36 episodes

Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. In each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.

The Play Podcast Douglas Schatz

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 6 Ratings

Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. In each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.

    The Recruiting Officer by George Farquhar

    The Recruiting Officer by George Farquhar

    Episode 034: The Recruiting Officer by George Farquhar
    Host: Douglas Schatz
    Guest: Matt Beresford
    Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. Each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We’ll discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.
    George Farquhar’s rollicking Restoration Comedy The Recruiting Officer is ostensibly a portrait of officers engaged in the nefarious art of impressing men into the army in the country town of Shrewsbury, but it is as much a tale of the local ladies themselves recruiting for lovers and husbands. The classic comic satire of love and war, and sex and deception was first performed at Drury Lane in 1706, and went on to become one of the most frequently performed plays of the 18th century and a staple of education curricula and theatre programming ever since.

    Director Matt Beresford joins us to assess the ‘recruiting officers’' respective strategies and successes.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Leopoldstadt by Tom Stoppard

    Leopoldstadt by Tom Stoppard

    Episode 033: Leopoldstadt by Tom Stoppard
    Host: Douglas Schatz
    Guest: Patrick Marber
    Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. Each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We’ll discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.
    Tom Stoppard’s ambitious new play Leopoldstadt is a sweeping work of history and ideas which charts the diaspora and decline of an Austrian Jewish family through the convulsive events of the first half of the twentieth century. It addresses profound moral questions of identity, memory and prejudice that are insistently relevant in our time. It is not only a towering intellectual achievement, it is also very personally poignant because it is based partly on Stoppard’s own remarkable family history.
    Leopoldstadt opened in the West End in January 2020, only to be closed prematurely by the pandemic a few weeks later. Happily it has returned to the London stage this Autumn, and I am privileged and delighted to talk in this episode with the director of the London productions, playwright Patrick Marber.

    • 56 min
    Footnotes Volume 3

    Footnotes Volume 3

    Episode 032: Footnotes Volume 3
    Host: Douglas Schatz
    Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. Each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We’ll discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.
    Footnotes Volume 3 is a recording of the facts and observations that we’ve published on the website to supplement the plays that we’ve covered in episodes 24-31. A smorgasbord of trivia and analysis ranging from Greek Tragedy to the stock characters of Commedia dell’Arte , through the music of Bob Dylan, the filming of Caryl Churchill’s Escaped Alone during lockdown, and the theatrical installations of Samuel Beckett.
    A compendium of dramatic intelligence!
    Plays referred to in this episode include:
    Consent by Nina Raine Medea by Euripides A Servant to Two Masters by Goldoni, and One Man Two Guvnors by Richard Bean Present Laughter by Noel Coward Girl from the North Country by Conor McPherson and Bob Dylan A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney Escaped Alone by Caryl Churchill Happy Days by Samuel Beckett  

    • 45 min
    Happy Days by Samuel Beckett

    Happy Days by Samuel Beckett

    Episode 031: Happy Days by Samuel Beckett
    Host: Douglas Schatz
    Guest: Lisa Dwan
    Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. Each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We’ll discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.
    Samuel Beckett’s third great dramatic masterpiece Happy Days is a timeless exploration of existential threat and personal survival. It’s central image of Winnie buried in a mound of scorched earth also speaks to our own time when many have endured enforced confinement in a world struck by collective disaster.
    Irish actress and Beckett scholar Lisa Dwan, fresh from her triumphant performance as Winnie at the Riverside Studios in London, joins us to share her unique experience of playing Beckett and this majestic play.

    • 50 min
    Escaped Alone by Caryl Churchill

    Escaped Alone by Caryl Churchill

    Episode 030: Escaped Alone by Caryl Churchill
    Host: Douglas Schatz
    Guest: Elaine Aston
    Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. Each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We’ll discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.
    Caryl Churchill’s stunning play Escaped Alone presents an ordinary scene of four women of a certain age chatting over tea in a suburban garden. Of course not all is as tranquil as it appears, for each of the women harbour dark personal anxieties, and from time to time one of them steps away from the garden to share news with us about apocalyptic disasters that have struck the world. Produced at the Royal Court in 2016, Churchill’s vision of a world overcome by collective disaster has proved to be extraordinarily prophetic. Joining me to explore our first Churchill play is Professor Elaine Aston, author of a monograph on Caryl Churchill as well as the editor of the Cambridge Companion to Caryl Churchill.

    • 59 min
    A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney

    A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney

    Episode 029: A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney
    Host: Douglas Schatz
    Guest: Nadine Holdsworth
    Welcome to The Play Podcast where we explore the greatest new and classic plays. Each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We’ll discuss the play’s origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing.
    Shelagh Delaney’s A Taste of Honey caused a sensation when it appeared at the Theatre Royal Stratford in 1958 because of its frank portrayal of a working-class, single mother and daughter, as well as its bold representations of a mixed-race relationship and a young homosexual as a central character. Delaney sent her first play to the renowned director Joan Littlewood who helped develop it into an historic production which went on to the West End and Broadway. Professor Nadine Holdsworth helps us to explore the enduring power and relevance of the play.

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

aliz265 ,

Excellent Podcast

An intelligent and absorbing hour.

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