289 episodes

An 'informal and informative' philosophy podcast inspiring and supporting students, teachers, academics and free-thinkers worldwide. All episodes are available at www.thepanpsycast.com.

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast Jack Symes | Andrew Horton, Oliver Marley, and Rose de Castellane

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 302 Ratings

An 'informal and informative' philosophy podcast inspiring and supporting students, teachers, academics and free-thinkers worldwide. All episodes are available at www.thepanpsycast.com.

    Episode 115, ‘Intellectual Seemings’ with Laura Gow (Part I - Everything is Clear)

    Episode 115, ‘Intellectual Seemings’ with Laura Gow (Part I - Everything is Clear)

    Our sensory experiences make up the fabric of our worlds. It’s a fabric that keeps us warm; a fabric that makes the world worth living in. If you couldn’t hear the cry of your new-born child, if you couldn’t taste your grandfather’s famous brussels sprouts at Christmas, or feel the embrace of your lifelong partner, then your life wouldn’t just include less experiences, but less meaning. Given the value we place on our sensory experiences, it seems important that we understand the nature of them. What is happening, exactly, when we hear, taste, and feel? What are sensory experiences made of?
    In this episode, we’ll be exploring the nature of sensory phenomenology with Dr Laura Gow, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Liverpool. Formerly of Warwick University, Cambridge University, and the University of Antwerp, Dr Gow – whose work focuses on the philosophy of perception and the metaphysics of consciousness – is one of the UK’s leading phenomenologists. From hallucinations and colour to empty space and silence, Laura’s research covers a broad range of topics, but in this episode we’ll be focusing on transparency.
    According to the transparency view, when we undergo a perceptual experience, the only properties we’re aware of are located externally. There are no perceptual properties, says Gow, inside of us – despite what it may seem.


    This episode is produced in partnership with the Philosophy and the Future project at the University of Liverpool. For more information about philosophy at Liverpool, head over to www.liverpool.ac.uk/philosophy.




    Contents
    Part I. Everything is Clear
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links
    Laura Gow (website)
    Laura Gow, Colour (paper)
    Laura Gow, Everything is Clear (paper)
    Laura Gow, Empty Space, Silence, and Absence (paper)
    Laura Gow, A New Theory of Absence Experience (paper)
    Laura Gow, Perceptual Experience and Physicalism (paper)
    Laura Gow, The Limitations of Perceptual Transparency (paper)

    • 36 min
    Episode 114, ‘Changing Minds’ with Robin McKenna (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    Episode 114, ‘Changing Minds’ with Robin McKenna (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    ‘630 million threatened by rising seas!’; ‘Study blames climate change for 37% of worldwide heat deaths!’; ‘Fossil fuels must stay underground!’
    Despite the headlines and 97% of climate scientists agreeing that human activity is one of the major causes of climate change, just seven in ten Americans believe that climate change is real and only six in ten consider human activity to be a leading cause. As a survey of beliefs, these statistics are concerning. The bigger problem, however, is that they aren’t held in a vacuum, but are formed within and contribute to the functioning of democratic societies. 
    If we want a genuinely democratic state, how can we establish public policies – informed by our very best science – if a sizable minority of people reject the science? What can be done, descriptively and ethically, to change the minds of those who hold (what experts might consider) unreasonable beliefs?
    According to Robin McKenna, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Liverpool, these questions demonstrate the role and importance of contemporary epistemology. Drawing from the latest empirical research on how we form beliefs and how and why we change our minds, McKenna argues that we can improve our epistemic situations by creating environments in which we are more likely to form beliefs that align with the science.
    To bring about a better world, people must recognise that their beliefs aren’t formed in an ideal and impartial state. To protect democracy and the natural world, says McKenna, we must combat misinformation and political bias through ethical and effective marketing.


    Contents
    Part I. Communicating Science
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links
    Robin McKenna (website).
    Robin McKenna, Persuasion and Intellectual Autonomy (chapter).
    Robin McKenna, Persuasion and Epistemic Paternalism (paper).


    This episode is produced in partnership with the Philosophy and the Future project at the University of Liverpool. For more information about philosophy at Liverpool, head over to www.liverpool.ac.uk/philosophy.

    • 37 min
    Episode 114, ‘Changing Minds’ with Robin McKenna (Part I - Communicating Science)

    Episode 114, ‘Changing Minds’ with Robin McKenna (Part I - Communicating Science)

    ‘630 million threatened by rising seas!’; ‘Study blames climate change for 37% of worldwide heat deaths!’; ‘Fossil fuels must stay underground!’
    Despite the headlines and 97% of climate scientists agreeing that human activity is one of the major causes of climate change, just seven in ten Americans believe that climate change is real and only six in ten consider human activity to be a leading cause. As a survey of beliefs, these statistics are concerning. The bigger problem, however, is that they aren’t held in a vacuum, but are formed within and contribute to the functioning of democratic societies. 
    If we want a genuinely democratic state, how can we establish public policies – informed by our very best science – if a sizable minority of people reject the science? What can be done, descriptively and ethically, to change the minds of those who hold (what experts might consider) unreasonable beliefs?
    According to Robin McKenna, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Liverpool, these questions demonstrate the role and importance of contemporary epistemology. Drawing from the latest empirical research on how we form beliefs and how and why we change our minds, McKenna argues that we can improve our epistemic situations by creating environments in which we are more likely to form beliefs that align with the science.
    To bring about a better world, people must recognise that their beliefs aren’t formed in an ideal and impartial state. To protect democracy and the natural world, says McKenna, we must combat misinformation and political bias through ethical and effective marketing.


    Contents
    Part I. Communicating Science
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links
    Robin McKenna (website).
    Robin McKenna, Persuasion and Intellectual Autonomy (chapter).
    Robin McKenna, Persuasion and Epistemic Paternalism (paper).


    This episode is produced in partnership with the Philosophy and the Future project at the University of Liverpool. For more information about philosophy at Liverpool, head over to www.liverpool.ac.uk/philosophy.

    • 49 min
    Episode 113, Epicurus and the Art of Happiness (Part III - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    Episode 113, Epicurus and the Art of Happiness (Part III - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    You’re going to a party, but you don’t care if the other guests will like your dress. You pull onto your drive; you don’t consider what your neighbours will think of your car. You sell books that you’ve written, share photographs that you’ve taken, and post your thoughts on the world to any internet user who will listen – yet, you are unmoved and unmotivated by the popularity of your work.
    Imagine if you didn’t have to worry about your career, your fame, or wealth. Imagine if you didn’t have to fret about falling in love or maintaining that love once you’ve found it. Imagine never feeling daunted by the fact you’re going to die, and that something may or may not be waiting for you beyond the grave. If you could free yourself from these anxieties, do you think you would be happy? Well, isn’t happiness the goal of life, after all?
    According to the Epicureans, we should answer these questions with a resounding ‘yes’. For his followers, Epicurus worked out exactly how we can achieve this state of happiness and tranquillity, and the good news is that it is within reach for all of us. All we need to do is follow one principle: pursue pleasure and avoid pain. It’s just that simple.







    This episode is proudly sponsored by Gaston Luga backpacks.  
    Head over to www.gastonluga.com and get 15% off any purchase with the discount code PANPSYCAST.



    Contents
    Part I. The Path to Tranquility
    Part II. Metaphysics, God, and Death
    Part III. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links
    Haris Dimitriadis, Epicurus And The Pleasant Life: A Philosophy of Nature
    Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus: Meditations from a Greek Island on the Pleasures of Old Age
    Epicurus and John Strodach, The Art of Happiness
    John Sellars, The Fourfold Remedy: Epicurus and the Art of Happiness
    James Warren, The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism
    Catherine Wilson, Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction
    Catherine Wilson, The Pleasure Principle: Epicureanism: A Philosophy for Modern Living

    • 52 min
    Episode 113, Epicurus and the Art of Happiness (Part II - Metaphysics, God, and Death)

    Episode 113, Epicurus and the Art of Happiness (Part II - Metaphysics, God, and Death)

    You’re going to a party, but you don’t care if the other guests will like your dress. You pull onto your drive; you don’t consider what your neighbours will think of your car. You sell books that you’ve written, share photographs that you’ve taken, and post your thoughts on the world to any internet user who will listen – yet, you are unmoved and unmotivated by the popularity of your work.
    Imagine if you didn’t have to worry about your career, your fame, or wealth. Imagine if you didn’t have to fret about falling in love or maintaining that love once you’ve found it. Imagine never feeling daunted by the fact you’re going to die, and that something may or may not be waiting for you beyond the grave. If you could free yourself from these anxieties, do you think you would be happy? Well, isn’t happiness the goal of life, after all?
    According to the Epicureans, we should answer these questions with a resounding ‘yes’. For his followers, Epicurus worked out exactly how we can achieve this state of happiness and tranquillity, and the good news is that it is within reach for all of us. All we need to do is follow one principle: pursue pleasure and avoid pain. It’s just that simple.







    This episode is proudly sponsored by Gaston Luga backpacks. Head over to www.gastonluga.com and get 15% off any purchase with the discount code PANPSYCAST.



    Contents
    Part I. The Path to Tranquility
    Part II. Metaphysics, God, and Death
    Part III. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links
    Haris Dimitriadis, Epicurus And The Pleasant Life: A Philosophy of Nature
    Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus: Meditations from a Greek Island on the Pleasures of Old Age
    Epicurus and John Strodach, The Art of Happiness
    John Sellars, The Fourfold Remedy: Epicurus and the Art of Happiness
    James Warren, The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism
    Catherine Wilson, Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction
    Catherine Wilson, The Pleasure Principle: Epicureanism: A Philosophy for Modern Living

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Episode 113, Epicurus and the Art of Happiness (Part I - The Path to Tranquility)

    Episode 113, Epicurus and the Art of Happiness (Part I - The Path to Tranquility)

    You’re going to a party, but you don’t care if the other guests will like your dress. You pull onto your drive; you don’t consider what your neighbours will think of your car. You sell books that you’ve written, share photographs that you’ve taken, and post your thoughts on the world to any internet user who will listen – yet, you are unmoved and unmotivated by the popularity of your work.
    Imagine if you didn’t have to worry about your career, your fame, or wealth. Imagine if you didn’t have to fret about falling in love or maintaining that love once you’ve found it. Imagine never feeling daunted by the fact you’re going to die, and that something may or may not be waiting for you beyond the grave. If you could free yourself from these anxieties, do you think you would be happy? Well, isn’t happiness the goal of life, after all?
    According to the Epicureans, we should answer these questions with a resounding ‘yes’. For his followers, Epicurus worked out exactly how we can achieve this state of happiness and tranquillity, and the good news is that it is within reach for all of us. All we need to do is follow one principle: pursue pleasure and avoid pain. It’s just that simple.







    This episode is proudly sponsored by Gaston Luga backpacks.  
    Head over to www.gastonluga.com and get 15% off any purchase with the discount code PANPSYCAST.



    Contents
    Part I. The Path to Tranquility
    Part II. Metaphysics, God, and Death
    Part III. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links
    Haris Dimitriadis, Epicurus And The Pleasant Life: A Philosophy of Nature
    Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus: Meditations from a Greek Island on the Pleasures of Old Age
    Epicurus and John Strodach, The Art of Happiness
    John Sellars, The Fourfold Remedy: Epicurus and the Art of Happiness
    James Warren, The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism
    Catherine Wilson, Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction
    Catherine Wilson, The Pleasure Principle: Epicureanism: A Philosophy for Modern Living

    • 1 hr 10 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
302 Ratings

302 Ratings

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