18 episodes

University of California faculty and researchers explore medical imaging techniques, such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and how they are used.

Radiology (Audio) UCTV

    • Science

University of California faculty and researchers explore medical imaging techniques, such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and how they are used.

    If Researchers Find a Tumor Should They Tell You? - Exploring Ethics

    If Researchers Find a Tumor Should They Tell You? - Exploring Ethics

    Research imaging studies, including MRI and CT scans, may provide different information than the imaging performed for clinical care. For instance, a liver MRI using research sequences could be more sensitive at detecting tumors than a standard study. As a result, a patient might no longer qualify for surgery according to the research study. However, information derived from research sequences may not be clinically accurate. Hence the need to conduct a thorough investigation and compare against a gold standard (e.g. a surgical result). Kathryn Fowler, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology at UC San Diego discuses the ethics of patients and physicians being made aware of research results if they are not verifiably accurate. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Show ID: 34997]

    • 58 min
    Ultrasounds During Pregnancy

    Ultrasounds During Pregnancy

    Ultrasounds are one of the many tools available to help you have a healthy pregnancy. They can be used to monitor fetal growth, estimate risks for genetic disorders, discover the gender of your baby, and much more. Dr. Julia Cormano discusses the different types of ultrasounds that may be done during your pregnancy and how this technology can provide a unique view of your baby's development. Series: "Motherhood Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 34773]

    • 4 min
    How is Your Heart Doing? Just Look! - Exploring Ethics

    How is Your Heart Doing? Just Look! - Exploring Ethics

    Recent developments in medical imaging, especially the modern CT scanner, now make it possible to make extremely accurate pictures of the human heart in less than one heartbeat. This non-invasive, non-expensive imaging method can produce an accurate picture of cardiovascular health. Heart disease kills more people each year than any other disease. We are presented with an interesting problem for medicine: should we all look to see how our own heart is doing? Is it beneficial to us? Can we afford to do this? Elliot McVeigh, PhD, Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego, investigates these questions and more. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 33717]

    • 56 min
    Human Images from World’s First Total-Body PET Scanner Unveiled

    Human Images from World’s First Total-Body PET Scanner Unveiled

    EXPLORER, the world’s first medical imaging scanner from UC Davis that can capture a 3D picture of the whole human body at once, has produced its first scans. The developers expect the technology will have countless applications, from improving diagnostics to tracking disease progression to researching new drug therapies. Here the EXPLORER image shows glucose metabolism throughout the entire human body. This is the first time a medical imaging scanner has been able to capture a 3-D image of the entire human body simultaneously. Series: "UCTV Prime" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 34584]

    • 1 min
    Imaging Basics-CT MRI SPECT/PET - 2019 Bay Area Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Conference

    Imaging Basics-CT MRI SPECT/PET - 2019 Bay Area Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Conference

    Thomas Hope, MD. Associate Professor, Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, UCSF. Series: "Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Conference - UCSF" [Health and Medicine] [Education] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 34550]

    • 19 min
    PRRT-Where Are We Now and What’s on the Horizon? - 2019 Bay Area Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Conference

    PRRT-Where Are We Now and What’s on the Horizon? - 2019 Bay Area Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Conference

    Thomas Hope, MD. Associate Professor, Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, UCSF. Series: "Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Conference - UCSF" [Health and Medicine] [Education] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 34551]

    • 22 min

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