644 episodios

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence from The Economist The Economist

    • Noticias
    • 1.0 • 1 valoración

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Neither borrower nor renter be: America’s coming foreclosures

    Neither borrower nor renter be: America’s coming foreclosures

    America’s pandemic-driven measures granting relief on mortgages and rent arrears will soon expire, and millions of people are in danger of losing their homes. The Netherlands’ history of slavery is often overlooked; a new exhibition goes to great lengths to confront it. And how Marmite’s love-it-or-hate-it reputation represents an unlikely marketing coup.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 22 min
    Good news, ad news: Facebook’s big bucks and bets

    Good news, ad news: Facebook’s big bucks and bets

    The social-media behemoth revealed huge profits and stressed even bigger plans: to become an e-commerce giant and a hub for digital creators, and to pioneer something called the “metaverse”. After a bruising election, Peru has an inexperienced new president; matching policy to his hard-left platform will be a dangerous game. And the publisher trying to bring ethnic diversity to romance novels.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 22 min
    Borderline disorder: the UN’s refugee treaty at 70

    Borderline disorder: the UN’s refugee treaty at 70

    An international convention devised after the second world war is ill-suited to the refugee crises of today—and countries are increasingly unwilling to meet their obligations. Vancouver’s proposed response to a spate of drug overdoses is a sweeping decriminalisation; we ask whether the plan would work. And the bid to save a vanishingly rare “click language” in Africa.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 22 min
    Alight in Tunisia: a democracy in crisis

    Alight in Tunisia: a democracy in crisis

    The president has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. It is clear that the country needed a shake-up in its hidebound politics—but is this the right way? A sprawling trial starting today involving the most senior Catholic-church official ever indicted is sure to cast light on the Vatican’s murky finances. And how climate change is already changing winemaking.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 21 min
    The blonde leading: Britain’s two years under Boris Johnson

    The blonde leading: Britain’s two years under Boris Johnson

    As the country tests a bold reopening strategy in the face of the Delta variant, our political editor charitably characterises the prime minister’s tenure as a mixed bag. Hong Kong’s national-security law has now come for its universities, sending shudders through the territory’s last bastion of pro-democracy fervour. And why the alcohol-free beer industry is fizzing. 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 22 min
    A dangerous games? A muted start to the Olympics

    A dangerous games? A muted start to the Olympics

    Tokyo is under a state of emergency; covid-19 cases are piling up. But for Japan, a super-spreader event is just one of the potential costs of this year’s games. We ask why Britain’s government has essentially given amnesty to those involved in Northern Ireland’s decades of deadly violence. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of an Auschwitz accordionist.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 23 min

Reseñas de clientes

1.0 de 5
1 valoración

1 valoración

Top podcasts en Noticias

Otros usuarios también se han suscrito a

Más de The Economist