130 episodes

A lifestyle podcast for women who want tidiness without trash.



Although minimalism has experienced a rebirth in recent years, the "less is more" movement has been around for centuries. Yet today's minimalist influencers have resurrected minimalism with a decidedly consumerist spin, as modern minimalism is nearly synonymous with decluttering. While there's a lot of chatter about tidying, it's radio silence and crickets when it comes to sustainability. 



The result? Aspiring minimalists find themselves on an endless hamster wheel of buying, decluttering, buying more, and purging again. Overemphasizing decluttering and underemphasizing the reasons why we overbuy in the first place is thoroughly inconsistent with slow living as a movement; consumption without intention is terrible for the planet, too. 



Your host, Stephanie Seferian, is a stay-at-home/podcast-from-home mom and author who believes that minimalism and eco-friendliness are intrinsically intertwined. She's here to explore the topics of conscious consumerism, sustainability, and environmentally-friendly parenting practices with like-minded women; she's here, too, to show you how to curate eco-friendly, decluttered homes (without the extra work). 

The Sustainable Minimalists Podcast Stephanie Seferian

    • Leisure

A lifestyle podcast for women who want tidiness without trash.



Although minimalism has experienced a rebirth in recent years, the "less is more" movement has been around for centuries. Yet today's minimalist influencers have resurrected minimalism with a decidedly consumerist spin, as modern minimalism is nearly synonymous with decluttering. While there's a lot of chatter about tidying, it's radio silence and crickets when it comes to sustainability. 



The result? Aspiring minimalists find themselves on an endless hamster wheel of buying, decluttering, buying more, and purging again. Overemphasizing decluttering and underemphasizing the reasons why we overbuy in the first place is thoroughly inconsistent with slow living as a movement; consumption without intention is terrible for the planet, too. 



Your host, Stephanie Seferian, is a stay-at-home/podcast-from-home mom and author who believes that minimalism and eco-friendliness are intrinsically intertwined. She's here to explore the topics of conscious consumerism, sustainability, and environmentally-friendly parenting practices with like-minded women; she's here, too, to show you how to curate eco-friendly, decluttered homes (without the extra work). 

    5 Tips For An Organized Home (With Kids!)

    5 Tips For An Organized Home (With Kids!)

    Tips for an organized home with kids

     

    Staying on top of tidiness can be stress-inducing, time-sucking, and never-ending. If it seems as though your home never looks or feels the way you want it, know that maintaining an organized space with kids is hard work, but it’s possible.

    This week, I speak with professional organizer Elise Hay. Elise believes there’s only one way to have a tidy home with children, and that’s to have the support of each and every family member. Elise is on the show to divulge the strategies she uses in her own home to create an organized sanctuary with children in tow.

    No children? No problem: Elise’s ideas work for kid-less listeners, too.

    Here’s a preview of this week’s episode:

    [5:15] The top two tips for an organized home with kids

    [9:15] Tidying 101: Where to start and what to have on-hand

    [12:00] How and why to use drop baskets

    [16:45] Ways to both engage kids in the organizing process and get them excited about caring for their shared home (plus: why we shouldn’t clean up after our children)

    [21:30] The genius behind Not Done Spaces

    [26:30] Should kids have toys in their bedrooms? Elise weighs in

     

    Resources mentioned in the episode:



    * Click here to enter to win a set of Swedish dishcloths from Cleaner Cloths! Giveaway ends on 5/10.



     

     

    * A big thank you to Cleaner Cloths for sponsoring this week’s episode! 

    * Want more episodes like this one? Check out #152: How To Organize For Your Personality.

    * Like the show? Leave it a quick review!  On the Apple Podcasts app, hit the Library tab, scroll allll the way to the bottom past all prior episodes, then click on the stars to leave a review. (Thank you!)

    * Join our (free!) community here.

    * Find your tribe. Sustainable Minimalists are on Facebook, Instagram + Pinterest.

     

     



     

    Pop Culture and the Environmental Movement Today

    Pop Culture and the Environmental Movement Today

    Pop Culture and the Environmental Movement Today

     

    In recent years, pop culture has raised important questions about the environmental movement today, and people are listening. Because while it can be easy to dissociate from media coverage surrounding global warming, climate change, and environmental racism, it’s much harder to do so when pop culture pushes the narrative.

    The relationship between popular culture and popular opinion is circular, and so a great way to jumpstart conversations with children and other loved ones is to do so through a television show, a book, a movie, or a song that both hits the issue head-on and pulls at the heartstrings.

    Today I’m speaking with author Jessica Harris. Jessica felt prompted to write a children’s book about plastic pollution after realizing that The Great Pacific Garbage Patch isn’t common knowledge: If adults don’t know about plastic’s problems, how can they teach their kids? Jessica and I discuss the reasons why pop culture—not media coverage!—may be the best means by which to both broaden and diversify the environmental movement today; we suggest solutions for engaging older children in the conversation, too.

     

    Here’s a preview of this week’s episode:

    [9:30] Why, exactly, pop culture is really darn important for the environmental movement today

    [12:30] How to talk to older kids about global warming and climate change: What research says

    [18:15] Why and how to  focus on solutions instead of ruminating on the magnitude of the problem

    [25:00] The 7 areas that have made our world and shaped our future, plus sustainability concerns associated with cheap goods

    [26:00] The promises associated with a circular economy (as opposed to a linear one)

     

    Resources mentioned in the episode:



    * Enter to win a signed copy of Bernie’s Escape from Ong Island here!

    * Extension activities to accompany Bernies Escape From Ong Island

    * A big thank you to Cleaner Cloths for sponsoring this week’s episode!

    * Harris Energy Solutions on Instagram



     



    Other pop culture resources:

    Children’s Books:



    * The problems with plastic: Bernie’s Escape from Ong Island

    * A gentle introduction to climate change: The Lonely Polar Bear by Khoa Le

    * Jane Goodall’s life and advocacy: The Watcher by Jane Goodall

    * How to help endangered species: Don’t Let Them Disappear by Chelsea Clinton

    * The importance of bees: Bee & Me by Alison Jay

    * Why we need trees: The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry 

    * Planting and growing: Miss Maple’s Seeds by Eliza Wheeler

    * Finding eco-friendly solutions: Kate, Who Tamed The Wind by Liz Garton Scanlon and Lee White ...

    Minimalist Beauty For The Conscious Consumer

    Minimalist Beauty For The Conscious Consumer

    Minimalist beauty for the conscious consumer

     

    Toner, exfoliant, emulsion, eye cream, and that’s all before breakfast: The average woman uses 12 beauty products each and every day. But are these products actually necessary? What are the benefits to a minimalist beauty routine, and how do you start simplifying your existing one?

    On today’s show we are applying the tenets of sustainable minimalism to our skincare routines by minimizing the excess, simplifying the process, and replacing what’s essential with eco-conscious and non-toxic products. 

    Today I’m speaking with Jeremy Coles and Emma de Szoeke, the husband and wife team behind Croon, a toxin-free, closed-loop facial cleanser. Jeremy and Emma outline the problems they see within the skincare industry as well as potential solutions for those of us who are ready to look at the products in our bathrooms with critical eyes. 

     

    Here’s a preview of the episode:

    [9:50]: What the average listener likely doesn’t know about his/her beauty products

    [16:15]: How the concept of body burden relates to the contents of our medicine cabinets 

    [19:45]:  How to simplify your skincare routine in 4 steps

     

    Resources mentioned in this week’s episode:



    * Try Croon for FREE and join the #NoSoapChallenge here!

    * Thank you to Outrage + Optimism for sponsoring this episode! Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts for new episodes every Thursday.



     

     

    * Want more shows like this one? Check out #009: How to Create a Sustainable Minimalists’ Bathroom.

    * Join our (free!) community here.

    * Find your tribe. Sustainable Minimalists are on Facebook, Instagram + Pinterest.

     



     



     

    Digital Minimalism in 2021

    Digital Minimalism in 2021

    Digital Minimalism in 2021

     

    It isn’t hyperbole: Technology is in many ways taking over our daily lives. Research has found that children spend 1200 hours per year on technological devices. And adults? We waste approximately 6200 hours a year—or up to a staggering equivalent of 44 years of our lives—staring at screens. In this era of technological-everything, is digital minimalism even possible?

    On today’s show I speak with Bill Brady, CEO of Troomi. As a father of five, Bill offers up his best tips for creating a culture within our homes that prioritize in-person time as opposed to screen time; he suggests action steps for adults looking to achieve digital minimalism, too.

     

    Here’s a preview of this week’s episode:

    [4:15] Beyond cyberbullying: The wide-ranging effects of technology on kids

    [8:30] 3 House Rules that prioritize real-life relationships over virtual ones

    [13:30] The importance of technological time-outs for working professionals

    [20:15] How to know when your child is ready for a cell phone

     

    Resources mentioned in the episode:



    * Upchoose.com



     

    * This episode is sponsored by Cleaner Cloths. It’s also sponsored by Outrage + Optimism.

    * Want more shows like this one? Check out #0134: Raising Good Humans With Minimalist Parenting Guidance.

    * Like the show? Help it grow by leaving a quick review! On the Apple Podcasts app, hit the Library tab, scroll allll the way to the bottom past all prior episodes, then click on the stars to leave a review. (Thank you!)

    * Join our (free!) community here.

    * Find your tribe. Sustainable Minimalists are on Facebook, Instagram + Pinterest.

     

     



     



     

    Becoming A Zero Waste Chef

    Becoming A Zero Waste Chef

    Becoming a Zero Waste Chef

     

    The daily habits zero waste chefs rely on to reduce food and packaging waste can seem daunting to the rest of us, to say the least. But in the era of meal delivery kits and takeout culture, cooking from scratch and ensuring nothing gets wasted may indeed be self-sufficient skills that consumers are in danger of losing.

    On today’s episode, Anne-Marie Bonneau, better known as The Zero Waste Chef, and I discuss cooking as a both an art form and a skill our grandparents had down to a science. Anne-Marie offers her best tips from her new book on how you and I can create less waste without overwhelm, too.

    Here’s a preview of today’s episode:

    [4:30] Is zero-waste in 2021 even possible?

    [7:15] Anne-Marie’s motivation for listeners who don’t like cooking

    [10:00]  The what, how, and why behind freestyle cooking

    [12:30] A discussion of fermentation (plus Anne-Marie’s secret for perfect sourdough)

    [24:00] The convenience factor: Why so many of us buy instead of make despite excess cost and waste

    [24:50] 5 reasons why knowing how to cook is really darn important

     

     

    Resources mentioned:

    Anne-Marie’s new book

     

    * This episode is sponsored by Outrage + Optimism. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts for new episodes every Thursday.

    * Want more episodes like this one? Check out #093: How (Exactly) To Cook Zero Waste Meals.

    * Join our (free!) community here.

    * Find your tribe. Sustainable Minimalists are on Facebook, Instagram + Pinterest.

     



     



     

    Why 1000 Hours Outside?

    Why 1000 Hours Outside?

    The benefits of 1000 hours outside

     

    Most of us understand intuitively that spending time outdoors – 1000 hours outside, in fact! –  is important. But what does science say about the role of nature in our lives? How can we make the outdoors a staple of our children’s childhoods without tears?

    The 1000 Hours Outside campaign seeks to match nature time with screen time, and that’s because kids spend approximately 1200 hours per year in front of electronic devices. I’ve dedicated my family to the lofty goal of spending 1000 hours outside this year in ways that are structured, completely unstructured, and everything in between. (Full disclosure: I’m a bit behind!)

    Today I speak with Molly Ridic and Austin Rempel. Molly is a representative for b4 Adventure; Austin is a Forest Restoration Manager for American Forests. Together b4 and American Forests have teamed up to plant thousands of trees across North America.

    Molly and Austin are on the show to outline research-backed benefits of extended playtime outdoors for adults, children and even nature; they offer practical tips, too, to help you and me prioritize nature play in all kinds of weather.

     

    Here’s a preview of this week’s episode:

    [6:15] Why is it important to spend time outdoors? Here’s what the research says

    [10:30] The connection between fostering nature love and creating environmental stewards, plus an exploration on the benefits of trees

    [17:30] Why adventure is an important component of nature love

    [21:30] Pragmatic motivation for listeners with obstacles, including living in an urban environment, experiencing challenging weather, and more

     

    Resources mentioned in this week’s episode:



    * The 1000 Hours Outside Campaign

    * The Slackers Play to Plant Partnership



     

    * This episode is sponsored by Outrage + Optimism. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts for new episodes every Thursday.

    * Want more episodes like this one? Check out #099: How to Raise Eco-Conscious Kids.

     



     

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