53 episodes

Hi. I'm Em. I love movies and tv. I also talk a lot. A podcast was therefore inevitable...
Join me on my journey through the history and legacy of movies you know, and movies you don't.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Verbal Diorama Verbal Diorama

    • Film History
    • 5.0, 22 Ratings

Hi. I'm Em. I love movies and tv. I also talk a lot. A podcast was therefore inevitable...
Join me on my journey through the history and legacy of movies you know, and movies you don't.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Serenity (2005)

    Serenity (2005)

    Serenity, the continuation and culmination of Joss Whedon's one-season space western TV show Firefly, had the full backing of Universal after acquiring the rights of Firefly from Fox, who really didn't have a clue what Firefly was, or even the common decency to air all the episodes in order.... this is not the first time Fox have been world-class a-holes on something I've featured on this podcast.
    Although arguably Serenity exists because of Universal's desire for the project, Joss Whedon's skills as a writer/director and the returning cast for bringing these beloved characters back to life, it actually exists because of one reason:
    The Browncoats.
    Fandom is power, passion, strength and unity. Fandom grew Firefly and made Serenity happen. Without the Browncoats, we would never have had Serenity. They don't just aim to misbehave, they aim to transform this miscarriage of justice.
    Although fandom wasn't enough to resurrect Firefly for a second season or create a sequel to Serenity, the fact we got Serenity at all is miraculous. This cancelled TV show, this ragtag crew of underdogs ended up with a feature length movie that introduced new characters, tied up arcs, looked and sounded beautiful and was a worthy end to the stories of Mal Reynolds and his crew. It was also loved by fans and critically acclaimed. That just doesn't happen for one-season TV shows, let alone TV shows that were unduly cancelled.
    Firefly and Serenity are the rare and precious jewels in Joss Whedon's crown. Or should that be his pretty floral bonnet.....?
    I would love to hear your thoughts on Serenity or Firefly!
    GET IN TOUCH....
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    SUPPORT VERBAL DIORAMA....
    Leave a 5-star rating/review: Apple Podcasts or Podchaser 
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    Thank you to all the patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy, Mike and new patron Griff!

    EPISODE THANKS TO....
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    And a special thanks to Hellboy writer @ThePeterBriggs for a wonderful little anecdote about his small involvement in the production!
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    Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song
    Music by Chloe Enticott - Compositions by Chloe Facebook
    Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!)
    Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studios.

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    • 59 min
    The Nice Guys

    The Nice Guys

    The Nice Guys, upon its release in May 2016, found itself facing off against a comedy sequel, an animated movie of a million-selling mobile game and two separate superhero franchise sequels. It's really no wonder it suffered at the U.S. box office. An original idea, from the always brilliant mind of Shane Black, needed room to breathe and find its feet. Sadly, it never got to do that. Had it been released in June, like it was supposed to, it might have made the $217 million that the other comedy buddy movie it swapped release dates with did. Can you tell I'm bitter about that? 
    The Nice Guys had two big name stars (Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling), several up-and-comers (Margaret Qualley and the terrific Angourie Rice) and a Hollywood icon (Kim Basinger) in its cast. It followed Shane Black's other directorial efforts; his debut Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and the 20th highest grossing movie of all time, Iron Man 3. It's really quite brilliant, actually. 
    For the titular (and ironic) "nice guys who aren't actually nice guys"; as Private Investigator Holland March, Ryan Gosling excels at physical comedy, with Russell Crowe's Jackson Healy as the grumpy tough-guy straight man. As casting decisions for a comedy go, you'd never suspect they'd be this perfect together, but they are.
    The script is witty, dark and hilarious. The setting, 1977 Los Angeles, centred around the adult movie industry, feels seedy yet exuberant.
    Seriously - this movie should have made buckets of cash!!
    Although The Nice Guys failed commercially, critically it passed with flying colours. The few who did see it raved about it and arguably it's well on its way to cult classic status. It deserves to be talked about on a podcast, and most importantly it deserves to be watched and enjoyed. I really do think it's one of Shane Black's best.
    I would love to hear your thoughts on The Nice Guys!
    GET IN TOUCH....
    Twitter @verbaldiorama
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    Website verbaldiorama.com

    SUPPORT VERBAL DIORAMA....
    Leave a 5-star rating/review: Apple Podcasts or Podchaser 
    Join the Patreon: patreon.com/verbaldiorama
    Thank you to all the patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy and Mike

    EPISODE THANKS TO....
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    Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song
    Music by Chloe Enticott - Compositions by Chloe Facebook
    Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!)
    Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studios.

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    • 36 min
    Down With Love

    Down With Love

    Paying tribute to the classic no-sex sex comedies from the late '50s and early '60s, Down With Love is a wonderful, bright, kitschy romcom classic that seems to be well regarded, if not completely well remembered.
    Renee Zellweger (fresh from Chicago) and Ewan McGregor (fresh from Moulin Rouge) tackle roles similar to those made famous by girl-next-door-turned-sex-symbol Doris Day and serious-actor-turned-romantic-lead Rock Hudson, in a genuinely wonderful pastiche to their movies Pillow Talk (1959), Lover Come Back (1961) and Send Me No Flowers (1964). (I watched Pillow Talk as part of my prep for this episode, and I have to say it's a truly delightful movie and Doris Day is incredible in it! Please watch it if you can!)
    Down With Love is so impressive in its desire to not only be set in the sixties, but also to be filmed like it were filmed in the Sixties. It's meant to look like it was filmed in Technicolor. The thought that went into it is insane, from authentic props and vintage fabrics for costuming, to wanting the sets to actually look just like sets. Down With Love is not a film steeped in realistic depictions of 1962 New York. It's meant to look wonky. It relishes, and adores, the world its set in. The entire cast look like they're having the best time ever.
    Did I mention how hot Ewan McGregor is? I'm not sure I did....
    And if, like me, you start the movie as a Down With Love girl (or guy, or person), you'll end it stating "Here's To Love".
    I would love to hear your thoughts on Down With Love!
    GET IN TOUCH....
    Twitter @verbaldiorama
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    Email verbaldiorama [at] gmail [dot] com
    Website verbaldiorama.com

    SUPPORT VERBAL DIORAMA....
    Leave a 5-star rating/review: Apple Podcasts or Podchaser 
    Join the Patreon: patreon.com/verbaldiorama
    Thank you to all the patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy and Mike

    EPISODE THANKS TO....
    Twitter peeps
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    Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song
    Music by Chloe Enticott - Compositions by Chloe Facebook
    Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!)
    Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studios.

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    • 44 min
    Toy Story

    Toy Story

    Here we are.... 50 episodes later! It's been a genuine delight to produce fifty episodes of this podcast and I wanted to do something special for #50.
    There's no animated movie so ingrained in modern culture, so beloved by everyone and such a pioneer in modern animation than Pixar's Toy Story. But I didn't just want to tell the story of Toy Story, because the story of Pixar is integral to the story of Toy Story.
    Pixar knew they wanted to make the first feature-length fully computer animated film. They knew they could do it. They just had to figure out how....
    The whole creation of Toy Story was fraught with issues. It's remarkable it ever made it to the screen at all.
    But it did, and look what it did.....
    The early test animation for Toy Story, featuring a completely different character of Woody, can be found here
    The Toy Story full length live-action remake can be found here
    Whether this is your first episode listening or your 50th episode.... thanks for being here. I've really appreciated your support. Here's to the next 50 episodes (or infinity!) and beyond....!
    I would love to hear your thoughts on Toy Story!
    GET IN TOUCH....
    Twitter @verbaldiorama
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    Email verbaldiorama [at] gmail [dot] com
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    SUPPORT VERBAL DIORAMA....
    Leave a 5-star rating/review: Apple Podcasts or Podchaser 
    Join the Patreon: patreon.com/verbaldiorama
    Thank you to all the patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy and Mike

    EPISODE THANKS TO....
    Twitter peeps
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    Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song
    Music by Chloe Enticott - Compositions by Chloe Facebook
    Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!)
    Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studios.

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    • 54 min
    The Muppets

    The Muppets

    It’s time to play the music, it’s time to light the lights, it’s time to meet The Muppets on Verbal Diorama tonight... today...
    In this special Patron-chosen episode, I go behind the curtain on 2011's The Muppets. The Muppets have been in everyone's lives, whether through The Muppet Show, the eight big screen offerings, or just through general media. Kermit, Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, Gonzo, Animal et al. are some of the most famous faces and names in Hollywood.
    This episode is a little different to most episodes of Verbal Diorama. I wanted to pay tribute to The Muppets, to this movie and to the people behind the scenes, but without losing any of the magic that make The Muppets such a unique and wonderful part of all our lives. It's important to have those warm, safe feelings of nostalgia and also to introduce the things we love to the next generation.
    The Muppets teach us to always be kind, to love others and yourself and to embrace your weirdness. We could all do with more of The Muppets in our lives.
    Whether you're a man or a muppet, or just having a me party, life's a happy song when you look at the pictures in your head. So join the lovers, the dreamers and me in finding the rainbow connection. 

    I would love to hear your thoughts on The Muppets!
    GET IN TOUCH....
    Twitter @verbaldiorama
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    Email verbaldiorama [at] gmail [dot] com
    Website verbaldiorama.com

    SUPPORT VERBAL DIORAMA....
    Leave a 5-star rating/review: Apple Podcasts or Podchaser 
    Join the Patreon: patreon.com/verbaldiorama
    Thank you to all the patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy and Mike

    EPISODE THANKS TO....
    Twitter peeps
    @MoviesWork
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    Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song
    Music by Chloe Enticott - Compositions by Chloe Facebook
    Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!)
    Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studios.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 37 min
    The Thing (1982)

    The Thing (1982)

    When it came to thinking of a horror movie I'd love to feature, The Thing (1982) was top of my list. It's not a movie most would associate with someone who admits to not liking horror, but the combination of science fiction and horror remains one of my favourite genre mixes (see also Alien!)
    It's also a movie that continues to delight and terrify me. The practical effects, created by Rob Bottin (only 21 years of age at the time) still hold up as visually inventive, repulsive and unforgettable, almost 40 years later. It's an accolade that the recent 2011 prequel could never have lived up to (and yes, I saw it recently, so I will talk about it a little, if only to serve as a highlight to how excellent the 1982 movie really is!)
    On the surface a graphic, gory body horror, but it's not the gore that makes it scary, it's the emotional and mental horror, as it depicts the descent into fear, madness and paranoia that this group of twelve men encounter and the toxic masculinity which prevents them from actually working together to face their fears.
    The titular alien, nameless and faceless, remains sentient even at a cellular level, which adds to the fear factor. How do you know every cell of The Thing is dead? It's a stark contrast to 1982's other well-known alien movie, where that alien (E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial) is sweet, kind and befriends small children.
    Then critically derided, now critically lauded; it's a true masterclass in showing the isolation and despair of the characters and the lengths to which The Thing will go to survive, gift wrapped in glorious nightmare-fuel special effects by Rob Bottin.
    But how do you know this is the real episode 48? Could it just be a copy? Look for the light in my eyes....
    The original Randall William Cook stop-motion Blair-Thing can be seen in this clip here
    The Fangoria art contest entries from 1981 are available to view here!
    I would love to hear your thoughts on The Thing! You can get in touch on
    Twitter @verbaldiorama
    Instagram @verbaldiorama
    Facebook @verbaldiorama
    Letterboxd @verbaldiorama
    or you can email me general hellos, feedback or suggestions:
    verbaldiorama [at] gmail [dot] com or visit the website at https://verbaldiorama.com
    Thank you to patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy and new patron Mike for supporting Verbal Diorama.
    You can rate or review the show at Apple Podcasts or Podchaser and I'd very much appreciate that!
    Thanks to the following for their contributions to this episode:
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    Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song
    Music by Chloe Enticott - Compositions by Chloe Facebook
    Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!)
    Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studios.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

afcfilmgeek ,

Great solo podcast

Listened to Matrix episode and was a really great listen. Very knowledgeable on the chosen film subject.

anightmarepod ,

Fun and educational

Long time fan of Verbal Diorama. Episodes are well researched and well delivered, I constantly find myself saying 'huh, I never knew that'. Would highly recommend.

orcadian1903 ,

Superb podcast

I am a Film Studies teacher and I am impressed by the amount of insightful detail and effort that is put into each of these podcasts. They certainly provide something different from all the others that I have listened to. Highly recommended!

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