43 episodes

“The best podcast for women” — The Balance | “A must listen podcast for anyone who is ready to change the status quo” — Forbes | The Fairer Cents: Women, Money and the Fight to Break Even. This is a finance and career podcast all about the different economic realities facing women, people of color and other marginalized groups. Hosted by Tanja Hester, author of Work Optional: Retire Early the Non-Penny-Pinching Way and creator of the Our Next Life early retirement blog, and Kara Perez, founder of women's financial literacy startup Bravely, The Fairer Cents tackles sticky money and financial issues like the wage and wealth gap, the economics of motherhood, emotional labor, women's ambition and more. We don't shy away from hard conversations, but we do it all with laughter, and always with a focus on what action you can take in your own life. That's why we've been recommended by US News, Forbes, Essence, The Balance, Mic, GoBankingRates and many more. Subscribe now.

The Fairer Cents The Fairer Cents

    • Careers

“The best podcast for women” — The Balance | “A must listen podcast for anyone who is ready to change the status quo” — Forbes | The Fairer Cents: Women, Money and the Fight to Break Even. This is a finance and career podcast all about the different economic realities facing women, people of color and other marginalized groups. Hosted by Tanja Hester, author of Work Optional: Retire Early the Non-Penny-Pinching Way and creator of the Our Next Life early retirement blog, and Kara Perez, founder of women's financial literacy startup Bravely, The Fairer Cents tackles sticky money and financial issues like the wage and wealth gap, the economics of motherhood, emotional labor, women's ambition and more. We don't shy away from hard conversations, but we do it all with laughter, and always with a focus on what action you can take in your own life. That's why we've been recommended by US News, Forbes, Essence, The Balance, Mic, GoBankingRates and many more. Subscribe now.

    #36 - Women’s Voices, Part 2: Our Actual Voices

    #36 - Women’s Voices, Part 2: Our Actual Voices

    This is the second part in a two-part series on women speaking, focusing today on our actual voices and how they are heard (or not heard) by our bias-filled culture. There is a ton of research showing that women and men are perceived differently when we speak, and that's both socially wired and generational. Like in so many parts of the economy, women are held to an impossible standard where you lose no matter what: either you're too assertive or you're not assertive enough. You're not authoritative enough or you're bossy. Our guests are Kristen Meinzer (host of the By the Book podcast along with Jolenta Greenberg, and author of the book "So You Want to Start a Podcast: Finding Your Voice, Telling Your Story, and Building a Community that Will Listen" and, along with Jolenta, the forthcoming book "How to Be Fine: What We Learned from Living by the Rules of 50 Self-Help Books") and Tamara Keith (National Public Radio's White House correspondent and host of the NPR Politics Podcast). While not every woman needs to speak on the air like they both do, their experience tells us a lot about what women are up against in our economy when we speak.
    Links from the episode:
    Kristen Meinzer on Twitter Kristen’s book, So You Want to Start a Podcast By the Book podcast Tamara Keith on Twitter NPR Politics podcast Katie Mingle’s autoreply at 99 Percent Invisible  Study on vocal fry and success of young women in the labor market Study on preference for leaders with masculine voices This American Life piece on vocal fry and women’s voices: “Freedom Fries” Fresh Air interview on policing young women’s voices NPR story: “Sounding Like a Reporter – And a Real Person, Too” Transom.org opinion piece by Chenjerai Kumanyika about vocal color in public radio Naomi Wolf’s misguided Guardian piece on women’s voices Fast Company piece victim blaming women for our voices and how others discriminate on that basis Atlantic story on bias against women’s voices in hiring

    • 55 min
    #35 - Women’s Voices, Part 1: Speaking Up

    #35 - Women’s Voices, Part 1: Speaking Up

    This is the first part in a two-part series that is years in the making, and a topic close to our hearts. The fact is that when women and people from marginalized groups speak, it’s heard differently than it is when men speak. So we’re digging into that, today starting with the more figurative meaning of women’s voices, as in women daring to speak up and fight for something they believe in. Our guests are Noami Grevemberg who Instagrams about the lack of inclusivity in #vanlife at @irietoaurora, and Julia, a trans woman suing the state of North Carolina for its discriminatory health care policies that specifically target transgender people. Both of them are speaking up and willing to be visible even though it’s not always safe to do so, and we talked to them about weighing the risks -- including the financial risks -- of speaking up against what we all gain when women speak up in spite of those risks. In part 2, coming in two weeks, we’re talking about women’s actual voices, how the world hears us, and how we can push back.
     
    Links from the episode:
    Diversify Vanlife essay on GnomadHome.com Noami on Instagram Julia’s Twitter account

    • 47 min
    #34 - The Economics of Reproduction, Part 2: All the Costs of Giving Birth

    #34 - The Economics of Reproduction, Part 2: All the Costs of Giving Birth

    Today we’re completing the two-part series on the economic implications of reproducing, talking about the costs – often mysterious -- of giving birth for women and others who can get pregnant, especially in the U.S. In this episode, Kara talks to Carol Sakala from the National Partnership for Women & Families about the actual costs of delivering a baby, and shares an audio essay on the range of known and unknown stats a mother must contend with when pondering the costs of delivery. We’d love to hear your thoughts on the episode, so please email us at fairercents@gmail.com or hit us up on Twitter or Instagram at @fairercents. Thanks to our sponsor Freshbooks for their support of the show.
    Links:
    Carol Sakala, director of childbirth connection programs at the National Partnership for Women & Families Vox video on the mysterious costs of giving birth The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecolegists position paper on home births

    • 43 min
    #33 - The Economics of Reproduction, Part 1: The Choice Not to Give Birth

    #33 - The Economics of Reproduction, Part 1: The Choice Not to Give Birth

    Today’s show is the first in a two-part series all about the economic implications of reproducing — or not reproducing. On the next episode, we’ll talk about the wide range of financial implications of giving birth for women and others who can get pregnant, but today we’re talking about the massive financial impacts of not being forced to have children you don’t want to have for any number of reasons, impacts that go well beyond women themselves. In this episode, Tanja talks to Brigette Courtot of Urban Institute about the economic impacts on women of having access to birth control, and Kara talks to Anna Bernstein of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research about the economic impacts of abortion. Thanks to our sponsors Upstart and Freshbooks for their support of the show.
     
    Links:
    Urban Institute Health Policy Center reproductive health and access data and analysis Brigette Courtot’s bio and publications Anna Bernstein’s bio and publications IWPR’s Fact Sheet: “The Economic Effects of Contraceptive Access: A Review of the Evidence” New York Times piece by Lyndsay Werking-Yip: “I Had a Late-Term Abortion. I Am Not a Monster.” Vox piece by Dr. Cheryl Axelrod: “I’m an OB-GYN who had a 2nd-trimester abortion. The 20-week ban bill is dangerous.” Slate piece by Margot Finn: “I Had a Late-Term Abortion. President Trump and Pro-Lifers Have No Right to Call Me a Murderer.” From The Guardian: “Ohio bill orders doctors to ‘reimplant ectopic pregnancy’ or face ‘abortion murder’ charges”

    • 42 min
    #32 - The Economics of Wellness, Part 2: A Diet By Any Other Name

    #32 - The Economics of Wellness, Part 2: A Diet By Any Other Name

    This week, we conclude our two-part series on wellness by focusing on diet and weight loss, the real centerpiece of the entire wellness industry. Just how big a business it is, the lengths the industry goes to to hide itself, and how it hurts us as women in particular. Feminist dietician Rachael Hartley talks to us about how we’ve focused too much on diet and fitness in our quest to be healthier (or, really, thinner), and Tanja looks at the fat phobia that’s the real motivator behind so much of our wellness and weight loss obsession. Big thanks to Freshbooks for sponsoring season 4 of The Fairer Cents. If you’d like to try their cloud accounting software for free, go to freshbooks.com/tfc and enter “the fairer cents” in the How did you hear about us?
    Links from the episode:
    Smash the Wellness Industry by Jessica Knoll in the New York Times Rachael Hartley Nutrition Rachael Hartley on Instagram Rachael on Twitter Rachael’s blog post on Food, Dieting & Feminism Huff Post piece by Michael Hobbes, “Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong” Diet industry research French women would rather be fat than dead Yale research on trading life or limb not to be fat Melinda Parrish video on Huff Post Stephanie Shames TEDx talk Samantha Bee Full Frontal clip

    • 51 min
    #31 - The Economics of Wellness, Part 1: Women & Yoga Culture

    #31 - The Economics of Wellness, Part 1: Women & Yoga Culture

    This week’s show is part 1 of a 2-part series on the wellness industrial complex, and all the ways it manipulates women and makes us poorer. First up, we’re tackling yoga culture in particular, because of how ubiquitous it has become in western society, and just how problematic that is. We talk with Tejal Patel and Jesal Parikh of the Yoga Is Dead podcast about how yoga has been culturally appropriated from its roots in India and from Desi people today, and Tanja draws on her long career teaching yoga to delve into yoga’s problems with economics and inclusivity. Big thanks to Freshbooks for sponsoring season 4 of The Fairer Cents. If you’d like to try their cloud accounting software for free, go to freshbooks.com/tfc and enter “the fairer cents” in the How did you hear about us?
      Links from the episode:
    Yoga Is Dead podcast Yoga Is Dead on Instagram Tanja’s piece on Our Next Life, “How Teaching Yoga Is Like Multilevel Marketing” Yoga Alliance and Ipsos 2014 survey International Association of Yoga Therapists 2004 study The Billfold piece by Jessica Pishko, “Spiritually Bankrupt: How I Went Broke Trying to Teach Yoga” PayScale data on yoga instructor hourly pay Atlantic piece by Rosalie Murphy, “Why Your Yoga Class Is So White” Yoga Journal piece by Rina Deshpande, “What’s the Difference Between Cultural Appropriation and Cultural Appreciation?” “(More) Reasons Why Your Yoga Class Is So White” by Chanelle John on Decolonizing Yoga
    “The cover shoot that brought me face to face with racism in the wellness industry,” by Nicole Cardoza in Quartz “Jessamyn Stanley and the Yoga Journal Debacle” on Yoga for All Training blog

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

emmajaynes ,

Obsessively recommend this (#notspon)

It was a happy accident that I stumbled on Kara and Tanja’s podcast in early 2018 and I’ve been obsessively recommending it to my friends, colleagues and family ever since (and I’ve no intentions of stopping doing so in 2019).

If you listen to financial podcasts, keep your ears and mind open. You can’t expect advice, steps to wealth, strategies for FIRE or debt slaying (although Tanja and Kara have experienced perspectives on both).

What you can expect are intelligent, provocative and raw conversations from a varied set of perspectives that need to form part of our essential listening when it comes to understanding women and money.

Tanja and Kara keep it light but refreshingly real when discussing sensitive issues and I’m so thankful to have uncovered this gem of a podcast.

Wholeheartedly looking forward to season 3 (gentle hint).

Top Podcasts In Careers

Listeners Also Subscribed To