1,335 episodes

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

The NPR Politics Podcast NPR Politics Podcast

    • News
    • 4.6 • 412 Ratings

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    American Democratic Norms Continue To Falter As Some Republicans Refuse To Concede

    American Democratic Norms Continue To Falter As Some Republicans Refuse To Concede

    Republican primary candidates who lost by substantial margins are refusing to concede their races — echoing Donald Trump's baseless claims of voter fraud and potentially setting up lucrative post-election fundraising schemes.

    This episode: congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Stephen Fowler, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.

    Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

    Connect:
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    • 14 min
    Planet Money: What's Causing Inflation?

    Planet Money: What's Causing Inflation?

    The last few months have made us acutely aware of inflation. We all agree that it's making our lives harder, but economists disagree about what's causing it.

    A special episode from our friends at Planet Money: https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510289/planet-money

    • 18 min
    As The Supreme Court Ends Its Term, The Christian Nationalist Right Keeps Winning

    As The Supreme Court Ends Its Term, The Christian Nationalist Right Keeps Winning

    The Supreme Court ends its term and Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson takes the bench. And how does the Christian right keep securing political wins even as the share of like-minded Americans dwindles?

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, political reporter Ashley Lopez, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.

    Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

    Connect:
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    • 27 min
    Supreme Court Curbs Environmental Protection Agency's Power To Protect Environment

    Supreme Court Curbs Environmental Protection Agency's Power To Protect Environment

    The Supreme Court limited the ways in which the EPA could regulate greenhouse gas pollution from power plants, jeopardizing President Biden's goal for an emissions-free power sector by 2035.

    And the high court sided with the Biden administration in a case concerning the White House's decision to end the so-called "Remain in Mexico" policy. The Trump-era policy had required asylum seekers to either be detained in the U.S. or sent to Mexico where while they wait for months or years to have their asylum claims reviewed. Now, Biden will be allowed to end the policy.

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, climate reporter Laura Benshoff, and immigration reporter Joel Rose.

    Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

    Connect:
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    • 14 min
    NATO Expansion To Move Ahead Despite Russia's War In Ukraine

    NATO Expansion To Move Ahead Despite Russia's War In Ukraine

    The alliance is poised to admit Sweden and Finland after Turkey dropped its objections to their membership. The U.S. will bolster its military presence in Europe as Russia continues its war in Ukraine. And Biden's trip to Europe to meet with other world leaders has included a number of meetings on global inflation and the economy.

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.

    Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

    Connect:
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    Find and support your local public radio station.

    • 13 min
    Trump Tried To Join Attack On Capitol; Our Interview With VP Harris On End Of Roe

    Trump Tried To Join Attack On Capitol; Our Interview With VP Harris On End Of Roe

    According to testimony from White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson, Trump knew that the some protesters were armed before encouraging them to march on the Capitol, didn't want to intervene once they stormed the building, and indicated he agreed with the chants that Vice President Pence should be hanged. Hutchinson said that Rudy Giuliani and Chief of Staff Mark Meadows sought pardons.

    And, in an interview with NPR's Asma Khalid, Vice President Kamala Harris refused to say whether she supports ending the filibuster — a tool that allows senators to force a 60-vote majority to pass legislation and has stymied the administration's goals. She said that right now, there is not enough support among the party's lawmakers to make that change and that voters who are concerned need to elect more Democrats to Congress.

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving, and White House correspondent Ron Elving.

    Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

    Connect:
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    Find and support your local public radio station.

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
412 Ratings

412 Ratings

VJ in UK ,

❤️ Ayesha

We’ll miss you!!

Expat Mike ,

Election Day Exit Polls

I have concern about Election Day exit polling, and mainstream broadcast networks’ traditional role of ‘calling’ election results on election day.

How will these predictions - supposedly based on exit interview results - be made for this election? If we consider that already HALF of the 2020 votes have been cast by remote ballot and in person voting and there are days left to run for more votes to be submitted, then what votes will be left to count from the universe of in-person voting on election day?

How can pollsters interview mail-in ballots or early in person voters to get a statistically significant confidence level to factor in that data and better predict the outcome (rhetorical question - they can’t)?

Any election calls made on the day that are based on in-person exit interviews from targeted polling stations will be skewed and unrepresentative of the larger voting public. Those calls, if made, will formulate the backbone of any claim to the office of the Presidency and weigh HEAVILY on the public’s perception of who ‘won’ the election - well before the count is complete.

We can already see the candidates’ around the nation telegraphing their election day and post election day game plan, and its hinging largely on the widely but erroneously propagated idea that the result ‘must be known on the day’.

I’ve not heard anything about this, and hope that it can be addressed and get into the public psyche so we don’t end up with 2000 repeat from the Florida experience, and show the ability to be patient and wait for the true count of all votes to be completed before jumping to any wrong conclusions.

kat_cary ,

Fell of a Quality Cliff Edge

Why are the candidates that are backed by corporate contributors to NPR get about 2.5x the mentions? Whether it’s an institutional muzzle or lack of journalistic integrity, the result is propaganda.
Facebook is a contributor to NPR.
— A former long-time listener

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