241 集

Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

Stephanomics Bloomberg

    • 投資
    • 4.0・2 則評分

Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

    For the Coronavirus Economy, This Time Truly Is Different

    For the Coronavirus Economy, This Time Truly Is Different

    There’s little debate that Covid-19 has crushed economies and triggered government rescue efforts not seen in modern times. On this week’s episode, World Bank Chief Economist Carmen Reinhart and fellow Harvard professor Kenneth Rogoff, authors of “This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly,” discuss what comes next with Bloomberg Economics executive editor Simon Kennedy.
    The depth of the U.S. recession isn’t the only way in which this time is different. While tens of millions are newly unemployed or working fewer hours, new pandemic-adjacent occupations are emerging. Host Stephanie Flanders talks with Bloomberg global business reporter Jeff Green about these new jobs, such as contract tracer and thermal scanner.

    • 27 分鐘
    Rich Nations Face a Post-Covid World Without Cheap Migrant Labor

    Rich Nations Face a Post-Covid World Without Cheap Migrant Labor

    Romanian home-care workers in Italy. Indian construction crews in Dubai. Filipino maids and cooks in Singapore. The world’s wealthy economies depend on a steady flow of cheap labor from lower-income nations. And people in those nations often rely on remittances from family members working abroad.
    Now it seems that the coronavirus pandemic that’s crushing economies all over the world is also upending the global labor market. Workers are heading back to their native countries in large numbers—or stranded far from home without jobs and benefits.
    Host Stephanie Flanders talks with Bloomberg journalists in three regions for insight into how this is playing out: European economy editor Andrew Langley in London, Middle East economic reporter Abeer Abu Omar in Dubai and Asia economics columnist Daniel Moss in Singapore.

    • 25 分鐘
    How the Pandemic Jobs Bust Will Hurt Some More Than Others

    How the Pandemic Jobs Bust Will Hurt Some More Than Others

    Just a few months ago, the economic debate about employment centered on how low the jobless rate could go. Now, with tens of millions out of work across the globe, it's about how bad it can get. On this week's episode, host Stephanie Flanders and economy reporter Katia Dmitrieva discuss how those "last in" to a boom economy are usually the "first out" in a downturn. Focusing on seven case studies, they discuss how minorities, young people and women who benefited from the historic surge in employment will be the ones who suffer most, and for longer. 
    In Europe, the coronavirus continues to hit countries hard, yet many people have actually been able to keep their jobs, with at least 45 million having their wages paid by the state. Flanders also talks with Bloomberg Eurozone Economist Maeva Cousin about the cost of keeping these people paid, and how governments will wean companies off this vital support.

    • 22 分鐘
    Waffle House Signals U.S. Reopening, But It Won’t Be Simple

    Waffle House Signals U.S. Reopening, But It Won’t Be Simple

    The Waffle House chain of U.S. restaurants, with most of its locations in the nation’s south, is famous for staying open during hurricanes and other severe weather. Now it’s facing what could be a tougher challenge: luring customers who are wary of spending time there because of the coronavirus.
    It’s all happening in Georgia, whose Republican governor made waves with his decision to let many businesses and restaurants reopen sooner than most people expected—and earlier than medical experts consider advisable.
    Stephanie Flanders talks with Atlanta-based Bloomberg reporter Michael Sasso about the situation on the ground. We’ll hear excerpts from his interview with a Waffle House spokeswoman, too.
    Flanders also speaks with returning guest Richard Baldwin, an economist at the Graduate Institute in Geneva and co-editor of a new eBook addressing Covid-19 and trade policy. Baldwin discusses how trade restrictions are exacerbating the damage done by the pandemic—such as making it more difficult to get masks.

    • 27 分鐘
    China’s Uneven Reopening Shows Fear Might Hold Back Economies

    China’s Uneven Reopening Shows Fear Might Hold Back Economies

    How do you restart the global economy following a coronavirus-induced lockdown? China is the test case, and getting workers back to work is proving a lot easier than getting them to shop or patronize restaurants. On this week’s episode, Stephanie Flanders talks to Bloomberg Beijing bureau chief Sharon Chen about her recent visit to Wuhan, the starting point of the pandemic, and her subsequent 14-day quarantine when she returned home.
    Flanders also speaks with Bloomberg chief Europe economist Jamie Rush about how lifting restrictions will translate into increased economic output. Then, in an excerpt from a panel discussion, former European Central Bank President Jean-Claude Trichet has some strong words about the Group of 20’s response to the pandemic, along with inflation targeting and a few other topics.

    • 21 分鐘
    The IMF’s Chief Economist on Lessons From the "Great Lockdown"

    The IMF’s Chief Economist on Lessons From the "Great Lockdown"

    Mid-April is when the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank hold their spring meetings, where finance ministers and central bankers gather to exchange ideas on keeping global growth intact. This year, the meetings will be virtual, and the discussions less about growth and more about avoiding an economic abyss.
    Gita Gopinath, in her second year as the IMF’s chief economist, is projecting the worst global downturn since the Great Depression. She talks with Stephanie Flanders about what the international community needs to do now and what lessons policymakers should take away from the Covid-19 pandemic and its fallout. Flanders also speaks with Bloomberg economy reporter Catherine Bosley about why Germany is patting itself on the back for a history of budgetary stinginess.

    • 26 分鐘

用戶評論

4.0 滿分 5 粒星
2 則評分

2 則評分

刘骅新

Promising, but needs polish

I see excellent potential for this podcast, given Bloomberg's market presence and access to experts. I enjoyed the China podcast, but found it distracting when they opened with a chatty byplay regarding the chilly summer weather in San Francisco, especially Tori's valley girl speech pattern. Stick with a professional tone and focus. Looking forward to following this podcast regularly.

關於投資的熱門 Podcast

聽眾還訂閱了

Bloomberg的更多節目