15 episodes

The podcast exploring Georgian polyphonic songs, and the women who sing them. Hosted by Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson.

Voices of the Ancestors Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

The podcast exploring Georgian polyphonic songs, and the women who sing them. Hosted by Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson.

    Singing Landscapes, from Georgia to the Balkans with Briget Boyle

    Singing Landscapes, from Georgia to the Balkans with Briget Boyle

    In this episode, our friend Jen Morris takes over the role of interviewer. She speaks with Briget Boyle, vocal coach and singer with Balkan Women's ensemble @kitka, bringing the west coast USA perspective to ‘Voices of the Ancestors’.

    They chat about:-
    working with powerful female teachers like Tamar Buadze, in Georgia and Svetlana Spajić in Serbia.
    How to sing ‘folk music’ from a grounded, rooted place in your own landscape.
    Briget’s insight into what ‘Voices of the Ancestors’ means for her, describing three types of ancestors - genetic, spiritual and ‘humanity’.

    Briget shares experiences with Georgian songs in Temple of Light Choir directed by Kristine Barrett (a sort of Kitka community choir) and in True Life Trio. Jen shares experiences of her Georgian choir ‘onefourfive’ and Seattle's balkan women's ensemble @Dunava

    Donate to help tell more women's stories:-
    https://ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors
    https://www.patreon.com/voicesoftheancestors

    Join our community facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/516207299354485

    Sign up for our email updates and never miss an episode: eepurl.com/hhgoOf
    Searchable transcript, available here voicesoftheancestors.co.uk/transcripts.

    Music:
    Mother, Moon,/ It Will Never Again Be What it Was, / and Love from True Life Trio’s album “Like Never, Like Always”.
    Shen Khar Venakhi, from Kitka’s album “The Vine”,
    Mokle Mravalzhamier from Ensemble Zedashe’s album “Our Earth and Water”
    Tamar Buadze and Teona Kutsia sing a mashup of a Spanish song and Laz song, simply titled Espanur-Laz, which is available on YouTube.
    Ukrainian folk song Vdova, sung by Ukrainian ensemble Drevo.
    Serbian Medley, from Dunava’s album Behind the Veil.
    Bedinera from the CD: Teach Yourself Megrelian Songs, by Polikarpe in a trio.
    Žegar Polye, or Žegar Field Feeds My Lamb, from Svetlana Spajić.

    • 58 min
    12: Following the Stories

    12: Following the Stories

    In the final episode of series 1, Susan and Holly take you on a whistle-stop tour of their recent encounters.

    First we meet Tamar Buadze in Rustavi where she's started an open-air community singing initiative.

    After Rustavi, join your hosts in Shilda where they unearth the start of a fascinating story linking the women’s ensemble Nelkarisi with Magda Kevlishvili from Mtiebi and Sagalobeli a pleading/begging song.

    And finally take a mini visit to the Folk School in Telavi, sharing a spine-tingling rendition of Tsintskaro with ensemble Mze Shina.

    Help Susan and Holly shape the future of the podcast by completing the survey. Survey Link: https://bit.ly/VOAsurvey

    To commission an episode go to https://ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors/commissions

    Voices of the Ancestors by Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson.
    Help the podcast become sustainable and launch Series 2 in autumn 2021 by becoming a monthly Ko-Fi subscriber at ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors
    Support the podcast on patreon https://www.patreon.com/voicesoftheancestors
    Sign up for our email updates and never miss an episode (and receive news about Voices of the Ancestors, Clapham Omnibus theatre residency in July 2021): eepurl.com/hhgoOf
    Navigate this episode with the searchable transcript, available here voicesoftheancestors.co.uk/transcripts.

    Music (pre-recorded): Tsinskaro, Mze Shina;
    Live recordings:Tamar Buadze and the Rustavi community workshop; Naniko (retired member of Nelkarisi Ensemble); Kasletila (from concert with Sakhioba in Udabno)

    • 18 min
    11: Khatia Turmanidze Finds Her Voice

    11: Khatia Turmanidze Finds Her Voice

    Meet 17 year old Khatia, who lives 700 metres above sea level in the singing village of Merisi in Ajara, West Georgia.

    Despite being 2 hours from the nearest city, Khatia is not cut off - She has friends all over the world who have come to learn songs from her family - from Melbourne Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Austria, Ireland, UK and beyond.

    Hear how she was finally convinced to join in her family’s songs around the supra table.

    Enjoy the sounds of Merisi, like the babbling waterfalling and the singing birds recorded live on our trip there in April.

    To watch Ialoni's concert for Oxford Contemporary Music go to https://www.ocmevents.org/whats-on/ialoni

    To watch the video of the 'supra in the road' go to: https://vimeo.com/26926089?fbclid=IwAR1jZXHirEAwroF6L3TQHsle0P0DFLmCpKAveXLDXMnmTMQCyrrfrbz5GXQ

    Voices of the Ancestors by Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson.

    If you enjoyed this episode, why not buy the creators a coffee?
    On ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors or Support the podcast on patreon https://www.patreon.com/voicesoftheancestors

    Help the podcast become sustainable by becoming a monthly Ko-Fi subscriber with access to extras (for this episode monthly subscribers can see videos of Nana singing during the interview).

    Sign up for our email updates and never miss an episode: eepurl.com/hhgoOf
    Navigate this episode with the searchable transcript, available here voicesoftheancestors.co.uk/transcripts.

    Music in this episode: Ialoni, Sakhioba, Eteri Darchidze, the Turmanidze family and the Eclesiastical Chant University of Tbilisi.

    • 42 min
    Musical Games in a Folk Family with Nana Mzhavanadze - Episode 10

    Musical Games in a Folk Family with Nana Mzhavanadze - Episode 10

    Georgian musician and ethnomusicologist Nana Mzhavanadze was born into a musical family. She says her future was predicted by her grandmother:-
    “when I was bought from the maternity house, my grandmother met me at the door, that was the first thing that she did, she put me on the piano and she said she is going to be a musician.”
    This episode is a significant event for their family, as it brought Nana, her uncle Rebuli and his daughter Marekhi together to sing for the first time in over 10 years.

    Whether you’ve heard Nana before, with Sathanao or Sisa Tura, or this is your first time, you're sure to enjoy this playful hour where Nana experiments musically with her family.

    Voices of the Ancestors by Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not buy the creators a coffee?
    On ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors or support the podcast on patreon https://www.patreon.com/voicesoftheancestors

    Help the podcast become sustainable by becoming a monthly Ko-Fi subscriber with access to extras (for this episode monthly subscribers can see videos of Nana singing during the interview).

    Sign up for our email updates and never miss an episode: eepurl.com/hhgoOf
    Navigate this episode with the searchable transcript, available here voicesoftheancestors.co.uk/transcripts.

    Live Music: Nana, Rebuli and Marekhi Mzhavandanze - Recorded on location, at General TSO fusion cafe, Kobuleti, Georgia.
    *Didi khnidan Gagitsani in 3 voices, with Marekhi singing bani *Patara Sakhvarelo (in 2 voices - Nana and Rebuli) Note from Nana - Patara Sakhvarelo This is a Gurian (polyphonic) male trio repertoire. The lyrics are related to the theme of love. This variant is close to Vladimer Verdzenishvili's variant… *Alilo by Jansung Kakhidze *Mival Guriashi

    Prerecorded Music: Natvra by Sathanao; Kakhetian Mravaljhamier by Basiani; Sulo Chemo by Anchiskati; Sulo Chemo by Sathanao.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Episode 9: Behind the Scenes with Ialoni in Adjara

    Episode 9: Behind the Scenes with Ialoni in Adjara

    An audio journey through the mountains of high Adjara, following ensemble Ialoni as they film for the American Library of Congress.

    The Ialoni Homegrown Concert is available for free on The American Folklife Center youtube channel.
    Youtube link: https://youtu.be/CU7KO28QDDk

    Holly and Susan chat about the trip from Tbilisi to Shuakhevi and beyond. After walking through snow, Susan meets with elders from a creative family - P’at’i Tapaladze (featured in Ialoni’s concert) her daughter Eteri. With the aid of an interpreter, we hear the voices of P’at’i and Eteri as they speak about the ancestors. There are ‘in the moment’ delights while Ialoni and P’at’i sing ‘behind the scenes’. As a final surprise the location shifts to Ozurgeti in Guria and a meeting with singing elder - Rebuli Mzhavanadze (Dr Nana Mzhavanadze’s uncle).
    With excerpts from the book ‘Performance of Georgian Folk Song’ by Edisher Garakanidze, Tbilisi 2007, ISBN 99940-933-2-0.

    Voices of the Ancestors by Holly Taylor-Zuntz and Susan Thompson.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not buy the creators a coffee?
    On ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors
    Become a monthly supporter on ko-fi with access to extras, like the video scrapbook of the trip with Ialoni into the mountains of Adjara. Support the podcast on patreon https://www.patreon.com/voicesoftheancestors

    Sign up for our email updates and never miss an episode: eepurl.com/hhgoOf

    Navigate this episode with the searchable transcript, complete with time stamps, available here voicesoftheancestors.co.uk/transcripts

    To be invited to the Voices of the Ancestors Community - on Facebook click this link www.facebook.com/groups/516207299354485/

    Music used: Ialoni (www.ialoni.bandcamp.com/); Nai-nai - Ialoni and P’at’i Tapaladze recording by Leo Decristoforo; P’at’i Tapaladze field recording by Susan Thompson; Batonebo - Ialoni and Rebuli Mzhavanadze field recording by Susan Thompson.

    • 23 min
    Episode 8: From Georgia to Great Britain and back with Tamara Vepkhvadze

    Episode 8: From Georgia to Great Britain and back with Tamara Vepkhvadze

    How did the Summer Song Festival with Katie Melua come about?
    How are Georgian 'Shairebi' like Rap?
    How do the very young learn to sing 'in voices'?

    We talk about passing on the flame with Tamara Vepkhvadze, founder of Gonieri Georgian Art Studio in North London. She has taught at the First Georgian Supplementary School in the UK and trained as a puppeteer at the Little Angel Theatre. She now lives in Georgia and passes songs from Amer-Imeri back to her kids in the UK through online lessons.

    Navigate this episode with the searchable transcript, complete with time stamps, available here voicesoftheancestors.co.uk/transcripts

    If you enjoyed this episode, why not buy the creators a coffee?
    On ko-fi.com/voicesoftheancestors
    Become a monthly supporter on ko-fi with access to extras, like the full uninterrupted edition of our conversation with Joan Mills.
    Or support the podcast on patreon https://www.patreon.com/voicesoftheancestors

    Sign up for our email updates and never miss an episode: eepurl.com/hhgoOf

    To be invited to the Voices of the Ancestors Community - on Facebook click this link www.facebook.com/groups/516207299354485/
    You might need to like our page first www.facebook.com/georgianpolyphony

    Music used:
    Ialoni (www.ialoni.bandcamp.com):
    Katie Melua
    The Chamgeliani Sisters
    Tabuni
    Sakhioba (@sakhioba)
    Maspindzeli and Anano Dadalauri

    • 1 hr 7 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

MirandaGKayM ,

Beautiful Unique Earworm!

Adore this, such a warm, enthusiastic podcast delving into the world of Georgian polyphonic song. The sense of community is wonderful, and quite inspiring in this mad time that is 2020-21. Recommend to any vaguely curious listeners searching for a new podcast!

bee_franz ,

Fascinating & beautiful podcast

This is such an interesting podcast, featuring beautiful voices, stories and songs from Georgia. Full of emotion, heart and wonderful music. I had no knowledge of this topic before listening, but I love hearing from the people, teachers and singers of these traditional songs - a hidden gem of the world.

ClaireCreativityFound ,

Really interesting

I have done a little polyphonic singing but you don’t need to know what it is or be an expert to enjoy these chats. Well done

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