1 hr 28 min

Conversation with David O'Hanlon – Beyond organised religion Urgency of Change - The Krishnamurti Podcast

    • Philosophy

Daniel O’Hanlon was a Jesuit priest and respected theologian. He taught at Marymount University in Los Angeles and for more than 30 years at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. He had many contacts in other religions, particularly of Asia, and included aspects of these religions in his teaching. Interested in integration of religions, in 1984 he published Integration of Christian Practices: A Western Christian Looks East. This conversation with Krishnamurti, recorded in Malibu, California in 1972, asks whether organised religion brings about real depth of understanding. Does the past have any value in coming upon something new? Can the mind empty itself of the pettiness of what man has put together? Thought can be used legitimately and illegitimately. Krishnamurti urges us to find out if there is something beyond tradition and myth. Find us online at kfoundation.org and on social media as Krishnamurti Foundation Trust

Daniel O’Hanlon was a Jesuit priest and respected theologian. He taught at Marymount University in Los Angeles and for more than 30 years at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. He had many contacts in other religions, particularly of Asia, and included aspects of these religions in his teaching. Interested in integration of religions, in 1984 he published Integration of Christian Practices: A Western Christian Looks East. This conversation with Krishnamurti, recorded in Malibu, California in 1972, asks whether organised religion brings about real depth of understanding. Does the past have any value in coming upon something new? Can the mind empty itself of the pettiness of what man has put together? Thought can be used legitimately and illegitimately. Krishnamurti urges us to find out if there is something beyond tradition and myth. Find us online at kfoundation.org and on social media as Krishnamurti Foundation Trust

1 hr 28 min

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