2 episodes

In 2013-2014 the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities hosted a lecture series on the “Biology, Individuality, and the Humanities” that explored contemporary interactions between biology, philosophy, and the humanities. These lectures and discussions presented current research that spans traditionally separated fields. One lecture in the Fall and three lectures in the Spring semester focused on contemporary work in evolutionary development biology and the philosophical research on questions of biological information, identity, likeness, and causality. The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities is a new initiative at Yale that aims to foster communication, mutual understanding, collaborative research and teaching among diverse scientific and humanistic disciplines. It is made possible by the generosity of Richard (‘53) and Barbara Franke.

Biology, Individuality, and Humanity: Evolution, Biological Information and Development Yale University

    • Science

In 2013-2014 the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities hosted a lecture series on the “Biology, Individuality, and the Humanities” that explored contemporary interactions between biology, philosophy, and the humanities. These lectures and discussions presented current research that spans traditionally separated fields. One lecture in the Fall and three lectures in the Spring semester focused on contemporary work in evolutionary development biology and the philosophical research on questions of biological information, identity, likeness, and causality. The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities is a new initiative at Yale that aims to foster communication, mutual understanding, collaborative research and teaching among diverse scientific and humanistic disciplines. It is made possible by the generosity of Richard (‘53) and Barbara Franke.

    • video
    Information in Living Systems

    Information in Living Systems

    The source of order in living systems has been the key question at the boundary of biology and philosophy since the eighteenth century. Today it is widely believed that living systems differ from non-living because they are driven by information, much of which has accumulated during evolution, and much of which is genetically transmitted. But there is at present no specifically biological measure of information that can underpin this vision. In this lecture, I attempt to fill this gap by grounding the idea of biological information in contemporary philosophical work on the nature of causation. This approach to biological information is inspired by the early theoretical insights of the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, Francis Crick, but is general enough to capture the informational contribution of environmental factors in development, epigenetic information, and the emergence of new information in self-organizing processes.

    • 1 hr 22 min
    • video
    Integrating Generic and Genetic Explanations of Development

    Integrating Generic and Genetic Explanations of Development

    In a Franke Program in Science and the Humanities lecture, Alan Love, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota, spoke on "Integrating Generic and Genetic Explanations of Development".

    • 1 hr 7 min

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