100 episodes

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive is a podcast that contains off-air recordings from the shortwaves. These recordings represent the wide variety of stations found on the shortwave, long wave and medium wave radio spectrums (30-30,000 kHz)

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

    • Technology
    • 4.2 • 5 Ratings

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive is a podcast that contains off-air recordings from the shortwaves. These recordings represent the wide variety of stations found on the shortwave, long wave and medium wave radio spectrums (30-30,000 kHz)

    Kol Israel: September 12, 2001

    Kol Israel: September 12, 2001

    Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Dave Zantow, for sharing the following recording and notes:
    Kol Israel (15:01)
    September 12, 2001 at 0400 UTC
    15640 kHz
    Receiver used was a Japan Radio Co. NRD-545 (Sync on and 10 kHz bandwidth). One can hear minor DSP artifacts (burps) mixed in the background. Of course a common trait for the NRD-545.

    BBC World Service: September 12, 2001

    BBC World Service: September 12, 2001

    Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Dave Zantow, who shares the following recording and notes:
    BBC World Service (16:49)
    September 12, 2001 at 0000 UTC on 5975 kHz
    Receiver used was a Japan Radio Co. NRD-545 (Sync on and 10 kHz bandwidth). One can hear minor DSP artifacts (burps) mixed in the background. Of course a common trait for the NRD-545.

    HF Aviation Traffic (Spirit Airlines 558): May 11, 2021

    HF Aviation Traffic (Spirit Airlines 558): May 11, 2021

    Image by Moritz Mentges














    Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Matt Todd, who shares this bit of HF aviation traffic he recently recorded. Matt notes
    Air to ground communications between Spirit 558 and New York. A phone patch was established to allow the aircraft to talk to a doctor on the ground about a person who had a seizure while on board the flight.
    Date of recording: 5/11/2021
    Starting time: 0256 UTC
    Frequency: 8.933
    Reciever location: Hugo, MN
    Receiver and antenna: Sdr Play with a wire loop antenna around the perimeter of the attic
    Mode: Single Side Band

    Radio Echo One (Italian Pirate Radio): March 15, 2021

    Radio Echo One (Italian Pirate Radio): March 15, 2021

    Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Rosa Sanese, who shares the following recording and notes:
    About a month and a half after the previous radio listening recording that I published, here is a new audio file that I got listening to "Yoga Network" (the one that many years ago in Bologna broadcast in medium waves on AM 1503 kHz—?), re-transmitted by "Radio Echo One" in the afternoon of May 15, 2021 on 1710 kHz. I received the station with my Tecsun PL-600 receiver.

    UNID Russian Numbers Station: April 26, 2021

    UNID Russian Numbers Station: April 26, 2021

    Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Walker, who shares the following recording of a Russian language numbers station. Paul recorded this on April 26, 2021 at 0218 UTC in McGrath, Alaska, on 11,615 kHz.
    Feel free to comment if you can ID this particular station.

    Voyager 1 (90 Deg Bank Angle): Dec 20, 1986

    Voyager 1 (90 Deg Bank Angle): Dec 20, 1986

    Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bruce Frederick who shares the following recording and notes:
    VOYAGER 1 90 Deg Bank Angle 8.822 MHz 20 Dec 1986 2200 UTC
    Recently when cleaning out our attic I came across QSLs that I received from the Voyager crew from their historic1986 circumnavigation of the earth. After continued searching I also came across the cassette recordings I made of some of their communications between Dec 20 - 22, 1986. The first hour provides the most compelling listening, as I started the tape just before Voyage unexpectedly ran into severe weather issues off the coast of Brazil. The small aircraft was tossed to a bank angle of 90 degrees, which theoretically it shouldn't have recovered from, yet Rutan was just barely able to maintain control and keep flying. At the worst possible time, the Vandenburg transmitter went down leaving Rutan and Yeager out of communication with their weather team who they were depending on to give them a safe heading to fly out of the storms. The stress and tension of the situation are very evident in the voices. I have several hours of additional comms, but this excerpt is the most compelling. While preparing this submission, I discovered that Tom Gavaras from MN made a similar contribution on July 28, 2020, covering a period a couple of days after this event. These contributions are complementary and should probably be cross-linked for people interested in hearing different days of the mission. Note that like Tom, I also have the QSLs I received a few months after the mission.
    BROADCASTER:
    Voyager Mission Control at Vandenburg AFB and Voyage aircraft in-flight near Brazil
    DATE OF RECORDING:
    12/20/1986
    STARTING TIME:
    ~2200 UTC
    FREQUENCY:
    8.822 MHz
    RX LOCATION:
    Boston, MA USA
    RECEIVER AND ANTENNA:
    Icom 745 with horizontal wire dipole at ~30 ft.
    MODE:
    Single Side Band
    Additional details:
    Regarding the QSL card, Bruce notes:
    "...I was never a big QSL collector when I was active in the '80s but this was kind of special: QSLs for the Voyager 1 non-stop flight around the world in 1986, signed by Dick Rutan, Jeana Yeager, and Larry Gaskey (Mission Operations Director). Since this this wasn't a commercial broadcast organization, I didn't think they would have QSL cards (or even know what a QSL request was), so I followed the protocol of the time and prepared my own 8.5" x 11" printout and polite cover letter explaining why I was writing. I was blown away when I received not only detailed info on my home brew form, but a classy postcard signed personally by Rutan and Yeager..."













































    The Voyage flight plan from this website:

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Sonixant ,

Fascinating

For the lovers of shortwave and vintage radios this Podcast is a perfect soundtrack. I love the cracklings and sounds and the test transmissions bring me back memories of me playing with grandpa’s radio.
Highly suggested for ham radio fanatics and lovers of the Conet Project and Numbers Stations.

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