13 episodes

Interested in Neuroscience research? Frustrated by hyped up media headlines? Science paywalls obstructing your fact checking ability? We've got you covered. Journal club video podcast giving scientists a platform to control the scientific narrative & dispel the misinformation surrounding their science.

First-Person Science First-Person Science

    • Life Sciences

Interested in Neuroscience research? Frustrated by hyped up media headlines? Science paywalls obstructing your fact checking ability? We've got you covered. Journal club video podcast giving scientists a platform to control the scientific narrative & dispel the misinformation surrounding their science.

    How Everyone Can Stand Up To Science Misinformation | Roots Of First-Person Science | FPS#13

    How Everyone Can Stand Up To Science Misinformation | Roots Of First-Person Science | FPS#13

    In this video we discuss the root causes and some extreme examples of fake news in science. How can we work together to stop this ongoing trend of misinformation and anti-science activism? The structure of the information, the literacy of the consumer, and the accessibility of the material determine how the information is used, by whom, and the influence it ultimately has on a group, community, or society. However, there is perhaps a more dangerous perspective; that the way information is presented has the potential to misrepresent and distort, with important parallels and implication for engagement with research, media, and public policy in public forums, such as twitter and facebook. In some cases, if a series of google searches reveals informative (yet incomplete) summaries of evidence that misrepresent the rigor and strength of the component studies, it has the potential to change practice in a way that may be deleterious to future science, medicine, & public discussion.Special Thanks to GradCast for hosting this episode and supporting the fight again Science Misinformation! Check out the full episode on their website: www.gradcast.ca or their youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQOc6TUPpSADZW7_hanKHEQProduced by Roger Hudson, PhDcDirected by Dr. Mina Nashed, PhDVisual Effects by Dr. Stephen Daniels, PhDAudio Mixing by Dr. Paul Sheppard, PhDDigital Marketing by Bryan Jenkins, PhDcTheme music: MegaDisko by Navigator Black & the Indighost

    • 17 min
    Public Distrust In Science Explained | Why Media Is Wrong About Cannabis Science | FPS#12

    Public Distrust In Science Explained | Why Media Is Wrong About Cannabis Science | FPS#12

    What is the value of science communication if there is distrust in the accuracy, completeness, or truthfulness of the information presented? Media will often use strategies of selectivity to present a narrative that is most appealing to their financial interests (cannabis causes schizophrenia? Find out tonight at 6), but do not work to benefit the public whatsoever. In fact, these techniques to conceal some information, while bringing other info to light actively works against the interest of the public, and instead dissuades critical thinking and further fact checking, ultimately creating confusion and causing more harm than good. The structure of the information, the literacy of the consumer, and the accessibility of the material determine how the information is used, by whom, and the influence it ultimately has on a group, community, or society.We planned to give you Dr. Christopher Norris's work on the positive vs negative effects of cannabis intoxication (euphoria vs anxiety) and the associated biomarkers, but we got into a discussion on the problems with pop-science & science communication - from scientist communication fails, to public ignorance, to flat out fake news portrayed by media. Stay tuned for this exciting cannabis-related episode coming soon!Produced by Roger Hudson, PhDcDirected by Dr. Mina Nashed, PhDVisual Effects by Dr. Stephen Daniels, PhDAudio Mixing by Dr. Paul Sheppard, PhDDigital Marketing by Bryan Jenkins, PhDcTheme music: MegaDisko by Navigator Black & the Indighost

    • 28 min
    How Nicotine Primes The Teenage Brain For Depression & Anxiety In Adulthood | FPS#11

    How Nicotine Primes The Teenage Brain For Depression & Anxiety In Adulthood | FPS#11

    Education about the health harms of tobacco have driven nicotine use down across all age groups for several decades. However, since 2016 the rate of adolescent and teenage nicotine use has nearly tripled, most commonly in the form of e-vapes (juuling). Although nicotine vapour May potentially be less harmful to overall health than tobacco smoke, a wealth of research identifies that nicotine exposure during adolescence or teenage years dramatically increases the risk for leader mental health disorders including depression and anxiety, independent of whether the individual continues to use nicotine products later into adulthood. These largely overlooked mental health consequences to later life, as well as potential negative outcomes for multiple generations on offspring of the nicotine user amount to largely unknown consequences of adolescent nicotine exposure.In this episode, Roger Hudson joins asked to speak about his recent manuscript exploring the presence of persistent mood and anxiety disorders following nicotine exposure throat adolescence, published in the Journal Addiction Biology. Manuscript Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/adb.12891Produced by Roger Hudson, PhDcDirected by Dr. Mina Nashed, PhDVisual Effects by Dr. Stephen Daniels, PhDAudio Mixing by Dr. Paul Sheppard, PhDDigital Marketing by Bryan Jenkins, PhDcTheme music: MegaDisko by Navigator Black & the Indighost

    • 34 min
    Your Brain In THC Vapor Clouds | Brain Waves In Cannabis Use & Psychosis | FPS#10

    Your Brain In THC Vapor Clouds | Brain Waves In Cannabis Use & Psychosis | FPS#10

    Many claims have been made regarding the relation between cannabis use and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. The idea that frequent use of potent cannabis can elicit detrimental effects on cognition, learning & memory, & executive function is generally accepted. But how does THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis, produce changes in brain function that ultimately manifest as symptoms like psychosis that resemble that chief features of schizophrenia? And which brain regions & connections are primarily involved in mediating these effects?In this episode, Bryan Jenkins - Neuroscience PhD Candidate from the University of Guelph - joins us to discuss how a single exposure to vaporized THC can elicit long-term changes in brain waves (oscillatory activity) such as delta, theta, & gamma waves that strikingly resemble the changes observed in patients with schizophrenia. This work has vast implications for our understanding of recreational cannabis use & cannabis use disorder, & how they relate to brain changes that underlie the onset of schizophrenia and related disorders. These results may also inform on public health regarding the increased rates of vaping seen in youth and adolescents in recent years.Manuscript: Published in the Canadian Journal of Addiction: https://journals.lww.com/cja/Abstract/2019/09000/Extended_Attenuation_of_Corticostriatal_Power_and.9.aspxProduced by Roger Hudson, PhDcDirected by Dr. Mina Nashed, PhDVisual Effects by Dr. Stephen Daniels, PhDAudio Mixing by Dr. Paul Sheppard, PhDDigital Marketing by Bryan Jenkins, PhDcTheme music: MegaDisko by Navigator Black & the Indighost

    • 55 min
    How Tiny Touch Tablets For Mice Treat Alzheimer's | Big Data in Neuroscience | FPS#9

    How Tiny Touch Tablets For Mice Treat Alzheimer's | Big Data in Neuroscience | FPS#9

    Neuroscience Databases & mice-sized touchscreen tablets could change how we conduct science. What is big data? And how can it help us?Alzheimer's disease is a devastating, progressive disorder that causes degeneration of neurons in the brain responsible for memory. Alzheimer's disease represents the most common cause of dementia and includes continuous decline in thinking, behavioral and social skills that disrupts a person's ability to function independently. In this episode, Dr. Daniel Palmer - Neuroscience Post Doctoral Fellow from Western University - joins us to discuss how MouseBytes - a repository for neuroscience behavioural data - and various touchscreen operant tasks used with rodent models can be used to enhance drug development and ultimately increase the odds of getting worthy therapeutics to market. This work has vast implications for not only alzheimer's disease, but also Parkinson's Disease and several other psychiatric disorders.Manuscript: MouseBytes, an open-access high-throughput pipeline and database for rodent touchscreen-based cognitive assessment. Published in eLife. Open Access Article: https://elifesciences.org/articles/49630Produced by Roger Hudson, PhDcDirected by Dr. Mina Nashed, PhDVisual Effects by Dr. Stephen Daniels, PhDAudio Mixing by Dr. Paul Sheppard, PhDDigital Marketing by Bryan Jenkins, PhDcTheme music: MegaDisko by Navigator Black & the Indighost

    • 48 min
    How Drugs & Drug-Linked Cues Strengthen Memory. Drug-Linked Cues Evoke Drug-Like Responses. FPS#8

    How Drugs & Drug-Linked Cues Strengthen Memory. Drug-Linked Cues Evoke Drug-Like Responses. FPS#8

    Addictive drugs are said to often worsen memory, and anecdotal reports of drug-users with poor memory are abundant. But what if these reports are wrong? What if drugs of abuse can improve memory under particular circumstances? In this episode, Michael Wolter - Neuroscience PhD Candidate from the University of Guelph - joins us to discuss how Heroin and other drugs of abuse (including cocaine & nicotine) can enhance memory for events immediately preceding drug intake. This work has vast implications for the development of addiction, and for preventing relapse to addictive drugs. In fact, drug-linked experiences stored in the brain's long-term memory centres are believed to be largely responsible for relapse to drug seeking behaviour and drug abuse, even after long periods of successful abstinence.Manuscript: Modulation of object memory consolidation by Heroin and Heroin-conditioned stimuli: Role of opioid and noradrenergic systems. Published in the journal European Neuropsychopharmacology: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32067860 Produced by Roger Hudson, PhDcDirected by Dr. Mina Nashed, PhDVisual Effects by Dr. Stephen Daniels, PhDAudio Mixing by Dr. Paul Sheppard, PhDDigital Marketing by Bryan Jenkins, PhDcTheme music: MegaDisko by Navigator Black & the Indighost

    • 50 min

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