684 episodes

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence from The Economist The Economist

    • News
    • 4.6 • 996 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Clubs seal: China’s view as alliances multiply

    Clubs seal: China’s view as alliances multiply

    Leaders of “the Quad” are meeting in person for the first time; drama from the AUKUS alliance still simmers. Our Beijing bureau chief discusses how Chinese officials see all these club ties. As Chancellor Angela Merkel’s time in office wanes, we assess Germany’s many challenges she leaves behind. And the sweet, sweet history of baklava, a Middle Eastern treat gone global.
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    • 23 min
    Same assembly, rewired: the United Nations meets

    Same assembly, rewired: the United Nations meets

    The annual United Nations General Assembly is more than just worthy pledges and fancy dinners; we ask where the tensions and the opportunities lie this time around. Last year’s fears of a crippling “twindemic” of covid-19 and influenza proved unfounded—and that provides more reason to worry this year. And why “like” is, like, really useful. 
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    • 22 min
    The homes stretch: Evergrande

    The homes stretch: Evergrande

    China’s property behemoth has slammed up against new rules on its giant debt pile. We ask what wider risks it now poses as a cash crunch bites. Britain has begun a demographic trend unusual in the rich world: its share of young people is spiking—and will be for a decade. And what the pandemic has done for the future of office-wear.
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    • 19 min
    Running to stand still: Canada’s election

    Running to stand still: Canada’s election

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remains in power after Monday’s election, but he emerges without the majority he wanted, and with his soft power damaged. He now faces a fourth wave of the pandemic and an emboldened far-right from a weaker position. Child labour fell markedly in the 16 years after the turn of the millennium. Now it’s on the rise again. Efforts to prevent children from working can often exacerbate the problem. And we consider one of the more unusual ideas for combating climate change: potty-training cows.
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    • 20 min
    Potemkin polls: Russia’s elections

    Potemkin polls: Russia’s elections

    The winner of Russia’s elections was not in doubt. Vladimir Putin’s party, United Russia, came out on top. But despite the ballot stuffing and repression, the opposition still managed to rattle the Kremlin. The Gates Foundation is America’s biggest charitable foundation by far and a powerhouse in the world of public health. But its money could be better spent. And we read the tea leaves to explain why bugs are important for your brew. 
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    • 21 min
    Sub plot: the AUKUS alliance

    Sub plot: the AUKUS alliance

    The alliance between America, Britain and Australia has enormous significance, most of all for its nuclear-submarine provisions. We look at the global realignment it represents. The container-shipping industry has had a wild year and its prices reflect the vast disarray; we ask whether things will, or should, get back to normal. And the growing trend of politicians’ media-production companies.
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    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
996 Ratings

996 Ratings

miceal mc govern ,

The economist

A joy to listen to thoughtful reports focused and real economic issues as they arise. Thanks. Miceal mc govern

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Informative, well produced

I’m a long time admirer of the show. This special feature on Lebanon was exceptionally fantastic. What great production! Keep it up!

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Great

A very calm and informitive views of current news events.

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