100 episodes

The Cinematologists Podcast: Exploring, Analysing and Celebrating Film Culture

The Cinematologists Podcast The Cinematologists

    • Film Interviews
    • 4.8, 39 Ratings

The Cinematologists Podcast: Exploring, Analysing and Celebrating Film Culture

    Ep105 Tokyo Story

    Ep105 Tokyo Story

    The first of our collaborations with the BFI Japan season focuses on what is generally regarded as a masterpiece of cinema: Yasujirö Ozu's Tokyo Story (1953). In many ways, a simple story of grandparents visiting their children in the city, but one that gradually builds on the resentments and disappointments of intergenerational alienation. Dario and Neil discuss the film in terms of its status in 'the canon', its reverence as Ozu's finest work in a prolific career, and as arguably the purest distillation of the auteur's thematic and formal concerns. A masterclass in directorial precision and visual composition that both registers as a distinct piece of cinematic art but equally, immerses the viewer into its film world where situations and character relations play out in subtle but profound ways. 
    Dario and Neil also discuss some of the other films they have watched in the BFI Japan season so far, including Mikio Naruse's Floating Clouds (1955) and When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (1960). Again, these are films that are painted on the canvas of post-war Japan but focus on the uncertain status and role of women with both featuring the superb Hideko Takamine in the leading role. Very different are Takeshi Kitano's violent, Nihilistic thrillers Violent Cop (1989), Boiling Point (1990) and Sonatine (1993). Visceral gripping, and bleak they are riveting examples of Japanese cinema made with an American B-movie sensibility. And for some trashy fun look no further than 'king of the monster movies' Ishiro Honda: Mothra (1961), Dogora (1964) & Godzilla v King Kong (1962) can all be found on Amazon Prime.
    Neil also reviews a new series of Bela Lugosi films based on the work of Edgar Allen Poe and released by Masters of Cinema: Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) The Black Cat (1934), The Raven (1935).
    This is our final episode of Season 11, we thank you for the continued support and hope you rejoin us back in the autumn.
    You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on:
    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh
    Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/users/thecinematologists
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50.
    We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
     

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Episode 104 Film Editing with Katie Bryer

    Episode 104 Film Editing with Katie Bryer

    Katie Bryer is a freelance film editor whose brilliant work on Bruce Lee and the Outlaw, Maiden, and Virunga demonstrates the diverse possibilities of documentary storytelling. In this episode, Katie discusses the development of her craft, working through student shorts, children's television, and for the BBC on Holby City. The gaining of confidence and building of skills and experience in a role, clearly underpins the idea that doing the work, having a complete commitment to one's passion, is the key to 'getting good'. Katie discusses with Dario some of the key elements of editing as fundamental to the filmmaking process: cutting between different types of footage, focusing on character, how to define time and space, and whether one truly finds the film in the edit. Dario and Neil discuss editing in a broader sense, including highlights of some of their favourite films from an editing perspective. 
    The episode also features chat about recently viewed films both new and old including The Last Black Man in San Francisco (Joe Talbot), The Vast of Night (Andrew Patterson), Interview with the Vampire (Neil Jordan), The Lost Boys (Joel Schumacher), A Foreign Affair (Billy Wilder), Mr Vampire (Ricky Lau), Criss Cross (Robert Siodmak), Little Joe (Jessica Hauser), Fanny Lye Deliver'd (Thomas Clay).
    Show Notes
    Katie Bryer's Website
    Bruce Lee and the Outlaw
    Maiden
    Mark Kermode's Review of The Vast of Night
    You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on:
    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh
    Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/users/thecinematologists
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50.
    We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
     

    • 1 hr 29 min
    Ep103 Sometimes Always Never

    Ep103 Sometimes Always Never

    Sometimes Always Never is the debut feature film from Liverpool filmmaker, musician and designer Carl Hunter. It marks the latest stage in a collaboration with screenwriter Frank Cottrell-Boyce and stars Bill Nighy, Sam Riley, Alice Lowe, Jenny Agutter and Tim McInerny.
    The film was released digitally in March, following a successful festival run over the past couple of years, and tells the story of Nighy searching for his long missing son, with Riley as the brother left behind. It’s a moving story, beautifully told and as lockdown got underway, Neil talked with Carl about the film, his filmmaking process and that slippery question ‘what is British cinema?’.
    Prior to their chat, Carl sent Neil some images - his scrapbook of ideas and some polaroids - that informed the filmmaking process. He has kindly agreed for us to post a couple here, including the one that sold Bill Nighy on the project as discussed on this episode.
    The conversation is framed by Neil and Dario’s discussion of the film and how it engages with ideas of Britishness and masculinity, the subtleties that mark the film out from other similarly themed films and the thrill of finding work to champion that sits on the fringes of the mainstream glut.
    Sometimes Always Never can be rented on iTunes, Amazon, YouTube and pretty much anywhere you get your streaming rental fix.
    Two of Carl and Frank Cottrell-Boyce’s previous collaborations, the brilliant Shakespeare inspired short A Winter’s Tale and the Beatles inspired short A Day In Life: Twenty Four Zero Hours can be found on YouTube here and here. They are superb shorts in their own right, but also provide a wonderful road map to their debut feature together.
    You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on:
    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh
    Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/users/thecinematologists
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50.
    We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.

    • 1 hr 47 min
    Ep102 The Uncertain Kingdom

    Ep102 The Uncertain Kingdom

    The Uncertain Kingdom is “an anthology of twenty short films for our uncertain times”. The brainchild of producers Isabel Feeer, Georgia Goggin and John Jencks, the anthology is released digitally on June 1st with the hope that the films will “inspire, support and encourage new conversations about our interesting times’. 10 filmmakers were invited to make work for the project, with the other 10 shorts selected from an open submission call that saw over 1000 entries and work curated under narrative, documentary and experimental banners. The aim of the project was to create a snapshot of Britain in 2020, coming from an awareness on the behalf of the producing team that these post-Brexit vote times, were interesting across the political and social spectrum (and all this before a little something called Coronavirus).
    For this episode, Neil talked to one of the project’s producers John Jencks as well as narrative filmmaker John Wingard (Pavement), documentary filmmakers Alison Hargreaves (Camelot) and Stroma Cairns (Sauna), and director Antonia Campbell-Hughes (Acre Fall Between). Apologies to Iggy LDN (Sucka Punch) and Sophie King (Swan) whose interviews were recorded but whose files were found to be corrupted at editing stage.
    In the episode, Dario and Neil discuss the project, the films and the short film form more broadly. They also pay tribute to filmmaker Lynn Shelton and say happy birthday to the marvellous organisation Raising Films, who celebrated five years of activism on behalf of parents and carers in the film industry recently.
    The website, with more information on all the films and filmmakers and where to watch them, can be found here.
    This is a link to Neil’s Longform interview with Lynn Shelton for the journal Mai: Feminism and Visual Culture, from May 2019, shared here so listeners can enjoy spending time in the company of a great filmmaker sharing so much intimate wisdom about her career and craft. Her death is a real loss to our beloved art form.
    You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on:
    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh
    Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/users/thecinematologists
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50.
    We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.

    • 1 hr 54 min
    Ep101 Women Make Film (Mark Cousins)

    Ep101 Women Make Film (Mark Cousins)

    For the first episode of a new century (of Cinematologists episodes) we are proud to present a conversation with esteemed filmmaker and cineaste Mark Cousins to celebrate the release of his mammoth, 14hr, poetic documentary project, and cinephile treasure trove, Women Make Film.
    Recorded during lockdown in 2020, the conversation features Neil and Dario talking to Mark about his process and approach as well as the discoveries and rediscoveries contained within this love letter to cinema and foregrounding of forgotten, undervalued and sidelined directorial voices.
    The film is released on Blu-ray by the BFI on Monday 18th May, with the BFI Player also streaming the film in 5 parts over the coming 5 weeks from the same date.
    Thanks to Jill Reading at the BFI for helping set up the conversation with Mark. Also, for sending us the review copy of Ozu’s Flavour Of Green Tea and Rice, which gets discussed on this episode alongside two releases from Eureka/Masters of Cinema - The Specialists (Sergio Corbucci) and Throw Down (Johnnie To). Thanks to Steve Hills at Eureka for furnishing review copies of the latter titles.
    You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on:
    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh
    Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/users/thecinematologists
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50.
    We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.

    • 1 hr 36 min
    Ep100 5 Years & 100 Episodes

    Ep100 5 Years & 100 Episodes

    In this special episode, marking 100 episodes and five years of The Cinematologists podcast, Neil and Dario take a breath. With the help of friends and supporters of the podcast they discuss the history and evolution of the show, their formative experiences of cinemas, meaningful film viewing experiences, critics and academics that helped shaped their understanding of talking about cinema on the page and elsewhere, and what they think and hope the future of cinema(s) and the podcast might look like.
    This episode, like the previous 99 and the show in general, would not be possible without the engagement of the listeners and the willingness of participants to give up their time and knowledge to help make the podcast what it is.
    Thank you to everyone who has listened, come to a taping, recorded an interview, provided feedback, bought a t-shirt or just said ‘nice one’.
    For episode 100 Neil and Dario especially want to thank Ellen Cheshire, Ryan Gilbey, Gwenno, Mark Jenkin, James Maitre, Marbelle, Kingsley Marshall, Andrew Peirce, Lottie Smith, Tessa and Ren Zelen for their contributions.
    A wonderful time was had thinking about the comments and questions that were supplied and talking them through on the recording. Here’s hoping you the listener feel the same.
    Thanks for listening.
    The music for episode 100 is ‘Open Again Eventually’ by Leah Kardos, which can be heard in full here. In title and tone it felt like the right music for now, for this episode. Thanks Leah for letting us use it. To buy Leah’s latest EP ‘Bird Rib’, where this song is taken from, go to her Bandcamp page. Leah is a doctor of philosophy and senior lecturer in music at Kingston University where she co-founded the Visconti Studio with legendary music producer Tony Visconti.
    You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on:
    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh
    Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/users/thecinematologists
    We also produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50.
    We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing on Social Media is the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show.
     
     
     
     

    • 2 hrs 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Ultron-8 ,

Phenomenal.

This is a true jewel of a podcast. It successfully sheds light on many informatory issues and I’m constantly decompressing and warranting it with respectful listening. It takes an enlighten approach to its subjects and doesn’t on any account patronise it’s audience. Keep up the incredible work guys.

Salvia McGwin ,

Volume is so low

Great to listen to these guys and their guests talk about film but the volume is so low it is actually really difficult.
Please fix this!

BizzoH ,

Fascinating

Just discovered this courtesy of my son who's studying film at Falmouth. They certainly bring the subject to life, excellent!

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