298 episodes

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

LSE: Public lectures and events London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

    The Next Four Years: what should we expect for America?

    The Next Four Years: what should we expect for America?

    Contributor(s): Professor Desmond King, Mark Landler, Professor Paula D. McClain, Professor Theda Skocpol | What will the next administration's international and domestic priorities be? A roundtable discussion with leading experts on American politics.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Desmond King is Andrew W Mellon Professor of American Government and Professorial Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. He specializes in the study of the American state in US executive politics, race and politics in American political development, and the financial bases of US politics. He is a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA), and is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (FAAAS), the Academia Europaea (MAE), the Royal Irish Academy (MRIA), the National Academy of Social Insurance (FNASI) and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS).
    Mark Landler (@MarkLandler) is the London bureau chief of The New York Times. In 27 years at The Times, he has been bureau chief in Hong Kong and Frankfurt, White House correspondent, diplomatic correspondent, European economic correspondent, and a business reporter in New York. He is the author of Alter Egos, a comparative study of the foreign policy of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
    Paula D. McClain is James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Professor of Public Policy and Dean of The Graduate School and Vice Provost for Graduate Education at Duke University. A Howard University Ph.D., her primary research interests are in racial minority group politics, particularly inter-minority political and social competition, and urban politics. Her 1995 book Can We All Get Along?: Racial and Ethnic Minorities in American Politics, co-authored with Joseph Stewart, Jr., won the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America Award for Outstanding Scholarship on the Subject of Intolerance.
    Theda Skocpol is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University. She has authored many books, articles, and reports, won many awards, and been elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. Her ongoing research focuses on U.S. conservatives and the Republican Party, the politics of health care policy, and citizen reactions to the Obama and Trump presidencies.
    Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House.
    More about this event
    The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.

    • 1 hr 28 min
    A Decade of Behavioural Science at LSE: A Fireside chat with Professor Paul Dolan

    A Decade of Behavioural Science at LSE: A Fireside chat with Professor Paul Dolan

    Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Join us for this fireside chat where Paul Dolan will be reflecting on ten years of behavioural science at LSE, discussing biases, narratives, happiness, resilience and more. We will be summarising the learnings from behavioural science in the last 10 years, drawing from research from LSE and beyond. We will also be looking to the future, mapping out the most important and exciting areas of study. Those that join us can expect to laugh, learn and lean into behavioural science.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After.
    Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is an associate professor in behavioural science at LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at LSE and the author of Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Career You Want.
    More about this event
    The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

    • 59 min
    Key Workers and Inequality

    Key Workers and Inequality

    Contributor(s): Kate Bell, Deborah Hargreaves | The vital labour of 'key workers' has been widely lauded during the pandemic. But can the trend of recent decades toward inequalities in earning and status be reversed?
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Kate Bell (@kategobell) is the Head of the Rights, International, Social and Economics department at the TUC.
    Deborah Hargreaves (@deborahharg) is the Chair of the London Child Poverty Alliance and a founder and director of the High Pay Centre, an independent think-tank that monitors executive pay. She is a former business editor of the Guardian and previously worked at the Financial Times. She is the author of Are Chief Executives Overpaid?
    Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme.
    More about this event
    The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.

    • 1 hr 20 min
    What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

    What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

    Contributor(s): Professor Laura Bear, Nikita Simpson, Professor Joan Roses, Dr Adam Oliver, Dr Clare Wenham, Professor Patrick Wallis | In this month’s episode of the LSE IQ podcast we ask, ‘What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?’.
    On the 23rd March 2020 Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the country’s first national lockdown. In the months since, there has been a seismic shift in all our lives. As we embark on 2021 and, hopefully, the latter stages of the pandemic, now is an apt moment to reflect on how we’ve got to where we are. While the scientific community has taken centre stage in the fight to overcome the virus, how have social scientists helped us navigate – and evaluate –the UK’s response?
     
    In this episode we talk to anthropologists Professor Laura Bear and Nikita Simpson, Economic historians Professor Patrick Wallis and Professor Joan Roses, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy Dr Clare Wenham and behavioural economist Dr Adam Oliver.
     
     
    Research
     
    ’A good death’ during the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK: a report on key findings and recommendations, by the COVID and Care Research Group
    A Right to Care: The Social Foundations of Recovery from COVID-19, by the COVID and Care Research Group
    The Redistributive Effects of Pandemics: Evidence of the Spanish Flu. By Sergi Basco, Jordi Domenech, and Johanne Rohses
    Separating behavioural science from the herd by Adam Oliver
    Reciprocity and the art of behavioural public policy by Adam Oliver
    What is the future of UK leadership in global health security post Covid-19? By Clare Wenham
    A Dreadful Heritage: Interpreting Epidemic Disease at Eyam, 1666-2000, by Patrick Wallis
    Eyam revisited: lessons from a plague village, by Patrick Wallis
     
    Contributors
     
    Professor Laura Bear
    Nikita Simpson
    Professor Joan Roses
    Dr Adam Oliver
    Dr Clare Wenham
    Professor Patrick Wallis

    • 44 min
    The 'True' Brexit: where are we now?

    The 'True' Brexit: where are we now?

    Contributor(s): Professor Tony Travers, Jill Rutter, Vicky Pryce, Professor Katy Hayward |
    In the aftermath of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the negotiations for the UK’s future relationship with the EU look even more challenging. Now that the UK is finishing its transition to Brexit, do we now know what it means? We explore the realities of Brexit for government, the economy, and our politics and look ahead to the policy choices we face. What are the unresolved questions for the UK? Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law to assess where we might be heading.
    Katy Hayward (@hayward_katy) is Professor of Political Sociology in Queen’s University Belfast and a Senior Fellow at ‘The UK in a Changing Europe’ think-tank, where she leads a project on The future and status of Northern Ireland.
    Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor at the Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service.
    Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is Senior Research Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe.
    Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE.
    Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory.
    This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy.
    The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
    The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSEBrexit #LSECOVID19

    • 1 hr 23 min
    Report of the UK Wealth Tax Commission

    Report of the UK Wealth Tax Commission

    Contributor(s): Dr Andy Summers, Emma Chamberlain, Dr Arun Advani |
    The unprecedented public spending required to tackle COVID-19 has been followed by debates about how to rebuild public finances and tackle inequalities exposed by the crisis. This event launches the final report of a major new project investigating the desirability and feasibility of a ‘wealth tax’ for the UK. Building on contributions by a network of world-leading experts on tax policy, the report will make recommendations to government on how to tax wealth more effectively.
    Arun Advani (@arunadvaniecon) is Assistant Professor of Economics and Impact Director of the CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick. He is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, and a Visiting Fellow at the LSE International Inequalities Institute.
    Emma Chamberlain is a barrister at Pump Court Tax Chambers and Visiting Professor in Practice at the LSE International Inequalities Institute. She is also a Visiting Professor at University of Oxford, where she teaches Taxation of Global Wealth.
    Andy Summers (@summers_ad) is Associate Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE and an Associate Member of the LSE International Inequalities Institute. He is also a Research Associate at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick.
    Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science in the Department of Economics at LSE. He was a member of the IFS’s Mirrlees Review panel, and is currently a Commissioner of the National Infrastructure Commission.
    The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
    The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world’s best law schools. The department ranked first for research outputs in the UK's most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) and was in the top 5 law departments overall in the 2018 Complete University Guide. Our staff play a major role in helping to shape policy debates, and in the education of current and future lawyers and legal scholars from around the world.
    This research was made possible through funding by the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity (AFSEE) programme's Covid-19 Rapid Response fund, UKRI/ESRC (Grant number - ES/V012657/1) – Covid-19 Rapid Response and CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

    • 1 hr 28 min

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