Hosting the live episodes. You should all join their membership scheme immediately. It’s a magical and still largely undiscovered venue in the heart of London.
    And thanks to Neil of course, who has been on a break apart from the Sight and Sound episode.  His support and encouragement behind the scenes has been invaluable. It’s been a challenge to do this without him and I’m looking forward to getting back to the main purpose of the show, which is our movie conversation (DL).
    ---
    You can listen to The Cinematologists for free, wherever you listen to podcasts: click here to follow.
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/extended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinemato

    • 55 min
    Film Curation (Beyond Interpretation w/Chris Cassingham)

    Film Curation (Beyond Interpretation w/Chris Cassingham)

    In this episode, Dario talks MA student in Film Curation Chris Cassingham about his graduation film series: Beyond Interpretation. Screening at the ICA in London in January, the series that explores the connections between paranoia, conspiracy, anxiety, and the precarious realities of artistic creation at the margins of the American film industry. At a time when it is increasingly difficult to make and distribute films that defy simple categorisation, resist commercial expectations of narrative and form, and whose concerns are often out of step with capitalist ideals of profit, it is important to seize every available opportunity to present them to new audiences.
    Dario discusses with Chris his course at NFTS and the film curation itself as discipline, reflecting on the challenging times for exhibitors and the film industry as a whole in getting audiences to come to theatres. Dario contextualises this in his opening remarks, thinking about cinema-going as a recurring theme of the podcast, even before the pandemic. The impact of streaming has obviously had a major influence on film audiences, along with shifting criteria in what types of films mainstream audiences deem worthy to see at the cinema.
    ---
    You can listen to The Cinematologists for free, wherever you listen to podcasts: click here to follow.
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/extended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only £2.
    We really appreciate any reviews you might write (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
    _____
    Music Credits:
    ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’
    Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing

    • 48 min
    Sight and Sound’s Greatest Films of All Time 2022 (Part 2)

    Sight and Sound’s Greatest Films of All Time 2022 (Part 2)

    In part 2 of our Sight and Sound special, Dario talks to the managing editor of Sight and Sound Magazine Isabel Stevens about the collation and publication of this list. With over 1600 hundred critics contributing their top tens (up from 800 in 2012), the move towards greater diversity is clear. Dario drills down into that with Isabel, along with unpacking some of the other key trends that have emerged. Isabel also takes us through her selections. 
    Also on the show, we welcome back Savina Petkova for her take on being invited to contribute, the issues with lists in general, and compiling a set of 10 films that complement each other. She also addresses the inherent performativity of creating a "best-of" for public scrutiny; how one cannot help but consider the cultural reaction, even in the abstract. And of course we and take wonderful meander through her choices. It’s a great list that is based on a single theme: Love. 
    You can listen to The Cinematologists for free, wherever you listen to podcasts: click here to follow.
    We hope you have enjoyed this double episode, it is complemented by a bonus podcast that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only £2. #SupportIndieMedia
    We really appreciate any reviews you might write (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
    _____
    Music Credits:
    ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’
    Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing
     

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

adammpark ,

Number 1 film podcast!

The Cinematologists sits perfectly in the space between academic and accessible. Although it's produced by film scholars it never feels like a lecture, but benefits so much from the knowledge and understanding the two hosts can bring to their discussions. The show inspires me, deepens my love and understanding of film, and has introduced me to plenty new favourites that had completely evaded me.

KeepArtEvil ,

An accessible pathway into contemporary film thought

The podcast description references the hosts’ academic backgrounds, but I’ve found myself, as someone poorly engaged with film theory, taking so much from this podcast. That only happens because the hosts want to share their passion and insights about film in an accessible and approachable way. Something that comes across in every episode.

I’ve started playing an intellectual game with myself where I’ll listen to the podcast, watch the films being reviewed and develop a counter argument to the views of people on the show. Not because I’m awkward (maybe a little) but because the podcast encourages a multiplicity of approaches and passions about film. And it perfectly captures the joy of different perspectives existing alongside each other.

If you love film, you need this podcast on your subscriptions.

BizzoH ,

Fascinating

Just discovered this courtesy of my son who's studying film at Falmouth. They certainly bring the subject to life, excellent!

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