23 episodes

Starting in Florence in the 14th century, a new era began to emerge in the West. People like Petrarch, who re-discovered Cicero’s lost letters, and the new humanists - who valued the study of classical antiquity - ushered in a rebirth, or as we know it today, a “renaissance" - in the study of the arts, the sciences, philosophy, and the theatre. They rediscovered what it meant to be human.

The Renaissance Times Cameron Reilly & Ray Harris

    • History
    • 5.0, 10 Ratings

Starting in Florence in the 14th century, a new era began to emerge in the West. People like Petrarch, who re-discovered Cicero’s lost letters, and the new humanists - who valued the study of classical antiquity - ushered in a rebirth, or as we know it today, a “renaissance" - in the study of the arts, the sciences, philosophy, and the theatre. They rediscovered what it meant to be human.

    #89 – Sandro Botticelli

    #89 – Sandro Botticelli

    During Lorenzo de Medici’s life, no fewer than three of the outstanding artists of the Renaissance are thought to have spent at least a brief formative period of their early lives in the Palazzo Medici: Leonardo and Michelangelo and the one we’re going to talk about for the next few episodes – the great Sandro Botticelli.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    #87 – The Alhambra Decree

    #87 – The Alhambra Decree

    This episode starts with a correction about the skin colour of the Moors, brought to you by our Moroccan listener Mohamed.







    Then, to set the scene for this episode, we have a special song – “The Alhambra Decree” by legendary contemporary folk singer-songwriter David Rovics. Crazy coincidence – I’ve been a fan of David’s work for 15 years and have been on his mailing list forever. And the same week I happened to be preparing this episode, I saw his latest email that contained this song. So I reached out and he was nice enough to give me permission to use this track.







    So what was the Alhambra Decree? It was the 1492 decision, by Isabella and Ferdinand, after they concluded their war with the last remaining Muslim region of Granada, that all of the Jews were to be banished from Spain. But did they really want to banish them? Or just give them an added incentive to convert to Christianity? And why would anyone want to convert to Christianity after the hell the Inquisition had just put the conversos through?







    Some gave in under pressure and converted – some stuck to their guns and migrated to Portugal, whose King promised them refuge. Which was great – until the King of Portugal decided he wanted to marry the daughter of Isabella and Ferdinand.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    #82 – The Cathars

    #82 – The Cathars

    In 1184, Pope Lucius III issued a papal bull, Ad Abolendam, to combat the Albigensian heresy in southern France. They were known as Cathars, or Good Christians. They were going around doing horrible anti-Christian things - like saying killing was bad,

    • 1 hr 11 min
    #79 – The Papal War

    #79 – The Papal War

    In the aftermath of the Pazzi Conspiracy, Florence found itself excommunicated en masse by Pope Sixtus IV unless they handed over Lorenzo De Medici. When the city refused, Pope Sixtus went to war.



     

    • 59 min
    #76 – Larry The Med

    #76 – Larry The Med

    The post #76 – Larry The Med appeared first on The Renaissance Times.

    • 59 min
    #73 – Piero de Medici

    #73 – Piero de Medici

    In 1464, with the death of Cosimo, his only surviving son, Piero di Cosimo de’ Medici – or Piero the Gouty, ‘il Gottoso’, as he came to be called – took over. He was 48 years old. He would survive - and rule - Florence for just five years.

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

saltiresfan ,

Disturbing yet compelling

Like condottieri on retainer Cam and Ray certainly know how to string things out. I was after a really good podcast on the Renaissance and it looks like by 2025 I might have one.

Obviously I started at episode 22 but I’ve been impressed enough that I might go back and listen to the earlier ones. As someone who has studied classical history I look forward to giving the other podcasts a go too.

My only criticism is the constant ahistorical conflation of English and British. I doubt the English have even noticed but it really hacks off the Scots.

Thank you Cam and Ray for brightening up my commute and giving me something new to listen to. 5*s from me.

MotoPod Martin ,

Fascinating, brilliantly insightful, irreverent, objective infotainment

Having been a longtime listener to Cam and Rays’ previous series’, I have to admit that learning the Renaissance show would begin with Constantine the Great, I heaved a sigh and declined to sign up. What a fool!
This is possibly the best thing that Cam and Ray have done; the point is that we can’t understand what the Renaissance (rebirth in Old French) was a rebirth of, or from, or a reaction to without understanding the degree to which Christianity had stifled scientific (and any other) progress or even the process of intellectual questioning. And apart from this making the podcast start a thousand years before the Renaissance itself, it’s a fascinating insight into the early stages of Christianity becoming official state religions. The crude jokes and nicknames are still there but they compliment the delivery rather than disrupt it (just wait for Crispinus.... or maybe you can work it out) and who doesn’t like a blast of Toto’s Africa (most episodes feature the tune somewhere).
So listen to the first few free episodes and make your own mind up but trust me; it only gets better.

El Groo ,

Taking a long view

My long-held theory that Roman history is a bit dull after Marcus Aurelius is blown away by this entertaining podcast covering the role of Christianity in the decline of the empire and the loss of its culture and knowledge in the West.

Presumably working on the premise that you can never have enough context, veteran podcasters Ray and Cam have started their Renaissance podcast 1,000 years early. Which is cool. I’m patient. They have form: less than 40% of their legendary ‘Life of Alexander’ podcast was about the life of Alexander.

Ray and Cam are entertaining story tellers, and Ray even seems to be reading ahead these days. They make the context essential. It’s good to know what the Renaissancers renaissanced back to. There’s more to the story than a bunch of Italians reading old books.

So if you want a fun look at the Christotokos v Theotokos debate, or simply love some Christian on Christian action, then this is the podcast to you.

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