100 episodes

The Literary License Podcast Explores the Book to Screen and Everything Inbetween

The Literary License Podcast Literary License Podcast

    • TV & Film
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

The Literary License Podcast Explores the Book to Screen and Everything Inbetween

    Season 6: Episode 277 - M&M: Double Indemnity (1944)/Basic Instinct (1992)

    Season 6: Episode 277 - M&M: Double Indemnity (1944)/Basic Instinct (1992)

    Double Indemnity (1944)


    Double Indemnity is a 1944 American crime film noir directed by Billy Wilder, co-written by Wilder and Raymond Chandler, and produced by Buddy DeSylva and Joseph Sistrom. The screenplay was based on James M. Cain's 1943 novel of the same title, which appeared as an eight-part serial for the Liberty magazine in February 1936.  The film stars Fred MacMurray as an insurance salesman, Barbara Stanwyck as a provocative housewife who is accused of killing her husband, and Edward G. Robinson as a claims adjuster whose job is to find phony claims. The term "double indemnity" refers to a clause in certain life insurance policies that doubles the payout in cases when the death is accidental.  Praised by many critics when first released, the film was nominated for seven Academy Awards but did not win any. Widely regarded as a classic, it often is cited as having set the standard for film noir.

    Basic Instinct (1992)
     
    Basic Instinct is a 1992 neo-noir erotic thriller film directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Joe Eszterhas. The film follows San Francisco police detective Nick Curran (Michael Douglas), who is investigating the brutal murder of a wealthy rock star. During the investigation, Curran becomes involved in a torrid and intense relationship with the prime suspect, Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone), an enigmatic writer.  Eszterhas developed the script in the 1980s. It became a subject of a bidding war until Carolco Pictures acquired the rights to the film. From there, Verhoeven signed on to direct and Douglas and Stone joined the project, after many actresses were considered for the role of Tramell. Before its release, Basic Instinct generated controversy due to its overt sexuality and violence, including a rape scene. Gay rights activists criticized the film's depiction of homosexual relationships and the portrayal of a bisexual woman as a murderous psychopath. In one scene, Stone's vulva was filmed as she crossed her legs, which she claimed was done without her knowledge, a claim denied by the director.  There are several cuts available. 
     
    Opening Credits; Introduction (1.05); Amazing Design Advertisement (20.54); Background History (22.06); Double Indemnity (1944) Film Trailer (23.41); The Original (25.54); Let's Rate (1:19.08); Introducing the Double Feature (1:36.27); Basic Instinct (1992) Film Trailer (1:39.07); The Attraction (1:41.16); How Many Stars (2:37.14); End Credits (2:41.56); Closing Credits (2:43.10)
     
    Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – copyright 2021. All rights reserved
     
    Closing Credits:  Man Smart, Women Smarter – by Harry Belafonte. Taken from the album Calypso.  Copyright 1955 RCA Victor

    Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 
     
    All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.
     
    All songs available through Amazon Music.

    • 2 hrs 46 min
    Season 6: Episode 274 - MAKE/REMAKE: The Women (1939)/The Opposite Sex (1956)

    Season 6: Episode 274 - MAKE/REMAKE: The Women (1939)/The Opposite Sex (1956)

    The Women (1939)

    The Women is a 1939 American comedy-drama film directed by George Cukor. The film is based on Clare Boothe Luce's 1936 play of the same name, and was adapted for the screen by Anita Loos and Jane Murfin, who had to make the film acceptable for the Production Code for it to be released.  The film stars Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rosalind Russell, Paulette Goddard, Joan Fontaine, Lucile Watson, Mary Boland, Florence Nash, and Virginia Grey. Marjorie Main and Phyllis Povah also appear, reprising their stage roles from the play. Ruth Hussey, Virginia Weidler, Butterfly McQueen, and Hedda Hopper also appear in smaller roles. Fontaine was the last surviving actress with a credited role in the film; she died in 2013. It is also important to note that even the animals and pets are all female.  The film continued the play's all-female tradition—the entire cast of more than 130 speaking roles was female. Set in the glamorous Manhattan apartments of high society evoked by Cedric Gibbons, and in Reno, Nevada, where they obtain their divorces, it presents an acidic commentary on the pampered lives and power struggles of various rich, bored wives and other women they come into contact with.  Filmed in black and white, it includes a six-minute fashion parade filmed in Technicolor, featuring Adrian's most outré designs; often cut in modern screenings, it has been restored by Turner Classic Movies. On DVD, the original black-and-white fashion show, which is a different take, is available for the first time.

    The Opposite Sex (1956)
     
    The Opposite Sex is a 1956 American musical romantic comedy film shot in Metrocolor and CinemaScope.[3][4] The film was directed by David Miller and stars June Allyson, Joan Collins, Dolores Gray, Ann Sheridan, and Ann Miller, with Leslie Nielsen, Jeff Richards, Agnes Moorehead, Charlotte Greenwood, Joan Blondell, and Sam Levene.

    The Opposite Sex is a remake of the 1939 comedy film The Women. Both films are based on Clare Boothe Luce's original 1936 play.

    Unlike the 1936 play and the 1939 film adaptation, The Opposite Sex includes musical numbers and features male actors who portray the husbands and boyfriends, whose characters were only referred to in the previous film and stage versions.[6] This alters the structure and tone of the base storyline significantly.
     
    Opening Credits; Introduction (.37); Background History (42.13);The Women (1939) Film Trailer (44.51); The Original (48.16); Let's Rate (1:43.07); Amazing Design (1:59.54); Introducing a Remake (2:01.07); The Opposite Sex (1956) Film Trailer (2:01.41); The Remake (2:05.22); How Many Stars (2:44.07); End Credits (2:58.26); Closing Credits (3:00.39)
     
    Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – copyright 2021. All rights reserved
     
    Closing Credits:  There’s Always A Woman – by Kaye Ballard and Sally Mayes  Taken from the album Unsung Sondheim. Copyright 1993 Varese Sarabande

    Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 
     
    All rights reserved.  Used with Kind Permission
     
    All songs available through Amazon Music.

    • 3 hrs 3 min
    Season 6: Episode 276 - DOCTOR WHO: The Daleks Part 2

    Season 6: Episode 276 - DOCTOR WHO: The Daleks Part 2

    The Daleks – Part 2
     
    21 December 1963 – 1 February 1964
     
    Episodes 5 – 7
     
    The Expedition
    The Ordeal
    The Rescue
     
    The Doctor, his granddaughter Susan Foreman and her teachers Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright land in an alien jungle and are captured by the Daleks, a race of mutated creatures who survive off the radiation that remains in the atmosphere after a nuclear war with their enemies. As the group attempt to escape the Daleks, they discover more about the planet and the ensuing war and attempt to broker a peace.
     
    Opening Credits; Introduction (1.29); Plot Synopsis (8.19); Let's Discuss (10.49); Amazing Design Advertisement (57.27); Favourite and Least Favourite Character (58.39); Let's Rate (1:06.49); Tune In Next Time (1:12.41); Closing Credits (1:15.17)
     
    Opening Credits– Doctor Who Theme. composer Ron Grainer and realised by Delia Derbyshire at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Copyright 1963 BBC World Music.
     
    Closing Credits:  Cause I’m a Blonde – by Julie Brown.  Taken from the album Goddess in Progress.  Copyright 1984 Rhino Records

    Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 
     
    All rights reserved

    Used with Kind Permission.
     
    All songs available through Amazon Music.
     
     

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Season 6: Episode 275 - BATMAN: Be A Clown/Two Face Part 1 & 2/It’s Never Too Late

    Season 6: Episode 275 - BATMAN: Be A Clown/Two Face Part 1 & 2/It’s Never Too Late

    Be A Clown 
     
    Mayor Hamilton Hill's miserable son, Jordan, becomes even sadder when his father uses his birthday party as a political gathering rather than a normal celebration, and ends up stowing away in the truck of the party clown hired by Hill for the party, whom he doesn't know is actually the Joker in disguise. It is now up to Batman, whom Mayor Hill distrusts, to rescue the boy before it is too late.
    Two Face Part 1
     
    Mobster Rupert Thorne attempts to use Harvey Dent's secret split personality to blackmail him. But when Dent meets with Thorne at a chemical plant, "Big Bad Harv" takes over, and the resulting confrontation leads to an explosion that horribly scars half of Dent's face and his entire body.
    Two Face Part 2
     
    Harvey Dent, now calling himself Two-Face, resurfaces and starts robbing Rupert Thorne's illegal businesses, preparing for a final confrontation with the crime boss, and Batman must stop his former friend before he and Thorne kill each other.
    It’s Never Too Late
     
    A mob war between crime bosses Rupert Thorne and Arnold Stromwell is nearing its end, and comes to a climax when Stromwell is set up to be killed in an exploding restaurant by Thorne. Batman saves him at the last moment, and aided by Stromwell's brother (now a priest who lost his leg years before, an accident for which Stromwell carries a secret guilt), tries to persuade him to give up his life of crime and help the police bring Thorne down by testifying against him.
    Opening Credits; Introduction (1.29); Amazing Design Advertisement (45.31); Episode One:  Be A Clown (46.42); Episode Two:  Two-Face Part 1 (1:02.15); Episode Three:  Two-Face Part 2 (1:23.59); Episode Four:  It’s Never Too Late (1:48.34); Favourite Character (2:15.33); Favourite Episode (2:30.03); Same Bat Time, Same Bat Channel (2:34.11); Closing Credits (2:35.46)
     
    Opening Credits– Batman Animated Theme by Danny Elfman.  Copyright 1992 Warner Music 
     
    Closing Credits:  It’s Never Too Late by Kylie Minogue.  Taken from the album Enjoy Yourself.  Copyright 1989 PWL Records

    Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 
     
    Incidental Music:  Batman: The Animated Series by Shirley Walker. Copyright 1995 Warner Music International.
     
    All rights reserved.  Used with Kind Permission.
     
    All songs available through Amazon Music.

    • 2 hrs 39 min
    Season 6: Episode 273 - AMERICA GOES DARK: Gone Girl (G Flynn)/Gone Girl (2014)

    Season 6: Episode 273 - AMERICA GOES DARK: Gone Girl (G Flynn)/Gone Girl (2014)

    Book:  Gone Girl
        By Gillian Flynn
     
    Film:    Gone Girl (2014)
     
     
    Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn was published in June 2012 and become an instant success.  The sense of suspense in the novel would come whether Nick Dunne is responsible for the disappearance of his wife Amy.  The book would be told in three parts changing the point of view between the different parts.
     
    The film, directed by David Fincher and starring Rosamund Pike and Ben Affleck.  Set in Missouri, the story is a postmodern mystery that follows the events surrounding Nick Dunne who becomes the prime suspect in the sudden disappearance of his wife, Amy. The film also stars Neil Patrick Harris and Tyler Perry.  It would be the highest grossing film of David Fincher’s career earning $369million at the box office.
     
    Opening Credits; Introduction (2.33); Background History (6.50); Gone Girl Plot Synopsis (7.52); Book Thoughts(14.51); Let's Rate (41.41); Amazing Design Advertisement (42.33); Introducing a Film (43.44); Gone Girl Film Trailer (45.01); Lights, Camera, Action (47.28); How Many Stars (1:24.18); End Credits (1:26.06); Closing Credits (1:27.54)
     
    Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – copyright 2021. All rights reserved
     
    Closing Credits:  Bitch by Meredith Brookes.  Taken from the album Blurring the Edges.  Copyright 1997 Capitol-EMI Records

    Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 
     
    All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission
     
    All songs available through Amazon Music.

    • 1 hr 32 min
    Season 6: Episode 272 - M&M: Adele Blanc-Sec (2010)/A&C Meet The Mummy (1955)

    Season 6: Episode 272 - M&M: Adele Blanc-Sec (2010)/A&C Meet The Mummy (1955)

    The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec (2010)

     
    The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec  is a 2010 French fantasy adventure feature film written and directed by Luc Besson. It is loosely based on the comic book series The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec by Jacques Tardi and, as in the comic, follows the eponymous writer and a number of recurring side characters in a succession of far-fetched incidents in 1910s Paris and beyond, in this episode revolving around parapsychology and ultra-advanced Ancient Egyptian technology, which both pastiche and subvert adventure and speculative fiction of the period. The primarily live-action film, shot in Super 35, incorporates much use of computer animation to portray its fanciful elements and contemporary action film special and visual effects within the form of the older-style adventure films they have largely superseded.

    Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955)
     
    Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy is a 1955 horror comedy that would star the legendary team of Abbott and Costello making their final appearance in the Universal-International feature.  The film would also star stuntman Eddie Parker as the mummy who was Lon Chaney’s double in the previous mummy films.
     
     
    Opening Credits; Introduction (1.03); Background History (19.17); The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec (2010) Film Trailer (20.50); Discussing Our First Feature (22.21); Let's Rate (40.12); Amazing Design Advertisement (48.58); Introducing the Double Feature (50.09); The Abbott and Costello Meet The Mummy (1955) Film Trailer (50.28); The Attraction (52.34); How Many Stars (1:38.18);  End Credits (1:51.35); Closing Credits (1:52.58)
     
    Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – copyright 2021. All rights reserved
     
    Closing Credits:  Walk Like An Egyptian 12” remix – The Bangles from the album Different Light.  Copyright 1987 Columbia Bang-a-Lang Music

    Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 
     
    All rights reserved.
     
    All songs available through Amazon Music.

    • 1 hr 58 min

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