11 episodes

The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen.


Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic. 

The Jab from Economist Radio The Economist

    • News
    • 4.1 • 69 Ratings

The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen.


Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic. 

    The Jab: Can Europe turn the corner?

    The Jab: Can Europe turn the corner?

    The continent is suffering a third wave of covid-19 after the European Commission’s vaccine roll out stalled. French President Emmanuelle Macron has said Europe “lacked ambition” in its vaccine efforts. How can European countries catch up?
     
    Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, Stanley Pignal, European business and finance correspondent, and Sondre Solstad, senior data journalist.
     
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 35 min
    The Jab: How to persuade the sceptics?

    The Jab: How to persuade the sceptics?

    All adults in America are now eligible for a covid-19 vaccine. Around 30% of those polled in the country, however, are hesitant to take the jab. A shortage of vaccines will soon become a shortage of arms. What is the best way to persuade reluctant citizens to get inoculated?
     
    We speak to Heidi Larson, anthropologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and founding director of the Vaccine Confidence Project, about the similarities between vaccine hesitancy today and the 19th century. Crystal Son, director of healthcare analytics at Civis Analytics, on why vaccine safety messaging is ineffective.
     
    Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Tamara Gilkes Borr, US policy correspondent.
     
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 39 min
    The Jab: Can distribution be fair?

    The Jab: Can distribution be fair?

    More than a billion doses of covid-19 vaccine have been made. Now comes the hard part: ensuring every country in the world has access to them. Can distribution be made more equitable? 
     
    Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Sondre Solstad, senior data journalist.
     
    With Seth Berkley of GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, and John Nkengasong, director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.
     
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts 
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 40 min
    The Jab: How will science benefit?

    The Jab: How will science benefit?

    The concerted and rapid efforts to counter covid-19 have turbo-charged scientific progress. How can this new knowledge be applied to treat future threats to human health? 
     
    Gregg Glenn, head of research and development at Novavax on why that vaccine is effective against variants. 
     
    Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Oliver Morton, briefings editor, Cuba correspondent Roseanne Lake and James Fransham from our data team join them.
     
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts  
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 39 min
    The Jab: Will America do better than Europe?

    The Jab: Will America do better than Europe?

    The EU was slow to roll out covid-19 vaccines, then destroyed confidence in the Astrazeneca vaccine and is now embroiled in a row over supplies. Will America avoid Europe's pitfalls? Dr Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to President Biden, explains vaccination progress in America, the plateau of new infections and his plan to combat new variants. Also, how does America's federal system affect the vaccination programme?


    Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Edward Carr, The Economist's deputy editor and our New York correspondent Rosemarie Ward join them.


    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 44 min
    The Jab: How will behaviour change?

    The Jab: How will behaviour change?

    The world has stumbled through the pandemic by nationalising risk. In heavily infected countries citizens have been ordered to stay home for weeks at a time. As covid-19 vaccination programmes spread, governments must gradually restore choice to the individual. How?


    We speak to Ozlem Tureci and Ugur Sahin—the couple who co-founded BioNTech which created the first covid-19 vaccine to get regulatory approval. 


    Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. The Economist's deputy editor Edward Carr, Europe correspondent Vendeline Von Bredow and Dan Rosenheck from our data team join them.


    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

Linholder13 ,

A very informative - and spin free! - start

Great to have a short overview of the global situation on the roll out of vaccinations. Especially important is that is free from political spin. Looking forward to future episodes.

ST KARL THE BEWILDERED ,

Ridiculous Music

Please stop with the utterly pathetic music you add in reference to each countries pandemic effort. It’s unbelievably irritating. Oh and not the remotest bit interesting or clever.

Amel2214 ,

Thorough and brilliant

Well researched, brilliantly presented. A powerful source of information about the pandemic

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