1,000 episodes

"The Virtual Vicar". Positive Pete presents shows on news, politics and Christianity with Beryl Polden and Mark Peacey.

The Virtual Vicar Peter Timothy Cooper

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

"The Virtual Vicar". Positive Pete presents shows on news, politics and Christianity with Beryl Polden and Mark Peacey.

    Business is drowning in too many emails

    Business is drowning in too many emails

    Chances are, your inbox holds a wide assortment of email — from spam to newsletters to discount offers to important communications from your boss or colleagues. Business receive and send many emails internally and externally any many of these actually hinder communication. Mark and Pete delve into this thorny issue and ask how can we stop getting buried under all the excess information and drowning in too many emails?

    • 12 min
    Amazon wellness booths backfire

    Amazon wellness booths backfire

    In one of its most dystopian moves yet, Amazon is introducing tiny booths where its overworked warehouse employees can momentarily escape a job so grueling, many employees say they don't feel like they have enough time to even use the bathroom.

    The "ZenBooth'' or "Mindful Practice Room," as it's called, is part of the WorkingWell program Amazon announced on May 17. According to an Amazon press release, WorkingWell is a mix of "physical and mental activities, wellness exercises, and healthy eating support” meant to “help them recharge and reenergize." One of the WorkingWell initiatives is AmaZen, which “guides employees through mindfulness practices in individual interactive kiosks at buildings,” according to a press release

    • 6 min
    Why does the Eurovision song contest hate the UK?

    Why does the Eurovision song contest hate the UK?

    Britain came last and Italy won, what exactly happened. Does everyone hate the British? Should the whole Eurovision Song Contest be stopped? Mark and Pete have the definitive answer.
    At the 65th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest, it set the next debacle for Germany. Jendrik Sigwart (26) landed on a disappointing 25th place with his song “I Don’t Feel Hate” and was penultimate. The big winner of the evening in the Ahoy Arena in Rotterdam was the rock band Måneskin from Italy, who won the race in a real heart-stopping final.

    Sigwart, according to ESC commentator legend Peter Urban (73), the “whirlwind against hateful messages on the Internet”, started the race with start number 15. The 26-year-old musical performer danced, sang and ukulelte quite energetically through his title. But a staid vocal performance and an exuberant performance, including a trumpet solo with a dancing peace sign or middle finger, apparently failed to score points with either the ESC audience or the jury.
    Italy wins thanks to the crowd
    The national juries gave Sigwart a meager three points – two from Austria and one from Romania. Only Great Britain (James Newman – “Emers”) got even fewer points, namely zero. Switzerland fought head-to-head with its artist Gjon’s Tears (22) and his song “Tout l’univers” and France with singer Barbara Pravi (28) and her classic chanson song “Voilà”. In the end, Gjon’s Tears greeted from first place with 267 points. Pravi was close behind with 248 points.

    But with the voices of the audience, everything could change. However, Great Britain did not get any points from the spectators either. Just like Sigwart. With that, the 25th place was finally cemented. In the further course everything was whirled around quite tremendously. Italy, which the rock band Måneskin had put in the running with their song “Zitti E Buoni”, suddenly found itself very popular with the audience and took first place.

    But it should actually take until the very last point announcement before the decision was made. Because until the end, Switzerland had the opportunity to overtake Italy. But nothing came of it. The points of the audience voting were not enough to dispute Italy for victory. So it was clear: Måneskin are the winners of the ESC 2021 ahead of France and Switzerland.

    Two artists tested positive
    In April, the Dutch government declared the huge event a test case and allowed 3,500 viewers each to the nine shows, including six public rehearsals, the two semi-finals and the final. The show was based on an extensive test concept. All employees, journalists and artists had to show a negative corona test every two days in order to even get into the arena.

    And in fact there were two corona cases in the field of participants. First known that a member of the Icelandic band Daði og Gagnamagnið tested positive for the coronavirus. The band had then decided to withdraw from all appearances at the live shows. Duncan Laurence (27), who brought the contest to the Netherlands with his victory two years ago, also tested positive a short time later. Laurence should have presented his winning title “Arcade” on stage during the finale. His performance was shown on a video clip.

    • 9 min
    Celebrity Awards are a Waste of Time.

    Celebrity Awards are a Waste of Time.

    BRIT Awards 2021 has kicked off recently with some of the UK's biggest celebrities hitting the red carpet for its annual award ceremony. Many of this large celebrities wore seriously odd outfits, why? Are awards ceremonies for celebrities all they're cracked up to be? Mark and Pete have the answers.

    • 9 min
    How to give a tip when you don't give two hoots.

    How to give a tip when you don't give two hoots.

    Do you use Tipjar?Tipping expectations vary by culture and by service industry. Although tipping is a common practice in the United States in some other cultures or situations, giving a tip is not expected, and offering one could even be considered condescending or demeaning. In the UK situation varies. But what of the customer, why are we put in this position? Mark and Pete have the answers.

    • 11 min
    Lockdown Blues? Doctors say "take a hike!"

    Lockdown Blues? Doctors say "take a hike!"

    MARK AND PETE LIVE. Doctors say that going for a good walk is an effective way to combat the stresses surrounding Covid-19, and it doesn't have to cost the earth to reap the benefits. As studies show the impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on mental health, more people are turning to exercise to boost their spirits. Physical activity is well known to benefit the body by keeping you strong, reducing the risk of certain diseases and helping maintain a healthy weight. In recent months, many people were forced to spend long periods of time at home due to the coronavirus pandemic and exercise has become a cathartic way of tackling stress and beating boredom. Numerous studies conducted since March, when lockdown increasingly came into force worldwide, have shown the toll of Covid-19 on our mental health. Mark and Pete look at this prescription for mental health: get well, take a hike!

    • 14 min

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