150 episodes

Turn off your email alerts and settle into the weekend. We explore today's culture, big ideas, nuanced questions and what it means to live a good life. Join our host Lilah Raptopoulos every Saturday for inspiring conversations, in-depth storytelling, a bit of escapism and a lot of fun. Brought to you by the award-winning Life & Arts journalists at the Financial Times.
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FT Weekend Financial Times

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Turn off your email alerts and settle into the weekend. We explore today's culture, big ideas, nuanced questions and what it means to live a good life. Join our host Lilah Raptopoulos every Saturday for inspiring conversations, in-depth storytelling, a bit of escapism and a lot of fun. Brought to you by the award-winning Life & Arts journalists at the Financial Times.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The story of a stolen cookbook. Plus, Elizabeth Strout

    The story of a stolen cookbook. Plus, Elizabeth Strout

    In the 1930s, Alice Urbach wrote a beloved cookbook in Vienna. But during the Holocaust it was stolen: Aryanized, peppered with Nazi ideology and republished under someone else's name. The publisher refused to change it back for more than 85 years. Alice got her intellectual rights restored by her granddaughter Karina Urbach, a historian, who joins us to tell the story. 
    Afterwards, we bring you a conversation with Elizabeth Strout, Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, from our recent US FT Weekend festival. She’s in conversation with FT Globetrotter editor Rebecca Rose.
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    Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. 
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    Links and mentions from the episode: 
    –FT review of ‘Alice’s Book: How the Nazis stole my Grandmother’s Cookbook’, by Katrina Urbach https://on.ft.com/3z0D8bQ
    –A recent piece by Elizabeth Strout for the FT Weekend Magazine, on Judith Joy Ross’s photography: https://on.ft.com/3JdFF4U 
    –Watch the whole FT Weekend Festival on demand here (paid): https://usftweekendfestival.live.ft.com/page/2064102/program 
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    Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. 
    If you have an iPhone and want to try FT Edit (eight pieces of journalism a day, handpicked by senior editors, for much less than an FT subscription), search ‘FT Edit’ in the App Store.
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    Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco. 


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    • 27 min
    Why US abortion rights are under attack

    Why US abortion rights are under attack

    It’s about to become much harder to find safe abortion care in America, in a country where some states already make it almost impossible. This week, we make sense of what’s happening and how we got here. Lilah speaks with Rhiannon Hamam, a Texas public defender and host of the popular show 5-4 (“a podcast about how much the Supreme Court sucks”) to make sense of Roe vs Wade, the seminal law that is expected to be overturned. Then, we pass the mic to three people providing abortion services in three states that will face some of the biggest changes: Wisconsin, Alabama and Illinois. They tell us what they’re seeing, and how they’re preparing for a post-Roe world.
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    Links and mentions from the episode: 
    – You heard this week from Rhiannon Hamam, co-host of the podcast 5-4. Listen everywhere, or here: https://www.fivefourpod.com. Rhiannon is on Twitter at https://twitter.com/AywaRhiannon 
    – Dr. Kristin Lyerly is an obstetrician and gynaecologist in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. She's on Twitter at https://twitter.com/kristinlyerly?lang=en
    – Robin Marty is author of ‘The New Handbook for a Post-Roe America’ and operation director of the West Alabama Women’s Center in Tuscaloosa. She recently wrote an op-ed for the FT: https://on.ft.com/3wr0HZK. You can find her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/robinmarty 
    – Marie Khan is director of programs for the Midwest Access Coalition, a practical abortion fund. You can learn more about them at https://midwestaccesscoalition.org/ 
    – Key coverage of the war in Ukraine is free to read: https://www.ft.com/freetoread
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    Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. 
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    Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. If you have an iPhone and want to try FT Edit, search ‘FT Edit’ in the app store.
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    Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner.
    Archival clip courtesy of CBS.
    Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com

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    • 31 min
    Behind the Money is back!

    Behind the Money is back!

    Behind the Money is back with all-new episodes! From hostile takeovers to C-suite intrigue, Behind the Money takes you inside the business and financial stories of the moment with reporting from Financial Times journalists around the world. The podcast returns May 25. You can follow the show now!
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    • 1 min
    How Shakespeare gave actor Michael Patrick Thornton his life back

    How Shakespeare gave actor Michael Patrick Thornton his life back

    This weekend, Lilah talks to actor Michael Patrick Thornton, who appears in the buzzy new Broadway production of Macbeth. When Michael was 24, he had a series of spinal cord strokes. Reciting Shakespeare's sonnets taught him how to breathe and speak again, and continue his career. Michael is at present the only actor on Broadway who uses a wheelchair. We ask him about the power of language and his role in the play (which also stars Daniel Craig and Ruth Negga). Then, we learn about Britain's top forensic artist from journalist Will Coldwell, and the techniques she uses to catch criminals — which include a jar of strawberry jam.
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    Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. 
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    Links and mentions from the episode: 
    – Will’s profile of Melissa Dring, ‘To catch a criminal: what a forensic artist knows about the mind’: https://on.ft.com/3rw0lht 
    – Michael Patrick Thornton’s theatre company, The Gift: https://thegifttheatre.org/ 
    – Macbeth – starring Daniel Craig, Ruth Negga and Michael – is on Broadway’s Longacre Theatre until July 10
    – Michael is on Twitter @ThorntonMPT, and Will is on Twitter at @Will_Coldwell
    – Select coverage of the war in Ukraine is free to read at https://www.ft.com/freetoread
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    Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. 
    If you have an iPhone and want to try FT Edit (eight pieces of journalism a day, handpicked by senior editors, for much less than an FT subscription), search ‘FT Edit’ in the App Store.
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    Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco.
    Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com

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    • 32 min
    'Everything Everywhere All at Once' with Daniels

    'Everything Everywhere All at Once' with Daniels

    This week, Lilah interviews Everything Everywhere All at Once directors Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert, also known as Daniels. Their film, starring Michelle Yeoh and Jamie Lee Curtis, has received rave reviews for successfully combining genres from indie comedy to sci-fi to kung fu. Then our colleagues Leo Lewis and Eri Sugiura join us from Tokyo to explain Japan's succession crisis. Small and medium-sized companies employ 80 per cent of people in the country, but many owners’ children do not want to inherit the family business.
     
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    Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. 
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    Links and mentions from the episode: 
    –Everything Everywhere All At Once is out now in the US. It will be released in the UK on Friday 13th May. The trailer is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxN1T1uxQ2g 
    – You can follow Daniels on Twitter @daniels. 
    –Leo and Eri’s FT Magazine piece, ‘The pervasive succession crisis threatening Japan’s economy’: https://www.ft.com/content/dc5c19f7-5f4b-4bf5-809a-f46859fb5c39  
    –Leo Lewis’ piece on Japan’s ageing population and the plunging yen: https://www.ft.com/content/c18281da-3036-4b50-9757-334ad3a82620 
    –Eri Sugiura on Kyoto’s empty house tax, a story she broke in February about how Japan is dealing with a declining population https://www.ft.com/content/9b87824b-f9a2-4098-8f59-345e174ec736 
    – Leo is on Twitter at @Urbandirt, and Eri is at @SugiuraEri. 
    –Select coverage of the war in Ukraine is free to read at https://www.ft.com/freetoread
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    Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast.
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    Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco. 


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    • 31 min
    Morality in the Twitter era. Plus: China’s language revolution

    Morality in the Twitter era. Plus: China’s language revolution

    This weekend, we think about morality in the age of social media. According to writer Dan Brooks, we're great at pointing out where good is missing, but we’ve forgotten how to be good people. Then, Yale professor Jing Tsu tells us the story of how China standardised its complex language of 80,000 characters into something that could fit on a keyboard. It wasn’t easy, but it helped make the country the global digital superpower that it is today.
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    Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. 
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    Links and mentions from the episode: 
    – Dan Brooks’ FT Magazine piece, ‘What we need now that social media has fully weaponized morality’: https://on.ft.com/3LyIE9c 
    –The dreaded tweet that inspired Dan’s piece: https://twitter.com/mimismartypants/status/1498332885362823170 
    –Jing’s book is called Kingdom of Characters. The FT’s review is here: https://on.ft.com/3nJqzey 
    –Jing’s 2020 piece for the FT, ‘Why sci-fi could be the secret weapon in China’s soft-power arsenal’: https://on.ft.com/3y2WbBF 
    –Dan Brooks is on Twitter @dangerbrooks, and Jing Tsu is at @tsu_jing. 
    –Tech Tonic Season 3, about the US/China tech race, is available now. Listen wherever you get your podcasts, or at https://www.ft.com/tech-tonic 
    –Select coverage of the war in Ukraine is free to read at https://www.ft.com/freetoread
    —-------------
    Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast.
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    The first US FT Weekend Festival is on Saturday, May 7 in Washington, DC! To attend virtually or in person, buy tickets at http://ft.weekendfestival.com – use the discount code FTFriends2022 for 50% off.
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    Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Tommy Bazarian. 


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    • 29 min

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