49 episodes

The Story of Wales, a BBC / Open University partnership production, was a six-hour series first transmitted in 2012 on BBC ONE Wales and subsequently on BBC TWO network. This landmark series tells the story of Wales from pre-history to modern times. Its epic tale runs from Iron Age hillforts and the massive Roman presence in Wales, through Hywel Dda’s uniting of the country under one law and the battles of Welsh leaders like Llywelyn and Owain Glyndwr with Norman and English kings. The dramatic and fast moving story continues with the Welsh at the heart of the Tudor court, takes us through the immense pace of change in the country as coal mines and iron works flourished — with technological and educational innovations putting Wales ahead of the world in the Industrial Revolution - and climaxes with devolution and the creation of a Welsh Government.

BBC News at Ten presenter Huw Edwards tells this compelling story of the nation, showing how influential Wales has been down the ages. In addition to the heroes and battles, the series reveals how so often, through the turbulent centuries, Wales has been at the cutting-edge of change and innovation.

The Story of Wales Addysg Cymru - Education Wales

    • History
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

The Story of Wales, a BBC / Open University partnership production, was a six-hour series first transmitted in 2012 on BBC ONE Wales and subsequently on BBC TWO network. This landmark series tells the story of Wales from pre-history to modern times. Its epic tale runs from Iron Age hillforts and the massive Roman presence in Wales, through Hywel Dda’s uniting of the country under one law and the battles of Welsh leaders like Llywelyn and Owain Glyndwr with Norman and English kings. The dramatic and fast moving story continues with the Welsh at the heart of the Tudor court, takes us through the immense pace of change in the country as coal mines and iron works flourished — with technological and educational innovations putting Wales ahead of the world in the Industrial Revolution - and climaxes with devolution and the creation of a Welsh Government.

BBC News at Ten presenter Huw Edwards tells this compelling story of the nation, showing how influential Wales has been down the ages. In addition to the heroes and battles, the series reveals how so often, through the turbulent centuries, Wales has been at the cutting-edge of change and innovation.

    • video
    The Story of Wales Introduction

    The Story of Wales Introduction

    Huw Edwards introduces a collection of clips from his landmark BBC Wales history series, The Story of Wales.

    • 40 sec
    • video
    Daily Life of Iron Age Celts

    Daily Life of Iron Age Celts

    Between the years 600 – 800 B.C. the Celtic tribes living in Wales began to try making iron. We can see objects they made in hoards of precious things which they put into lakes as offerings to their gods. An example is the hoard found in the lake at Llyn Fawr near Hirwaun in Rhondda Cynon Taf. In the Llyn Fawr hoard, as well as locally made iron objects, there are some which were made a long way from Wales, such as part of a decorated sword-blade from eastern France. There are many places in Wales where we can see evidence of what daily life was like in this period, such as the hillfort of Tre’r Ceiri on the Llŷn Peninsula in Gwynedd. Life in a Celtic roundhouse was a busy cycle of growing, preserving and cooking food, raising animals, making cloth and fashioning tools from metal and wood. Women as well as men could be leaders, and children were essential to the family economy.

    • 5 min
    Daily Life of Iron Age Celts

    Daily Life of Iron Age Celts

    Between the years 600 – 800 B.C. the Celtic tribes living in Wales began to try making iron. We can see objects they made in hoards of precious things which they put into lakes as offerings to their gods. An example is the hoard found in the lake at Llyn Fawr near Hirwaun in Rhondda Cynon Taf. In the Llyn Fawr hoard, as well as locally made iron objects, there are some which were made a long way from Wales, such as part of a decorated sword-blade from eastern France. There are many places in Wales where we can see evidence of what daily life was like in this period, such as the hillfort of Tre’r Ceiri on the Llŷn Peninsula in Gwynedd. Life in a Celtic roundhouse was a busy cycle of growing, preserving and cooking food, raising animals, making cloth and fashioning tools from metal and wood. Women as well as men could be leaders, and children were essential to the family economy.

    • video
    Roman Caerleon

    Roman Caerleon

    After the Roman invasion of Britain on AD 43, it took thirty years to subdue the Celtic tribes in the area we now call Wales. A key point of control was the legionary fortress of Isca in modern Caerleon which was built in the territory of the fierce Silures. But eventually the tribe submitted to Roman rule and joined the economy and lifestyle of the Empire. Recent discoveries have revealed a large civilian settlement outside the powerful fortress, with docks for goods brought from the Mediterranean. The scale of Roman presence in Wales is bigger than we used to think.

    • 6 min
    Roman Caerleon

    Roman Caerleon

    After the Roman invasion of Britain on AD 43, it took thirty years to subdue the Celtic tribes in the area we now call Wales. A key point of control was the legionary fortress of Isca in modern Caerleon which was built in the territory of the fierce Silures. But eventually the tribe submitted to Roman rule and joined the economy and lifestyle of the Empire. Recent discoveries have revealed a large civilian settlement outside the powerful fortress, with docks for goods brought from the Mediterranean. The scale of Roman presence in Wales is bigger than we used to think.

    • video
    Normans and Castles

    Normans and Castles

    William of Normandy (William the Conqueror) invaded England and defeated the English king, Harold in 1066. He rewarded the lords who had supported him with grants of land along the border between England and Wales. These areas were known as marches. Norman Marcher Lords pushed into Welsh territory and began to build castles: motte-and-bailey castles at first, using timber and earth, then increasingly imposing castles of stone with complex fortifications. Welsh resistance meant that the Norman campaign lasted hundreds of years. Caerphilly Castle is the largest Norman castle in Wales and one of the most ingenious in the design of its defences. Begun in 1268, it helped to inspire the design of the castles Edward I built across Wales to ensure his control of the country. The Normans employed some of Europe’s most gifted master masons and craftsmen in their castle-building.

    • 5 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Morgan Jones ,

The Story of Wales

A fascinating insight into where the true Britain's are living now.
Pushing the Brits back into the furthest Westerly point now called Wales.
A brilliant true piece of history.

AnniePannie99 ,

Bringing history alive

Great clips

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