254 episodes

The Energy Show, hosted by Barry Cinnamon, is a weekly 30 minute talk show that runs every Saturday on KDOW Radio AM in San Jose California.

Every week Barry provides practical money-saving tips on ways to reduce your home and business energy consumption.

Barry Cinnamon heads up Cinnamon Energy Systems (a San Jose residential and commercial  solar and energy storage contractor) and Spice Solar (suppliers of built-in solar racking technology). After 10,000+ installations at Akeena Solar and Westinghouse Solar, he's developed a pretty good perspective on the real-world economics of rooftop solar -- as well as the best products and services for homeowners, manufacturers and installers. His rooftop tinkering led to the development of integrated racking (released in 2007), AC solar modules (released in 2009), and Spice Solar (the fastest way to install rooftop solar modules).

The Energy Show Barry Cinnamon 366248

    • Technology
    • 3.7, 3 Ratings

The Energy Show, hosted by Barry Cinnamon, is a weekly 30 minute talk show that runs every Saturday on KDOW Radio AM in San Jose California.

Every week Barry provides practical money-saving tips on ways to reduce your home and business energy consumption.

Barry Cinnamon heads up Cinnamon Energy Systems (a San Jose residential and commercial  solar and energy storage contractor) and Spice Solar (suppliers of built-in solar racking technology). After 10,000+ installations at Akeena Solar and Westinghouse Solar, he's developed a pretty good perspective on the real-world economics of rooftop solar -- as well as the best products and services for homeowners, manufacturers and installers. His rooftop tinkering led to the development of integrated racking (released in 2007), AC solar modules (released in 2009), and Spice Solar (the fastest way to install rooftop solar modules).

    Covid-19 Impacts on the Solar Industry

    Covid-19 Impacts on the Solar Industry

    Copyright 2020 - The Energy Show, Barry CInnamon

    Like every other industry, the Covid-19 impacts on the solar industry have been significant. Supply chains have been disrupted, customer demand has decreased as economies suffer, and then, customer demand has gone up as people realize they need their own reliable source of power. And, there is a big question mark on government policies towards clean energy –especially here in the U.S.

    People in the global solar and storage industry want information to help them navigate these uncertain times and one of the best information sources in the solar industry is IHS Markit. IHS Markit is a leading provider of data analytics and expertise serving a number of industries including cleantech and renewables, oil and gas, automotive, financial and economics and my guest on this week’s Energy Show is Cormac Gilligan, Associate Director of Solar and Energy Storage at IHS Markit. Cormac is like a human crystal ball for the global solar industry and is widely regarded as a leading authority on the global PV inverter market. His analysis and commentary is regularly published by leading PV industry media and the global press.

    Given Covid-19 impacts on the solar industry, we could all use some accurate forecasting, so please listen up to this week’s Energy Show.

    • 35 min
    Design Considerations for Solar Battery Backup Systems

    Design Considerations for Solar Battery Backup Systems

    Copyright 2020, The Energy Show - Barry Cinnamon

    Solar and battery backup systems are the ideal antidote to the triple threat of high evening electric rates (over $0.50/kwh), frequent power failures (some of which are deliberate shut-offs), and our increasing dependence on electricity for the necessities of life (food, phones and fun).

    Several established companies — including Tesla, LG-Chem, SolarEdge and Enphase — have developed excellent solar and storage systems for homeowners. These systems are great, but they must be designed properly so that they meet both the power (watts) and energy (kwh) needs of a home during an extended blackout.

    Please listen to this week’s Energy Show as we talk about the evolution of battery storage technology, how solar and batteries work together, the technical limitations of storage systems, and the critical software and hardware components that factor into design considerations for battery backup systems that will reliably keep your lights on and your fridge cold.

    • 20 min
    Meeting Customer’s Changing Energy Needs - Renova Energy

    Meeting Customer’s Changing Energy Needs - Renova Energy

    Copyright 2020 - The Energy Show, Barry Cinnamon

    The solar industry is used to rapid changes, hence the moniker “The Solar Coaster.” But this year the changes are at their most extreme in my recollection: rapid adoption of battery storage, tariffs, blackouts, the coronavirus pandemic and a recession.

    It takes a varied set of skills to run a successful solar business over the long term in such a dynamic environment. Not only does a company need the right mix of technology, marketing and strategy, but they also need a management team that is focused on long term success. Companies that are in for the quick buck, featuring n low prices and “free” solar deals, usually disappear just as quickly.

    Over the past decade I’ve gotten to know some of the best locally-focused solar companies around the country. One of the companies that stands out is Renova Energy, based on the Coachella Valley in California.

    Please listen up to this week’s Energy Show featuring Vincent Battaglia, CEO of Renova Energy. Vincent shares his perspectives on meeting customer's changing energy needs, the future of the solar industry, and his insights into the keys to long-term success in the solar and storage industry.

    • 37 min
    Sustainable Solar Development - Inovateus Solar

    Sustainable Solar Development - Inovateus Solar

    Copyright 2020 - The Energy Show, Barry Cinnamon

    Today’s solar technology is the most sustainable way of generating energy. Solar power is inexpensive on a kilowatt per hour basis, is low maintenance, has zero fuel requirements, generates no emissions, and is completely silent.

    But even solar leaves a waste footprint, primarily because there is a lot of equipment that is manufactured and installed. Energy is consumed during component and equipment manufacturing, shipment and installation — whether on a utility-scale field, commercial flat roof or home. Waste is inevitably generated, especially packaging materials (I was kicked out of my first home office because we were recycling too much cardboard).

    Perhaps the biggest waste footprint issues will arise when solar installations are de-commissioned at the end of their life. Aluminum and steel racking can be profitably recycled. However, as with many other consumer and industrial products (tires, electronics, etc.), there are significant costs associated with shipping and recycling solar panels. It is not an easy process to separate the aluminum, glass and silicon that are the primary components of solar panels.

    This all comes back to the concept of sustainable solar development, and in the solar industry, sustainability is more than just a buzzword. We strive to walk the talk. As a result, most solar companies have solar panels on their roof, use EVs in their fleet and are compulsive about recycling.

    Our guest on this week’s Energy Show is TJ Kanczuzewski, CEO of Inovateus Solar. Based in South Bend, Indiana, Inovateus is emphasizing corporate sustainability on all of their projects. Please listen up to this week’s Energy Show as TJ discusses how Inovateus Solar has established their sustainability plan, and how they are extending sustainable solar development for their projects and with business partners.

    • 25 min
    Span Electric Panel with Arch Rao

    Span Electric Panel with Arch Rao

    Copyright 2020 - The Energy Show, Barry Cinnamon

    With the upcoming wildfire season in California and Covid-19 stay-at-home requirements, many people are looking into ways to power their home when utility power goes out. Battery backup systems coupled with rooftop solar are an ideal solution to keeping the lights on during these blackouts. Although these battery backup systems are affordable, quiet and clean — there are limits to the amount of power they can provide.

    We all have had experiences with the limited energy capacity of batteries — neither our phones nor EVs seem to run as long as we would like. Moreover, we know that battery-powered devices cannot provide as much power (sometimes referred to as in more technical terms as “oomph”) as devices that have cords plugged into the wall. These limitations are based on both the energy capacity in the battery (measured in kwh), as well as the power delivery capacity of the battery (measured in watts).

    Large appliances in homes presents the biggest challenge to powering a whole house with battery power. Power requirements for a central AC, electric oven/stove, pool pumps or EV chargers can be over 5,000 watts each. If these appliances were to be powered by a battery backup system with a 10 kwh or 13.5 kwh battery, that battery would be discharged completely within a few hours — leaving no more energy for more essential items such as refrigerators, lighting and computers. Of course, a determined DIY homeowner could turn off the circuit breakers to these appliances when the power goes out. But this approach does not work if the blackout occurs at night or when no one is home.

    To solve this problem, Span has developed a “smart” electrical panel that provides detailed control and monitoring over every single electric circuit in your house. Arch Rao, CEO of Span, is our guest on this week’s Energy Show. Prior to founding Span, Arch was head of products at Tesla Energy, working on their PowerWall, and previously he was at the Westly Group and Stanford University. Please join me as Arch explains how Span makes home energy connected and intuitive with a smart electrical panel.

    • 25 min
    New Normal as we Recover from the Corona Virus

    New Normal as we Recover from the Corona Virus

    Copyright 2020 - The Energy Show, Barry Cinnamon

    Everyone is looking forward to a return to some degree of normalcy as we recover from the corona virus pandemic. But it is very hard to make sense what a new normal would be with all the conflicting information from health, economic and policy experts — not to mention the almost diametrically opposed viewpoints expressed in various media outlets.

    The reality is that the progression of the corona virus will dictate the pace at which we will return to normal. Unfortunately, there are just way too many variables — on a worldwide basis — to predict when the corona virus will be reduced to a manageable level, perhaps like the flu or common cold.

    I’m not a medical or economic or political expert — but I do know a bit about energy, solar and storage. As a result of the corona virus, the solar + storage industry has been on an extreme version of the Solar Coaster. Like most businesses, almost all solar and battery companies were completely shut down for a few weeks in the March/April time frame.

    Since energy systems are generally considered “essential infrastructure,” many companies were able to restart as long as they followed applicable social distancing protocols. Unfortunately, local building departments have been slow to resume their permitting and inspection activities. More troubling has been that utility processing of interconnections has been extremely slow; our local utility continues to find virtually every excuse to delay solar and storage installations and increase costs.

    Fortunately, the supply chain for solar and storage equipment has been pretty good — so far. Most companies have not experienced any significant shortages of solar panels, inverters or batteries. But the increased need for home and business backup power — coupled with the upcoming wildfire season here in California — is increasing the demand for battery backup systems. As a result, the biggest “supply chain” limitation that most contractors are experiencing relates to the availability of experienced solar and battery installers.

    So please listen up to this week’s Energy Show as we discuss the changes the solar industry has experienced during the corona virus pandemic, and our outlook on the future as we move toward the “new normal.”

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

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3 Ratings

3 Ratings

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SolarEdge took the show over

I have been listening to the podcast and watched some conferences hosted by Barry Cinnamon for w while now. Recently it seems that SolarEdge Technologies have taken over the whole fact checking of the show. The last episode is a an example of it. „The largest inverter supplier” or implications that “there is not a lot of choice in the market” followed by “you are understating the benefits of SolarEdge”. All of it has no basis in data.
Barry lost credibility for me, which is a shame, as he clearly is a great specialist in PV field.

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