87 episodes

Welcome to The Lonely Palette, the podcast that returns art history to the masses, one painting at a time. Each episode, host Tamar Avishai picks a painting du jour, interviews unsuspecting museum visitors in front of it, and then dives deeply into the object, the movement, the social context, and anything and everything else that will make it as neat to you as it is to her. For more information, visit thelonelypalette.com | Twitter @lonelypalette | Instagram @thelonelypalette.

The Lonely Palette Tamar Avishai

    • Arts
    • 4.6 • 52 Ratings

Welcome to The Lonely Palette, the podcast that returns art history to the masses, one painting at a time. Each episode, host Tamar Avishai picks a painting du jour, interviews unsuspecting museum visitors in front of it, and then dives deeply into the object, the movement, the social context, and anything and everything else that will make it as neat to you as it is to her. For more information, visit thelonelypalette.com | Twitter @lonelypalette | Instagram @thelonelypalette.

    Ep. 55 - Harriet Powers' "Pictorial Quilt" (1895-98)

    Ep. 55 - Harriet Powers' "Pictorial Quilt" (1895-98)

    Quilts, and textiles in general, have a funny way of being overlooked by the fine art world. They’re dismissed as craft, as outsider, as “women’s work,” or as potentially uninteresting museum exhibits. But some quilts, and some quilters, tell their stories, explain our histories, and simply refuse to be denied.

    This episode was produced in partnership with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibition “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories” is on view until January 17, 2022.

    See the images:
    https://bit.ly/3jNT4FZ

    Music used:
    The Andrews Sisters, "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen"
    Blue Dot Sessions, “Moon Bicycle Theme,” “Stucco Blue,” “Coronea,” “Lumber Down,” “Velvet Ladder,” “Gale”

    Get tickets to the exhibition:
    https://bit.ly/3GAli0M

    Support the show:
    www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

    • 28 min
    Ep. 54 - Grant Wood's "American Gothic" (1930)

    Ep. 54 - Grant Wood's "American Gothic" (1930)

    A man. A woman. A window. A pitchfork. It’s the most seemingly straightforward double portrait to come out of rural America - and certainly the most famous - yet it’s become synonymous with ambiguity and mystery, parody and polarization. Amazing how hungry we are to turn a portrait of an artist’s hometown spirit into a portrait of a larger American cultural moment, both then and now.

    See the images:
    https://bit.ly/2WuV2CQ

    Music used:
    Django Reinhardt, “Django’s Tiger”
    The Andrews Sisters, "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen"
    The Blue Dot Sessions, “Long and Low Cloud,” “Hakodate Line,” “Cornicob,” “Sylvestor,” “Di Breun,” “The Silver Hatch,” “Speaker Joy”
    Joe Dassin, “Les Champs-Elysees"

    Support the show:
    www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

    • 31 min
    Re-ReleaseEp. 48 - Anselm Kiefer's "Margarete" and "Sulamith" (1981)

    Re-ReleaseEp. 48 - Anselm Kiefer's "Margarete" and "Sulamith" (1981)

    A year ago today, we released our most ambitious episode yet: an exploration of postwar German artist Anselm Kiefer's layered, dense, enormous canvases that themselves respond to the enormity of Holocaust survivor Paul Celan's layered, dense poem, "Todesfugue."

    In honor of it taking the gold in podcasting at the American Alliance of Museums' MuseWeb awards, we're re-releasing the episode, and with it the layers of metaphor and materials, texture and text, golden straw and blackened ash, that comprise the unimaginable.

    This episode was produced with support from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Learn more at www.sfmoma.com.

    See the images:
    bit.ly/31gUSwW

    Music used:
    The Blue Dot Sessions, “The Bus at Dawn,” “Silky,” Drone Pine,” “Tiny Bottles,” “Inamorata,” “Tapoco,” “The Summit,” “Cirrus,” “Derailed,” “Insatiable Toad,” “Dolly and Pad,” “A Pleasant Strike”

    John Williams, performed by Itzhak Perlman & Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, “Theme from Schindler’s List”

    Support the show:
    www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

    AAM MuseWeb award press release:
    https://bit.ly/37hItwi

    • 55 min
    BonusEp 0.5 - Tamar Avishai interviews Dr. Rachel Saunders, Harvard Art Museums

    BonusEp 0.5 - Tamar Avishai interviews Dr. Rachel Saunders, Harvard Art Museums

    Like so many of us, Dr. Rachel Saunders had a tough 2020. As the curator of Asian art at the Harvard Art Museums, she was thrilled to co-curate, with professor Yukio Lippit, the exhibition "Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection," the largest single exhibition the museum had ever mounted. And then, a month after its opening, it was shuttered by Covid, and remained closed until the entire exhibition came down early last month.

    But what could have been a bitter disappointment actually became exceptionally educational - perhaps par for the course at a prestigious university art museum, but with far-reaching implications for museums everywhere. Because when we talk about accessibility - and inaccessibility - in this context, we start to think about it in every context. How accessible are museums, ever? How authentically cross-cultural are our conversations? How do art historians wrestle with and decide on narratives? And how do we honor the multiplicity of these objects' histories while still making them present, today?

    I sat down with Dr. Saunders this past May, the last month that the exhibition was up on the gallery walls but still behind locked doors, and we dove into these issues and more.

    See the images discussed:
    https://bit.ly/3kQbAii

    Music used:
    The Blue Dot Sessions, “One Little Triumph,” “Sage the Hunter”

    Tamar’s exhibition review in the New York Review of Books:
    https://bit.ly/36X64Cg

    The Lonely Palette episode on Painting Edo:
    https://bit.ly/3iEFl2Q

    The HAM page on Painting Edo
    https://bit.ly/3zrYBY7

    Support the show!
    www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

    • 59 min
    LookWithYourEarsEp. 0.3: The Urban Sublime

    LookWithYourEarsEp. 0.3: The Urban Sublime

    The Lonely Palette is collaborating with the Addison Gallery of American Art in celebration of the museum's 90th anniversary! In this episode, we're using the Addison's collection to explore the American city in the same way that art history has been looking at landscape since time immemorial: what it represents, what stories it tells us about ourselves, what stories it leaves out, what it replaces, and how its relationship to the human figure is as fraught and dramatic as any relationship you'll ever find on a canvas.

    Artists Explored:
    Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Robert Frank, Berenice Abbott, Charles Sheeler, Martin Wong

    See the Images:
    bit.ly/34AE9Xw

    Music Used:
    The Blue Dot Sessions, “The Zeppelin,” “Towboat Theme,” “Cat’s Eye,” “PlainGrey,” “Dorica Theme,” “Tranceless”

    Further Listening:
    The Lonely Palette on Edward Hopper: https://bit.ly/3wyqg8Y

    Support the Show:
    www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

    • 23 min
    Ep. 53 - Painting Edo, Post-Pandemic

    Ep. 53 - Painting Edo, Post-Pandemic

    The world is reopening just as Harvard's special exhibition "Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection" is permanently closing, having been open to the public for one heartbreakingly short month. But the exhibition, which documented the Edo period in all its diverse, aesthetic richness, doesn't have to be in front of you to describe its uncannily Buddhist and modernist moment, or to share in the strange lightness of ours.

    This episode was produced with support from Harvard Art Museums.

    See the images:
    http://www.thelonelypalette.com/episodes/2021/6/5/episode-53-painting-edo-post-pandemic

    Music used:
    The Blue Dot Sessions, “Noe Noe,” “A Certain Lightness,” “Algea Trio,” “Kilkerrin,” “Gullwing Sailor,” “Two Dollar Token,” “Silent Flock”
    Billie Holiday, “Blue Moon”

    Support the show:
    www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
52 Ratings

52 Ratings

Rob McMinn ,

I know a lot about art but I don’t know what I like

Excellent podcast, beautifully produced.

olipackman ,

Perfect Art Podcast

Such an informative, interesting and well made podcast. I absolutely love the episodes I’ve listened to and I’m already worried for the day I’ll have finished them all. Exactly what I was looking for in an art history podcast and it’s really made me look at art in a new light.

Adamski198413 ,

Relaxed, non pretentious and easy listening

Thoughtful, insightful analysis that is well researched and a gateway to further research. Each episodes always causes me to pause and reflect.

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