49 episodes

The War on Cars is a podcast about car culture, mobility and the future of cities. We bring you news, commentary and stories about the worldwide battle to undo a century's worth of damage wrought by the automobile. The War on Cars is waged by three leading voices of the livable streets movement, Doug Gordon, Sarah Goodyear and Aaron Naparstek. Liberate your city. Enlist today in The War on Cars.

The War on Cars Proving Ground Media

    • Society & Culture

The War on Cars is a podcast about car culture, mobility and the future of cities. We bring you news, commentary and stories about the worldwide battle to undo a century's worth of damage wrought by the automobile. The War on Cars is waged by three leading voices of the livable streets movement, Doug Gordon, Sarah Goodyear and Aaron Naparstek. Liberate your city. Enlist today in The War on Cars.

    Vehicles as Weapons

    Vehicles as Weapons

    Using a vehicle as an instrument of terror is nothing new. Over the last decade, extremists proclaiming affiliation with ISIS and other terrorist groups have used trucks and cars to murder pedestrians in London, Barcelona, Nice, Berlin, New York...the list goes on. Recently, however, the United States has seen a new and frightening development with vehicular assaults. These attacks are not random. The targets are protesters using highways and streets to exercise their First Amendment rights, to demand justice, and to call for the reform of policing and other systemically racist institutions. Some of the attacks have been carried out by people affiliated with right-wing hate groups, some by people with no known affiliation, and still others have involved the police themselves. In this episode, Sarah talks with Ari Weil, a University of Chicago Ph.D. student researching vehicular attacks, about this terrifying trend. We also hear from Robert Foster, who was at a protest in Austin, Texas, where a confrontation between a marcher and a driver turned fatal.
    Support The War on Cars on Patreon.
    Rate and review the podcast on iTunes.
    Buy a War on Cars t-shirt at Cotton Bureau.
    Purchase books by authors featured on The War on Cars via Bookshop.org.
    SHOW NOTES: 
    Follow Ari on Twitter @AriWeil
    Read more about Ari Weil’s research into right-wing vehicular attacks. (NBC News) 
    Ari Weil’s interview with Vox.com about the “far right ecosystem online” that’s encouraging vehicular attacks and congratulating the people who carry them out. 
    Vehicular Attacks Rise as Extremists Target Protestors. (NPR)
    Police officers in SUVs rammed protestors and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio initially defended the cops. (New York Times)
    The states that introduced bills in 2017 to protect drivers who run over protestors. (CNN)
    This episode was produced by Sarah Goodyear and edited by Ali Lemer. Our music is by Nathaniel Goodyear. Our logo is by Dani Finkel of Crucial D Design.
    Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1. 
    Questions, comments or suggestions? Email us: thewaroncars@gmail.com
    TheWarOnCars.org

    • 29 min
    Crash Course with Woodrow Phoenix

    Crash Course with Woodrow Phoenix

    “I wrote this book to make you mad.” So declares British writer and artist Woodrow Phoenix in the afterward of his new graphic novel Crash Course. Subtitled, “If You Want To Get Away With Murder, Buy a Car,” the book explores the powerful and toxic relationship between people and automobiles. With its stark and beautifully hand-drawn images of roads, traffic symbols, cities and highways, Crash Course takes aim at the ways in which cars have shaped the built environment, politics, and even the human psyche, largely for the worse. Crash Course unpacks the term “road rage,” explains why traffic accidents are anything but, and dispels the notion that people can be neatly separated into categories such as motorist, cyclist or pedestrian. It also examines the dangers of SUVs, the perils of driverless cars and the recent and growing trend of vehicles being used as weapons against demonstrators in places such as Charlottesville, Virginia. In this one-on-one conversation, Woodrow Phoenix talks to Doug about the unique combination of artistry and journalism that makes Crash Course an effective polemic, one that will hopefully persuade people to think carefully about their responsibility when they get behind the wheel of a car.
    This episode was sponsored by Sidewalk Weekly, the new podcast from Sidewalk Labs.
    Support The War on Cars on Patreon and get nifty rewards like stickers, t-shirts, and even a copy of Crash Course.
    Buy a famous “buttery soft” War on Cars t-shirt at Cotton Bureau.
    Rate and review the podcast on iTunes.
    SHOW NOTES: 
    Purchase Crash Course and other books featured on The War on Cars via our official Bookshop.org page.
    More about Woodrow Phoenix at Street Noise Books.
    Superman battles reckless drivers in Action Comics No. 12, May 1939. (The War on Cars on Twitter)
    The Solo Cup Bike Lane (BrookynSpoke) and the #RedCupProject (Bicycling Magazine).
    This episode was produced and recorded by Doug Gordon and edited by Ali Lemer.
    Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1. 
    Questions, comments or suggestions? Shoot us an email: thewaroncars@gmail.com
    https://thewaroncars.org

    • 45 min
    StreetRidersNYC

    StreetRidersNYC

    In the span of one month the StreetRiders have become a major presence in the Black Lives Matter movement in New York. Their weekly bike protests have taken over streets, bridges and highways and attracted thousands of people of all ages to rally against police violence. In this interview, Doug talks with StreetridersNYC co-founder Orlando Hamilton about how he found his voice as a political organizer, what bicycles bring to the protest movement and what it feels like to look out and see 10,000 people filling the streets of Times Square all in support of Black lives.

    This episode was sponsored by Sidewalk Weekly, the new podcast from Sidewalk Labs.
    Support The War on Cars on Patreon. Contribution levels start at just $2/month!
    Rate and review us on iTunes.
    Buy a famous “buttery soft” War on Cars t-shirt at Cotton Bureau.
    SHOW NOTES: 
    Learn more about the StreetRidersNYC and follow them on Instagram and Twitter. 
    “How Protestors Are Using Their Bikes to Fight Racism” (Bicycling)
    “‘There’s no Bike Lanes. It’s Not Even Nice Roads’ - Biking As a Means of Protest and Exposing Racism” (Streetsblog)
    “10,000 bicyclists participated in Black Lives Matter bike ride” (Brooklyn Vegan)

    This episode was produced, recorded and edited by Doug Gordon. 
    Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1. 
    Questions, comments, ideas, complaints? Shoot us an email: thewaroncars@gmail.com
    https://thewaroncars.org

    • 26 min
    Democracy in the Streets

    Democracy in the Streets

    What are streets for? Who are streets for? And what makes a street feel truly safe, welcoming and comfortable for everyone? On May 25, police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota murdered George Floyd sparking an international uprising against systemic racism and police brutality. George Floyd’s murder took place in public, on the street. The global demontrations that followed George Floyd’s murder are also playing out in public, on the street. We often tend to look at the street as the place where the dramas of transportation policy play out -- bikes vs. cars vs. transit vs. pedestrians, and on and on. Oonee CEO Shabazz Stuart (remember him from Episode 34) has been out marching the streets of Brooklyn, dodging police batons and helicopters, and writing about the experience. In this episode he joins the War on Cars crew to talk about a more fundamental role for urban public space than mere transportation: “Streets,” Shabazz argues, “are for Democracy.” 
    We appreciate your Patreon contributions more than ever. Become a member and we’ll send you stickers, t-shirts, and more.  
    Rate and review us on iTunes.
    We love to see people marching in comfortable, light-weight War on Cars t-shirts and you can buy one at Cotton Bureau. 
    SHOW NOTES: 
    “Let the People March” by Shabazz Stuart (Streetsblog)
    ‘Safe Streets’ Are Not Safe for Black Lives by Dr. Destiny Thomas (CityLab)
    “To Trumpers, the Shared Space of the Street Is an Unprivatized Threat” by Justin Davidson (New York Magazine)
    “The Bicycle as a Vehicle for Protest” by Jody Rosen (New Yorker)
    “We Must Talk About Race When We Talk About Bikes” by Tamika Butler (Bicycling)
    “In Protest, the Power of Place” by Michael Kimmelman (New York Times)
    Tahrir Square Before and After

    This episode was edited by Ali Lemer. 
    Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1. 
    Questions, comments, ideas, complaints? Shoot us an email: thewaroncars@gmail.com
    https://thewaroncars.org

    • 26 min
    Victory?

    Victory?

    As cities around the world have gone into lockdown and instituted social distancing measures to slow the spread of the covid19 pandemic, something unexpected has happened: We’ve gotten an impromptu demonstration of the benefits of living with fewer cars and less driving. Seething gridlock has vanished, smoggy skies have cleared, global carbon emissions are way down, and forward-thinking mayors are rapidly re-programming their streets to give human beings the space that once belonged to motor vehicles. Is the world witnessing the wrenching, difficult birth of the car-free city? Or are we merely living in the brief moment before cities snap back into even deeper automobile dependence, the car serving as the ultimate personal protective equipment? Plus: We hear from City of Oakland Transportation Director Ryan Russo.
    Chip in a few bucks and support the war effort on Patreon. We will send you stickers and t-shirts! 
    Rate and review us on iTunes.
    Shouldn’t you buy your friend a War on Cars t-shirt at Cotton Bureau?
    Show Notes: 
    New Yorkers Are Thinking About Getting Cars Because of COVID-19. (Vice)
    Oakland banishing cars from 74 miles of city streets. ‘Oakland Slow Streets’ will open 10% of city’s roads for cyclists, pedestrians (Mercury News)
    Urban planner Mike Lydon is keeping track of all of the cities launching #Covid19Streets.
    Cities Close Streets to Cars, Opening Space for Social Distancing (New York Times)
    To help get essential workers around, cities are revising traffic patterns, suspending public transit fares, and making more room for bikes and pedestrians (CityLab)
    This episode was edited by Ali Lemer. Newsreel voiceover by Mike Rock. Parody ad voiceover by Leora Kaye. Newsreel and parody ad production by Curtis Fox. 
    Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1. 
    Questions, comments, ideas, complaints? Shoot us an email: thewaroncars@gmail.com
    https://thewaroncars.org

    • 31 min
    "Driving While Black" with Gretchen Sorin

    "Driving While Black" with Gretchen Sorin

    Historian Gretchen Sorin has written a fascinating new book, “Driving While Black: African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights,” that dives into the role the car played in the 20th-century African American experience. Sorin talked with Sarah about how in the Jim Crow era, when riding public transportation was often humiliating and downright dangerous for black Americans, the automobile provided a way for black families to get around with safety and dignity. She also explains how cars played an instrumental role in building the civil rights movement, and why white etiquette expert Emily Post wasn’t so comfortable with the rising popularity of the automobile.

    • 29 min

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To