45 episodes

Inquiry. Travesty. Not like other podcasts.
@stanleypicnic: @georgelazenby, @juskewitch, @erikk38

The Relentless Picnic Stanley Picnic

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 15 Ratings

Inquiry. Travesty. Not like other podcasts.
@stanleypicnic: @georgelazenby, @juskewitch, @erikk38

    Cabin - Ep. 7

    Cabin - Ep. 7

    “‘Oh!’ say the technophiles, ‘Science is going to fix all that! We will conquer famine, eliminate psychological suffering, make everybody healthy and happy!’ Yeah, sure. The technophiles are hopelessly naive (or self-deceiving) in their understanding of social problems. Thus it will take a long and difficult period of trial and error for the technophiles to work the bugs out of their Brave New World (if they ever do). In the mean time there will be great suffering.”
    —T. Kaczynski, Industrial Society and Its Future (1995).

    Cabin is the new season from The Relentless Picnic. It's one story told over multiple episodes. It's a story about solitude and isolation, community and loss, Henry David Thoreau and Ted Kaczynski—and it's told through audio recorded throughout 2019 and 2020.

    New episodes biweekly—or close to biweekly.

    Support us at patreon.com/relentlesspicnic for access to a ton of bonus content.

    Our web site is relentlesspicnic.com

    SOURCES (Ep. 7):
    - The Unabomber In His Own Words (2018), dir. Mick Grogan, on Netflix: bit.ly/2DbHkuh ;
    - Technological Slavery: The Collected Writings of Theodore J. Kaczynski, a.k.a. “The Unabomber”, ed. and introduction by David Skirbina, 2010: amzn.to/2STTFYH ;
    - Walden; or, Life in the Woods, by H.D. Thoreau (1854): bit.ly/35RyPPQ ;
    - Patrick Conley: bit.ly/3pGdIIL ;
    - Ken Baumann: bit.ly/2WUmHK1 ;
    - Jacques Ellul, The Technological Society (1954): amzn.to/3o2zdmy ;
    - Eric Hoffer, The True Believer (1951): amzn.to/34TDrFl ;
    - The History of Violence in America, eds. H.D. Graham & T.R. Gurr (1969): amzn.to/3rCmGsl ;
    - Chester C. Tan, Chinese Political Thought in the Twentieth Century (1971): amzn.to/3aUNCgQ ;
    - L. Sprague de Camp, The Ancient Engineers (1963): amzn.to/3o8lavW ;
    - “Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us,” by Bill Joy (WIRED, Apr., 2000): bit.ly/3hw5uQD ;
    - season photo: "Untitled #2214" by Todd Hido, 1998.

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Cabin - Ep. 6

    Cabin - Ep. 6

    “It may be objected that primitive man is physically less secure than modern man, as is shown by his shorter life expectancy; hence modern man suffers from less, not more than the amount of insecurity that is normal for human beings. But psychological security does not closely correspond with physical security. It is true that primitive man is powerless against some of the things that threaten him; disease for example. But he can accept the risk of disease stoically. It is part of the nature of things, it is no one’s fault, unless it is the fault of some imaginary, impersonal demon. But threats to the modern individual tend to be MAN-MADE.”
    —T. Kaczynski, Industrial Society and Its Future (1995).

    Cabin is the new season from The Relentless Picnic. It's one story told over multiple episodes. It's a story about solitude and isolation, community and loss, Henry David Thoreau and Ted Kaczynski—and it's told through audio recorded throughout 2019 and 2020.

    New episodes weekly—or close to weekly.

    Support us at patreon.com/relentlesspicnic for access to a ton of bonus content.

    Our web site is relentlesspicnic.com

    SOURCES (Ep. 6):

    - The Unabomber In His Own Words (2018), dir. Mick Grogan, on Netflix: bit.ly/2DbHkuh ;
    - Technological Slavery: The Collected Writings of Theodore J. Kaczynski, a.k.a. “The Unabomber”, ed. and introduction by David Skirbina, 2010: amzn.to/2STTFYH ;
    - Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men (a.k.a. the “Second Discourse”), Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1755 ;
    - Walden; or, Life in the Woods, by H.D. Thoreau (1854): bit.ly/35RyPPQ ;
    - “Walking,” by H.D. Thoreau (1862): bit.ly/35P4Dor ;
    - season photo: "Untitled #2214" by Todd Hido, 1998.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Cabin - Ep. 5

    Cabin - Ep. 5

    “The Industrial Revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race. The continued development of technology will worsen the situation. There is no way of reforming or modifying the system so as to prevent it from depriving people of dignity and autonomy. If the system breaks down the consequences will still be very painful. But the bigger the system grows the more disastrous the results of its breakdown will be, so if it is to break down it had best break down sooner rather than later. We therefore advocate a revolution against the industrial system. This revolution may or may not make use of violence; it may be sudden or it may be a relatively gradual process spanning a few decades. This is not to be a POLITICAL revolution. Its object will be to overthrow not governments but the economic and technological basis of the present society.” —T. Kaczynski, Industrial Society and Its Future, 1995.

    Cabin is the new season from The Relentless Picnic. It's one story told over multiple episodes. It's a story about solitude and isolation, community and loss, Henry David Thoreau and Ted Kaczynski—and it's told through audio recorded throughout 2019 and 2020.

    New episodes weekly—or close to weekly.

    Support us at patreon.com/relentlesspicnic for access to a ton of bonus content.

    Our web site is relentlesspicnic.com .

    SOURCES (Ep. 5):
    - The Unabomber In His Own Words (2018), dir. Mick Grogan, on Netflix: bit.ly/2DbHkuh ;
    - Technological Slavery: The Collected Writings of Theodore J. Kaczysnki, a.k.a. “The Unabomber”, ed. and introduction by David Skirbina, 2010: amzn.to/2STTFYH ;
    - Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men (a.k.a. the “Second Discourse”), Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1755 ;
    - season photo: "Untitled #2214" by Todd Hido, 1998.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Cabin - Ep. 4

    Cabin - Ep. 4

    “One writer says that Brown's peculiar monomania made him to be ‘dreaded by the Missourians as a supernatural being.’ Sure enough, a hero in the midst of us cowards is always so dreaded. He is just that thing. He shows himself superior to nature. He has a spark of divinity in him. They talk as if it were impossible that a man could be ‘divinely appointed’ in these days to do any work whatever; as if vows and religion were out of date as connected with any man's daily work; as if the agent to abolish slavery could only be somebody appointed by the President, or by some political party. They talk as if a man's death were a failure, and his continued life, be it of whatever character, were a success.”
    —H.D. Thoreau, “A Plea For Captain John Brown,” 1859.

    Cabin is the new season from The Relentless Picnic. It's one story told over multiple episodes. It's a story about solitude and isolation, community and loss, Henry David Thoreau and Ted Kaczynski—and it's told through audio recorded throughout 2019 and 2020.

    New episodes weekly—or close to weekly.

    Support us at patreon.com/relentlesspicnic for access to a ton of bonus content.

    Our web site is relentlesspicnic.com

    SOURCES (Ep. 4):
    - “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” by H.D. Thoreau (1859): bit.ly/2CPiMHT ;
    - Walden; or, Life in the Woods, by H.D. Thoreau (1854): bit.ly/3jS0Woq ;
    - Videos and resources on John Brown, the raid on Harpers Ferry, and its aftermath: youtu.be/EG4ukrMtdNs , youtu.be/bB_kbFAui-U , youtu.be/LPyqE2zpQCg , youtu.be/Ax7KjLUOt8w , youtu.be/roNmeOOJCDY , youtu.be/q-E-ffXl2Uk , youtu.be/MILN_17KH6M , youtu.be/dmyswQs6_Bw .
    - Henry David Thoreau: A Life, by Laura Dassow Walls (2018): amzn.to/2B22qdw ;
    - “Civil Disobedience,” by H.D. Thoreau (1849): bit.ly/2OYTQjz ;
    - Westward, I Go Free: Tracing Thoreau’s Last Journey, by Corinne Smith: amzn.to/2OUyYKi ; corinnehsmith.com ; thoreausociety.org ;
    - Thoreau’s letter to Parker Pillsbury, April 10 1861: bit.ly/2WVVdEg [“Blessed are they who never read a newspaper, for they shall see Nature, and through her, God. But alas I have heard of Sumpter, & Pickens, & even of Buchanan, (though I did not read his message)”] ;
    - Thoreau’s journals, 1860-61: bit.ly/2WXHUmI ;
    - “The Wreckage,” The Relentless Picnic, ep. 27: bit.ly/2By6Md7 ;
    - Joanna Newsom, “Does Not Suffice” (youtu.be/FkjkT-ohCpQ) & “Good Intentions Paving Company” (youtu.be/KCCl3nzL5PI) ;
    - Don DeLillo, Mao II (1991): amzn.to/30VqmJc ;
    - The Unabomber In His Own Words (2018), documentary on Netflix: bit.ly/2DbHkuh ;
    - season photo: "Untitled #2214" by Todd Hido, 1998.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Cabin - Ep. 3

    Cabin - Ep. 3

    “Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the factitious cares and superfluously coarse labors of life that its finer fruits cannot be plucked by them. . . . Some, not wise, go to the other side of the globe, to barbarous and unhealthy regions, devote themselves to trade for ten or twenty years, in order that they may live—that is, keep comfortably warm—and die in New England at last.” —H.D. Thoreau, Walden, “Economy,” 1854.

    Cabin is the new season from The Relentless Picnic. It's one story told over multiple episodes. It's a story about solitude and isolation, community and loss, Henry David Thoreau and Ted Kaczynski—and it's told through audio recorded throughout 2019 and 2020.

    New episodes weekly.

    Support us at patreon.com/relentlesspicnic for access to a ton of bonus content.

    Our web site is relentlesspicnic.com

    SOURCES (Ep. 3):
    - Walden; or, Life in the Woods, by H.D. Thoreau (1854) ;
    - The journals of Henry David Thoreau (1837-1861): bit.ly/36Lxavm ;
    - “Ktaadn,” by H.D. Thoreau (1848): bit.ly/2CSXvga ;
    - The Maine Woods, by H.D. Thoreau (posthumously, 1862): bit.ly/3icJ5HO ;
    - “Early Retirement Extreme” by J.L. Fisker (2010): amzn.to/2ZpEZn2 ;
    - Ben Gaddes: appalachianben.tumblr.com, bengaddes.com, & bit.ly/2ZA4CBZ ;
    - Henry David Thoreau: A Life, by Laura Dassow Walls (2018): amzn.to/2B22qdw ;

    FURTHER READING:
    - An excerpt from "On Trails" by Robert Moor (2016), on Thoreau and Katahdin: bit.ly/3gbBibC ;
    - “What Happened to the Thoreau Spring Plaque [on Katahdin]?” by Howard R. Whitcomb (2015): bit.ly/31u79jq .

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Cabin - Ep. 2

    Cabin - Ep. 2

    “I perceive that we partially die ourselves through sympathy at the death of each of our friends or near relatives. Each such experience is an assault on our vital force. It becomes a source of wonder that they who have lost many friends still live. After long watching around the sickbed of a friend, we, too, partially give up the ghost with him, and are the less to be identified with this state of things.” —H.D. Thoreau, Journal, 1859.

    Cabin is the new season from The Relentless Picnic. It's one story told over multiple episodes. It's a story about solitude and isolation, community and loss, Henry David Thoreau and Ted Kaczynski—and it's told through audio recorded throughout 2019 and 2020.

    New episodes weekly.

    Support us at patreon.com/relentlesspicnic for access to a ton of bonus content.

    Our web site is relentlesspicnic.com

    SOURCES (Ep. 2):

    - Walden; or, Life in the Woods, by H.D. Thoreau (1854) ;
    - The journals of Henry David Thoreau (1837-1861): bit.ly/36Lxavm ;
    - Henry David Thoreau: A Life, by Laura Dassow Walls (2018): amzn.to/2B22qdw ;
    - Letter from N. Hawthorne to H.W. Longfellow (Nov. 21, 1848): bit.ly/3fjSqeP ;
    - With Walt Whitman in Camden, vol. 1, by Horace Traubel (1906): bit.ly/2YpXhEq ;
    - “Pierre Menard, Author of the ‘Quixote’” by Jorge Luis Borges (tr. 1962): bit.ly/2UACA7H ;
    - season photo: "Untitled #2214" by Todd Hido, 1998.

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

maaaaaaaaaaark ,

Wildly unfocused in the best possible way

You know all those Medium artles with titles that begin with 'Why' or 'How', and then they speak to the question in a very direct way that somehow tells you nothing? This is sort of the opposite of that -- looking at the thing from a million different angles, never quite answering a question directly but somehow always moving towards a clearer or fuller understanding of it.

Also there was a story about a guy who didn't realise men were supposed to use toilet seats.

mrgloss ,

a valued piece

The following is a well-known story, verifiable from a variety of media outlets, but which is worth repeating here for the benefit of those whose only source of news is the iTunes catalogue:

Earlier this year, a metal ammunition case containing a large reel-to-reel tape was discovered in the locked back bedroom of an abandoned house, somewhere in upstate New York.

At first it was thought that it would never be heard. The material was fragile; it was recorded on an obscure variety of quarter-inch tape, discontinued in the early 1980s, and after years of exposure to the cold, damp environs, the tape had fused to the spindle in one solid mass.

Fortunately, the tape fell into the hands of Chuckles 'Charlie' Picnic, a retired sound engineer who, after baking the tape in a warm oven to loosen the chemical bonds, was able to piece together the original recordings. This, I'm told, is the result.

Three men sit in conversation. One of them has a high voice; one has a middle-pitched voice; one has a low voice. We know nothing more about them than this. Each is assigned a role in this peculiar ritual, and each fulfils it precisely.

The high-voiced man is prone to bursts of manic laughter and wild enthusiasm. The middle-voiced man has a certain cold-eyed cogency. The low-voiced man tends towards melancholy. He dreams of a landscape speckled by crematoria.

Considering their age, the quality of these recordings is remarkable. However, it's immediately apparent that Charlie was unable to repair the effects of 'bleed through', where magnetic data from an earlier section of the tape has merged over time with later sections in which it was in direct contact to form a kind of audio palimpsest of voices, sounds, noises, music. Whatever meaning one could ascribe to these juxtapositions is essentially accidental.

The recording is most notable for being one of the few remaining pieces of documented second-hand evidence for the film 'Citizen Kane'. In certain quarters of the internet, rabid Wellesians persist in their belief of the existence of this film. All three men behave exactly as though they had seen it: it is, perhaps, the keystone of the delusion in which they all inhabit.

The location of the house has never been disclosed.

Cob Liken ,

Onion Crunch

Nice to hear a podcast mention my favourite condiment, Onion Crunch.

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