26 episodes

Irish writers read and discuss a favourite story from the archives of the Stinging Fly magazine.

The Stinging Fly Podcast The Stinging Fly

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    • 5.0 • 6 Ratings

Irish writers read and discuss a favourite story from the archives of the Stinging Fly magazine.

    Paul Lynch – 'The Dream That Wakes You Up'

    Paul Lynch – 'The Dream That Wakes You Up'

    This month on the Stinging Fly podcast, we're taking a little diversion from our usual format to present a lecture by the novelist Paul Lynch. Paul is the author of four internationally acclaimed novels: Beyond the Sea, The Black Snow, Red Sky In Morning, and Grace, which won the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year Award in 2018. He was born in Limerick, raised in Donegal, and currently lives in Dublin with his wife and two children. 

    This lecture, entitled 'The Dream That Wakes You Up', was commissioned by Words Ireland and delivered – via Zoom – to the Bray Literary Festival in September 2020. You can read this lecture, as well as previous years' lectures by Mia Gallagher and Seán O'Reilly, in full on our website: stingingfly.org. 

    • 31 min
    Rónán Hession Reads Zou Jingzhi

    Rónán Hession Reads Zou Jingzhi

    In this month's episode of the podcast, Declan Meade is joined by novelist Rónán Hession to read and discuss the story 'Eight Days', by Chinese writer Zou Jingzhi. 

    Rónán Hession is an award-winning musician and writer. He wrote and recorded music as Mumblin’ Deaf Ro and was nominated for a Choice Music Award for his album, Dictionary Crimes. Leonard And Hungry Paul, Rónán's first book, was published by Bluemoose Books in March 2019 and earned him  nominations for both Best Newcomer at the Irish Book Awards 2019 and the Dalkey Emerging Writer Award 2020.

    Zou Jingzhi is an acclaimed Chinese author who has written extensively for the stage and screen, as well as fiction and poetry. He is a founding member of theatre collective Longmashe, and his opera The Night Banquet was performed in English translation at Lincoln Centre in New York in 2002. 'Eight Days' was published in our special translation issue in Summer 2013.

    'Eight Days' was translated from the Chinese by Jeremy Tiang, who has translated novels by Yan Ge, Chan Ho-Kei, Li Er, Zhang Yueran, Yeng Pway Ngon and Lo Yi-Chin, among others. He also writes and translates plays. His novel State of Emergency won the Singapore Literature Prize in 2018. He lives in New York City.

    The Stinging Fly Podcast invites Irish writers to choose a story from the Stinging Fly archive to read and discuss. Previous episodes of the podcast can be found here. The podcast’s theme music is ‘Sale of Lakes’, by Divan. All of the Stinging Fly archive is available for everyone to read during the coronavirus crisis.

    • 39 min
    Caelainn Hogan Reads Lois Kapila

    Caelainn Hogan Reads Lois Kapila

    Caelainn Hogan is the author of Republic of Shame: Stories from Ireland's Institutions for Fallen Women, published in 2019 by Penguin. She has worked as a journalist and filed stories from all over the world for publications like National Geographic, the New York Times magazine, Harper's, the New Yorker, and The Guardian. She's also written essays and reported pieces for The Dublin Review and The Stinging Fly. 

    For this episode of the podcast, Caelainn has chosen to read 'On Non-Fiction about Housing and Homelessness', by Lois Kapila, co-founder and managing editor of The Dublin Inquirer, a reader-funded city newspaper for Dublin. Lois was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for Journalism in 2019. This piece was published online in June 2017 as a prelude to our Winter 2017 issue, which featured a special section on housing issues. Caelainn's piece 'No Shelter', also discussed in this episode, can be found in that issue too.

    The Stinging Fly Podcast invites Irish writers to choose a story from the Stinging Fly archive to read and discuss. Previous episodes of the podcast can be found here. The podcast’s theme music is ‘Sale of Lakes’, by Divan. All of the Stinging Fly archive is available for everyone to read during the coronavirus crisis.

    • 55 min
    Mark O'Connell Reads Roisín Kiberd

    Mark O'Connell Reads Roisín Kiberd

    Mark O'Connell, author of To Be A Machine and Notes from an Apocalypse, joins Ian Maleney to read and discuss 'Bland God: Notes on Mark Zuckerberg', an essay from our Summer 2018 issue written by Roisin Kiberd.

    Mark O'Connell is a writer based in Dublin. His books, To Be a Machine: Encounters With a Post-Human Future, and Notes From An Apocalypse, are published by Granta in the UK, and Doubleday in the US. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker’s “Page-Turner” blog; his work has been published in The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, The Observer, and The Independent.  He has a PhD in English Literature from Trinity College Dublin, and in 2013 his academic monograph on the work of the novelist John Banville, John Banville’s Narcissistic Fictions, was published by Palgrave Macmillan. He was an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow from 2011 to 2012 at Trinity College, where he taught contemporary literature. He won the 2018 Wellcome Book Prize for To Be A Machine, and the 2019 Rooney Prize for Irish Literature.

    Roisin Kiberd is a writer and journalist from Dublin who has written several pieces for the Stinging Fly, and her writing about modern technology has been published in The Guardian, The Dublin Review, and Vice's Motherboard, where she wrote a column about internet subcultures.

    The Stinging Fly Podcast invites Irish writers to choose a story from the Stinging Fly archive to read and discuss. Previous episodes of the podcast can be found here. The podcast’s theme music is ‘Sale of Lakes’, by Divan. All of the Stinging Fly archive is available for everyone to read during the coronavirus crisis.

    • 57 min
    Naoise Dolan Reads Emma Donoghue

    Naoise Dolan Reads Emma Donoghue

    Naoise Dolan, author of the acclaimed debut novel, Exciting Times, joins Declan Meade in studio to read and discuss the subtle gothic horror of Emma Donoghue's 'Looking for Petronilla', a story that appeared way back in Issue 11 of the magazine in Winter 2001.

    Naoise Dolan was born in Dublin, studied at Trinity College, and completed a master's degree in Victorian literature at Oxford. Her writing has featured in The Dublin Review and The Stinging Fly. Her debut novel Exciting Times has been described by Hilary Mantel as “droll, shrewd and unafraid” – it is published this month by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in the UK, and in June by Ecco in the US.

    Emma Donoghue is an Irish-Canadian playwright, literary historian, novelist, and screenwriter. Her 2010 novel Room was an international best-seller, and a finalist for the Man Booker Prize – the movie adaptation of the book was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Donoghue's 1995 novel Hood won the Stonewall Book Award, and her novel Slammerkin won the Ferro-Grumley Award for Lesbian Fiction. Her latest novel, Akin, was published last year.

    The Stinging Fly Podcast invites Irish writers to choose a story from the Stinging Fly archive to read and discuss. Previous episodes of the podcast can be found here. The podcast’s theme music is ‘Sale of Lakes’, by Divan. All of the Stinging Fly archive is available for subscribers to read – subscribe now and access 20 years of the best new writing.

    • 41 min
    Cathy Sweeney Reads 'The Chair'

    Cathy Sweeney Reads 'The Chair'

    To celebrate the publication of her debut collection, Modern Times, Cathy Sweeney reads 'The Chair', a dark and funny story from the book. 

    Modern Times is available to purchase from The Stinging Fly: https://stingingfly.org/product/modern-times/

    Praise for Modern Times:

    "Cathy Sweeney's stories have already attracted a band of fanatical devotees, and this first collection is as marvellous as we could have hoped for. A unique imagination, a brilliant debut." —Kevin Barry

    “I loved this collection. It vibrates with a glorious strangeness! Magnificently weird, hugely entertaining, deeply profound.” —Danielle McLaughlin

    “Cathy Sweeney's work is jaw-droppingly good: inventive, funny, lush. One of the best short story writers working today.” —Sinéad Gleeson

    “In Modern Times, Cathy Sweeney gives us fables of the present that are funny, vertiginous and melancholy.” —David Hayden

    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

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6 Ratings

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