588 episodes

This is a combined feed which includes shows from across the History Hit Network. Including: Dan Snow's History Hit, How and Why History and Chalke Valley History Hit. More shows coming soon. Follow us on Twitter/Facebook: @HistoryHit

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    • Society & Culture

This is a combined feed which includes shows from across the History Hit Network. Including: Dan Snow's History Hit, How and Why History and Chalke Valley History Hit. More shows coming soon. Follow us on Twitter/Facebook: @HistoryHit

    300 years of British Prime Ministers: Part 2

    300 years of British Prime Ministers: Part 2

    Continuing our series looking at British Prime Ministers this episode tackles the period following the Battle of Waterloo all the way up to Winston Churchill. The brilliant Robert Saunders joins us to guide us through the nineteenth century and to discuss some of the most remarkable parliamentarians in history including Peel, Gladstone and Lloyd George. Robert is a Reader in Modern British History at Queen Mary University of London. He specialises in modern British history, from the early 19th century to the present, focusing particularly on political history and the history of ideas. 


    Listen to 300 years of British Prime Ministers: Part 1
     
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    • 56 min
    Prince Philip

    Prince Philip

    Abandoned by his parents, exiled from his home, a veteran of Second World War battles, an author, the founder of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), this is the story of Prince Philip as you have never heard it before.


    He was the longest-serving consort to a reigning British Monarch in history and the oldest-ever male member of the British Royal Family. Born in Corfu, Greece, in 1921 his family escaped a revolution soon after his birth eventually settling in Paris. He was educated in Scotland and after school went on to join the Royal Navy where he served with distinction on British warships during World War Two. He married Princess Elizabeth in 1947 and became a royal consort in 1952 after Elizabeth Ascended to the throne. As consort, he completed over 22,000 solo royal engagements and thousands more alongside Queen Elizabeth for whom he provided unshakeable support. He was a keen sportsman, helped to found the Worldwide Fund for Wildlife, was a patron of many charities and a sponsor of British Engineers and designers. Prince Philip was sometimes portrayed as insensitive and cold and he became known for his sometimes bizarre quips, but what was the real man like? 


    We talk to one of Britain’s best-known broadcasters, Gyles Brandreth, a personal friend of Prince Philip, and a leading historian of the royal family to mark the long life and career of the Queen’s husband. We'll also hear from renowned historian Sally Beddell Smith, author of bestselling biographies of Queen Elizabeth II.
     
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    • 31 min
    The Xiongnu: History's First Nomadic Empire?

    The Xiongnu: History's First Nomadic Empire?

    Between the 3rd century BC and the 1st century AD, the Xiongnu inhabited the area surrounding Mongolia. They influenced the later Hun Empire, and had connections with Ancient China and Persia, but what do we know about them? Bryan Miller has been investigating the society, hierarchy and expansion of the Xiongnu, and in this episode from our sibling podcast The Ancients he shares his findings from the archaeology and historical documents with Tristan. You can listen to the full episode here.
     
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    • 36 min
    What Britain Did to Nigeria

    What Britain Did to Nigeria

    When we think of the British Empire we often think of India, Pakistan, Singapore, Burma or perhaps South Africa but an often underrepresented part of the colonial picture is that of west Africa and specifically Nigeria. Now the most populous country in Africa Nigeria was created out of a diverse set of peoples and territories to suit the needs of the colonial administration. Max Siollun, author of What Britain Did to Nigeria: A Short History of Conquest and Rule, joins Dan to discuss the history of the British colonial project in Nigeria. Many of the themes will be familiar with the exploitation of resources, colonial violence and racism. They also explore how the ripples of the colonial rule continue to be felt in Nigeria shaping its society and politics to this day.
     
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    • 27 min
    Catherine the Great

    Catherine the Great

    Catherine the Great came from minor German nobility to become Empress of Russia and one of the most extraordinary women of the eighteenth century. Dan is joined today on the podcast by Hilda Hoogenboom author of Noble Sentiments and the Rise of Russian Novels. Hilda is a literary historian who has delved deep into the archive material about Catherine, much of it written by Catherine herself, which details her thoughts about constitutions and how governments should be run. Hilda also helps bust some of the myths around Catherine's life and reign, in particular, the misogynistic rumours about her sex life which have persisted long after the end of her reign.
     
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    • 33 min
    30 Years since the Kurdish Uprising

    30 Years since the Kurdish Uprising

    In the aftermath of the First Gulf War, groups rose up against Saddam Hussein's regime in a bid to win independence from Baghdad with devastating results for those involved and in particular for the Kurds of Northern Iraq. The Iraqi army responded with deadly force leading to the displacement of millions and the creation of an enormous refugee crisis in Northern Iraq. By April of 1991 and led by the British government a coalition had been put together and launched Operation Haven. This involved coalition forces entering Northern Iraq and creating a safe zone that would allow Kurdish refugees to return home. In this episode, Dan is joined by General Andy Salmona who was one of the Royal Marines who spearheaded Operation Haven and protected the refugees from Saddam Hussein's Ba'athist forces. He is also joined by Nawroz is a Kurdish folk singer and former Peshmerga fighter whose singing voice is so powerful that it was considered a weapon of war and made him a wanted man. Nawroz and Andy now work together on projects promoting peace and international fraternity and this podcast was a chance for them to relay their experiences in Iraq 30 years ago and explain why their work together is so important.
     
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    • 27 min

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