111 episodes

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

Overheard at National Geographic National Geographic

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 17 Ratings

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

    Frank Drake’s Cosmic Road Map

    Frank Drake’s Cosmic Road Map

    Are we alone in the universe? It’s a question we’ve been asking for millennia. Now we’re on the cusp of learning the answer. Frank Drake—one of the most vocal (and brilliant) askers—has spent the past six decades inspiring others to join him in this quest. Now, a new generation of scientists is carrying his work forward. They’re finally being taken seriously, and they’re about to change the way we think about our place in the cosmos.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.

    Want more?
    Space isn’t the only place to explore when scientists are looking for alien life; it’s also important to go underground—here on Earth. Find out why on another episode of Overheard.
    Breakthrough Listen is reaching beyond our galaxy to determine whether or not there is life in space. The project is audacious—and worth following closely.
    Frank Drake and Carl Sagan had a legendary friendship and professional relationship. One of their many projects was to create another kind of cosmic road map meant to show aliens how to find us. 

    Also explore:
    In 1977, NASA sent a set of Golden Records to space attached to two Voyager spacecraft. Carl Sagan, Frank Drake, and a team of inspired scientists decided what they should contain. Here’s the music that’s flying outside of our solar system right now.
    Thanks to another kind of map, it’s possible to see just how far those radio signals have traveled since leaving our planet over a hundred years ago. So far, they’ve traveled about 200 light-years—and no one has heard them yet.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 37 min
    Playback: Amelia Earhart Part II: The Lady’s Legacy

    Playback: Amelia Earhart Part II: The Lady’s Legacy

    Amelia Earhart’s statue was recently unveiled at the U.S. Capitol, and for good reason: Her adventurous spirit had implications for women around the country. Earhart went well beyond setting records as a pilot--her true end game was equality for women, a rarely explored side of her life story that goes well beyond the mystery of her disappearance. In today's Playback, we hit our archives and learn about a different Amelia.
    For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard.
    This summer, adventure is never far away with a free one-month trial subscription to Nat Geo Digital. For starters, there’s full access to our online stories, plus every Nat Geo issue ever published in our archives! There’s a whole lot more for subscribers, and you can check it all out–for free–at natgeo.com/exploremore.
    Want more?
    Read “My Flight from Hawaii,” the 1935 article Earhart wrote for National Geographic about her voyage from Hawaii to California. 
    Peruse the Amelia Earhart archive at Purdue University, which is filled with memorabilia and images from Earhart’s life, including her inimitable sense of fashion and some revolutionary luggage.
    Take a look through Earhart’s childhood home in Atchison, Kansas. It’s now the Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum. 
    And click here to learn more about the Amelia Earhart statue at the U.S. Capitol and the new Amelia Earhart Hangar Museum being built in Atchison.

    Also explore:
    Check out Earhart’s cherry red Lockheed Vega 5B, used to fly across the Atlantic solo in 1932. It’s on display at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, in Washington, D.C.
    Learn about the Ninety-Nines, an organization founded in 1929 to promote advancement for women in aviation. Earhart was the Ninety-Nines’ first president. Today its membership is composed of thousands of female pilots from around the world.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 38 min
    Harnessing the Power of Yellowstone’s Supervolcano

    Harnessing the Power of Yellowstone’s Supervolcano

    If a major eruption ever were to occur at Yellowstone’s “supervolcano,” the event could destroy huge swaths of North America. But in recent years, some scientists have proposed that the amazing power locked beneath the caldera could be harnessed to generate renewable geothermal energy. National Geographic writer Maya Wei-Haas examines the risks of a supervolcanic eruption at Yellowstone and what it would take to use it as a power source.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.

    Want more? 
    Check out Maya Wei-Haas’ article about how bacteria discovered in Yellowstone led to the development of PCR tests used to detect Covid-19, and her article about the eruption of Cumbre Vieja on La Palma. 
    See how the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory is monitoring the region on their website. 
    Listen to more of Paolo Dell'aversana’s geomusic on his YouTube page.

    Also explore:
    Find out more about the geothermal facilities mentioned in this episode on their websites:

    Cornell University Borehole Observatory

    The Geysers in California 

    Krafla Magma Testbed


    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 37 min
    Stonehenge Has a Traffic Problem

    Stonehenge Has a Traffic Problem

    The 4,500-year-old Stonehenge attracts hordes of tourists—and massive congestion. To alleviate traffic, the British government is considering a plan to build a tunnel near the monument, but historians and modern Druids alike are concerned that the development could damage artifacts critical to understanding the ancient stone circle.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.

    Want more?
    Did you know that some pieces of Stonehenge may have come from even older artifacts? Take a look at our article on the subject.

    Also explore
    Now that you’ve heard about Alice Zoo’s and Reuben Wu’s photography, want to see it for yourself? Check out Alicezoo.com and ReubenWu.com.

    For subscribers
    We only scraped the surface when it comes to Stonehenge. Roff Smith wrote a piece for the August issue of the magazine that digs into the ancient past of the site as well as its modern issues, and you can read more about how Reuben captured the spirit of the world heritage site using a drone. Also, through this interactive graphic, visit Stonehenge in 2500 B.C. to learn more about how and why the mysterious circle was built.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 29 min
    Do Shark Stories Help Sharks?

    Do Shark Stories Help Sharks?

    Our obsession with sharks has generated folklore around the world for thousands of years. But a series of attacks at the Jersey shore in 1916 would forever change the way we tell stories about sharks. We trace how attitudes toward sharks shifted in the past century—from stoking our fears to emboldening some to ride on their backs—which directly affects the future of one of the most evolved species on the planet.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.

    Want More? 
    SharkFest returns! For more great stories on sharks and for our programming schedule, check out natgeo.com/sharkfest.
    Read about camo sharks that change the color of their skin, scientists who are using drones to expand our understanding of shark behavior, and discoveries on the shark superpowers of speed and bite force.

    Also explore: 
    The attacks on the Jersey Shore in 1916 were captured in the newspapers at the time; the fear generated was instantaneous. Read more about that here.
    “Sharkzilla” was not a thing. But that didn’t stop many people from believing in it. What was the real story behind the Carcharocles megalodon? Read about it here.

    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 37 min
    How Black Climbers Are Closing the Adventure Gap

    How Black Climbers Are Closing the Adventure Gap

    Ever since Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit of Mount Everest, there has been a long list of firsts: the first ascent without supplemental oxygen, the first in winter, and the first full ski descent, to name a few. The first Black climber reached the roof of the world in 2003. But until this year, no team of Black climbers had done it. Meet one of the climbers in the Full Circle Everest expedition, and learn why he hopes this historic accomplishment shows that Black people belong in outdoor recreation too.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard

    Want more?
    Read more about Full Circle Everest, the revolutionary team that made history on the world’s highest peak. And go deeper with James’s podcast episode featuring an interview with Demond “Dom” Mullins, as well as James’s website The Joy Trip Project and his book The Adventure Gap.
    Black Americans make up just two percent of National Park visitors, according to a 2018 report. Read about how the National Park Service is trying to live up to its credo to provide “Benefit and Enjoyment of the People”—all people.
    Income disparities and an inability to take time off work can restrict people of color from outdoor recreation. Follow a group of people strapping on crampons and climbing frozen waterfalls for the first time.   

    Also explore:
    Check out other groups—like Outdoor Afro and Melanin Base Camp—dedicated to diversifying the outdoors.
    See Everest from above. Panoramic drone photography shows what it’s like to stand on the roof of the world.
    In 2021, researchers announced a new height for Mount Everest: 29,031.69 feet above sea level. Learn how they arrived at such a precise measurement, as well as the biting-cold, middle-of-the-night ascent that made it possible.
    Everest may be the world’s tallest mountain, but K2 is often called the most dangerous. In another Overheard episode, we chronicle the all-Nepali team that climbed K2 in winter, something that had never been done before.  
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

boxuongkho ,

Ok

Good

Top Podcasts In Science

QUBIT.HU
Julia Fél
Pogi
Pulicorn Podcast
Lawrence M. Krauss
Tebe Podcast

You Might Also Like

KUOW News and Information
Smithsonian Institution
National Geographic
New Hampshire Public Radio
Witness Docs & Atlas Obscura
National Geographic

More by National Geographic