51 episodes

CBT Radio brings you the latest in the cognitive and behavioral therapies, and other evidence-based psychotherapies. We provide content for professionals and consumers.

CBT Radio R. Trent Codd, III

    • Health & Fitness

CBT Radio brings you the latest in the cognitive and behavioral therapies, and other evidence-based psychotherapies. We provide content for professionals and consumers.

    CBT for Cancer Patients

    CBT for Cancer Patients

     
    Episode # 46
     
    In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Scott Temple, PhD about CBT with cancer patients. Some of the items they discuss in this episode include:
     
    The most salient psychological needs of cancer patients Eight organizing principles for a modern CBT  Combining validation strategies with guided discovery Addressing existential issues with CBT Unique considerations surrounding exposure with anxious cancer patients And, more!  
    Scott Temple, PhD Biography
    Scott Temple, PhD, is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, and is part of the University of Iowa Palliative Care Team. He is on the faculty in the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa and is also a founding fellow and a certified CBT trainer and consultant in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.
     
    Episode-related links and resources

     

    • 48 min
    Treating Suicidal Patients

    Treating Suicidal Patients

    Episode # 45
     
    Running Time: 48:52
     
    Podcast relevance: Professionals
     
    In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. speaks with Thomas Ellis, PsyD about the treatment of suicidal patients. Some of the items discussed in this episode include:
    Whether no-suicide contracts are efficacious and whether they reduce liability Whether suicidality is best seen as a symptom of another illness Developments in the suicidology literature Our ability to predict suicide on an individual basis The important distinction between risk factors and warning signs Minimum competency standards for treating suicidal patients And, more!  
    Thomas Ellis, PsyD Bio
     
    Thomas E. Ellis, PsyD, ABPP, is Senior Psychologist and past Director of Psychology at the Menninger Clinic, and Professor of Psychiatry in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Texas at Austin and his doctorate at Baylor University. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Clinical and Psychotherapy Divisions) and Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology (Cognitive Behavior Therapy). He is a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and Associate Fellow and Supervisor at the Albert Ellis Institute. His research and publications focus primarily on the problem of suicide, including cognitive characteristics of suicidal individuals and the effectiveness of suicide-specific therapeutic interventions. His books include Suicide Risk: Assessment and Response Guidelines (with W. Fremouw and M. dePerczel, 1990), Choosing to Live: How to Defeat Suicide through Cognitive Therapy (with C. Newman, 1996), and Cognition and Suicide: Theory, Research, and Practice (2006). He is the 2011 recipient of the Roger J. Tierney Award from the American Association of Suicidology, in recognition of distinguished contributions to the organization and the field of suicidology.
     
    Episode-related links and resources
     
    New Harbingerpublications has graciously offered a 35% discount to our colleagues and friends. If you'd like the discount simply follow this link:
    http://www.newharbinger.com/behavior-therapist
     
    Ellis, T.E., & Newman, C.F. (1996). Choosing to Live: How to Defeat Suicide through Cognitive Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger.
    Ellis, T. E., & Rufino, K. A. (2015). A psychometric study of the Suicide Cognitions Scale with psychiatric inpatients. Psychological Assessment, 27(1), 82–89. doi:10.1037/pas0000028
    Ellis, T. E., Rufino, K. A., Allen, J. G., Fowler, J. C., & Jobes, D. A. (2015). Impact of a suicide-specific intervention within inpatient psychiatric care: the collaborative assessment and management of suicidality. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 45(5), 556–566. doi:10.1111/sltb.12151
    Jobes, D. A. (2016). Managing suicidal risk: A collaborative approach (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford.
    Joiner, T. E. J. (2005). Why people die by suicide. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. doi:10.1037/13748-018
    May, A. M., & Klonsky, E. D. (2015). “Impulsive” Suicide Attempts: What Do We Really Mean? Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, (August). doi:10.1037/per0000160
    Nadorff, M. R., Ellis, T. E., Allen, J. G., Winer, E. S., & Herrera, S. (2014). Presence and persistence of sleep-related symptoms and suicidal ideation in psychiatric inpatients. Crisis, 35(6), 398–405. doi:10.1027/0227-5910/a000279
    Rudd, M. D., Berman, A. L., Joiner, T. E., Nock, M. K., Silverman, M. M., Mandrusiak, M., … Witte, T. (2006). Warning Signs for Suicide : Theory , Research , and Clinical Applications. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 36(3), 255–262.
    Shea, S. C. (2002). The Practical Art of Suicide Assessment: A guide for mental health professionals and substance abuse counselors. New York:

    • 48 min
    Training and Supervising Psychiatry Residents in CBT

    Training and Supervising Psychiatry Residents in CBT

    Episode # 44
    Running Time: 52:30
    Podcast relevance: Professionals
    In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Donna Sudak, MD about training and supervising psychiatric residents. Some of the items they discuss in this episode include:
    Historical overview of psychiatry training in evidence-based practice Problems with current training protocols in psychiatry Key suggestions for trainers of psychiatric residents to maximize their learning of CBT Obstacles to effective CBT training along with solutions Key findings in the supervision literature  
    Donna Sudak, MD Bio
    Donna M. Sudak, M.D., is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Dr. Sudak is Director of Psychotherapy Training, and lectures widely about topics in Cognitive Behavior Therapy, including topics such as Cognitive Conceptualization, Dialectical Behavior Therapy and training residents in Psychiatry in Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Sudak is a graduate of the Medical College of Pennsylvania, and completed her Psychiatry residency at the University of Washington. She has made a number of significant contributions to the literature in CBT education.

    In addition to her teaching responsibilities at Drexel University College of Medicine, Dr. Sudak is an adjunct faculty member at the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research and teaches residents at Albert Einstein and Thomas Jefferson University. She has a private practice in Philadelphia. She has an active research interest in psychiatric education, and has played a major role in developing suggested curricula and guidelines for resident competency in Cognitive Therapy.
     
    Episode-related links and resources:
     
    Teaching and Supervising CBT
     

     
    Forthcoming Training:
     
    Empirically Supported Educational Methods: Effective Tools to Teach CBT
    R. Trent Codd, III, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Center of WNC, P.A.
    Donna Sudak, Friends Hospital
    Leslie Sokol, Academy of Cognitive Therapy
    Marci Fox, Academy of Cognitive Therapy
    Oct 28, 2016
    ABCT Annual Convention - NYC
     
    Teaching and Supervising CBT
    Donna Sudak
    Feb 6-8, 2017
    Beck Institute

    • 52 min
    Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices

    Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices

    Episode #43
    Running Time: 36:21
    Podcast relevance: Professionals
    In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Shannon Wiltsey-Stirman, PhD about D & I. Some of the items they discuss in this episode include:
    The distinction between diffusion, dissemination and implementation What we currently know about dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices What one can do at an individual level to encourage dissemination of EBPs Important future directions for this literature  
    Shannon Wiltsey-Stirman Biography
    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005. She completed an internship at the VA Palo Alto Healthcare System, and returned to Philadelphia for postdoctoral training, where she received an NIMH-funded K99/R00 award to study implementation and sustainability of CBT in a partnership between Penn and the City of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and disAbility Services to implement cognitive therapy across the city’s network of providers. In 2009, Dr. Stirman joined the VA National Center for PTSD. Her research focuses on training and consultation, the development of scalable and valid measures of fidelity, and the identification of strategies to support the long-term sustainability of evidence-based practices in service settings. Dr. Stirman is now in the Dissemination and Training Division of the National Center for PTSD, and an Assistant Professor at Stanford University’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. In addition to leading the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Dissemination and Implementation Special Interest Group in 2013-2014, she founded a special interest group on Dissemination and Implementation at the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies, and has served as Advisory Board and Network of Expertise Member of the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration. She has served on the editorial board of Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the Canadian Institute for Health Research.
     
    Episode-related links and resources:
     
    Stirman, S.W., Gutner, C.A., Langdon, K. & Graham, J.R., Bridging the gap between research and practice in mental health service settings: An overview of developments in implementation theory and research, Behavior Therapy (2015), doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2015.12.001
     
     
    Aarons, G. A., Ehrhart, M. G., Farahnak, L. R., & Hurlburt, M. S. (2015). Leadership and organizational change for implementation (LOCI): a randomized mixed method pilot study of a leadership and organization development intervention for evidence-based practice implementation.Implementation Science, 10(1), 1.
     
    Creed, T. A., Wolk, C. B., Feinberg, B., Evans, A. C., & Beck, A. T. (2016). Beyond the Label: Relationship Between Community Therapists’ Self-Report of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Orientation and Observed Skills.Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 43(1), 36-43.
     
    Glisson, C., Schoenwald, S. K., Hemmelgarn, A., Green, P., Dukes, D., Armstrong, K. S., & Chapman, J. E. (2010). Randomized trial of MST and ARC in a two-level evidence-based treatment implementation strategy.Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 78(4), 537.
     
    Hemmelgarn, A. L., Glisson, C., & James, L. R. (2006). Organizational culture and climate: Implications for services and interventions research.Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 13(1), 73-89.
     
    Herschell, A. D., Kolko, D. J., Baumann, B. L., & Davis, A. C. (2010). The role of therapist training in the implementation of psychosocial treatments: A review and critique with recommendations. Clinical psychology review, 30(4), 448-466.
     
    Stirman, S

    • 36 min
    Misophonia

    Misophonia

    Episode #42

    Running Time: 1:18:09


    Podcast relevance: Professionals and Consumers

     

    In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Tom Dozier, BCBA about Misophonia. In this episode they discuss:


    The diagnosis and treatment of Misophonia
    The history of this disorder
    How Misophonic symptoms differ from the sensitivities present in persons on the Autism Spectrum
    Resources for professionals and consumers, including websites and apps

    Tom Dozier, BCBA Biography

    Thomas H. Dozier is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Tom has researched misophonia and worked to develop treatments since 2012, and he has shown that Misophonia includes an acquired physical reflex to the trigger sounds which causes extreme emotions of rage and disgust (a conditioned emotional response).    

     

    He developed the Neural Repatterning Technique and the Misophonia Trigger Tamer app to deliver this treatment.  Tom is the director of the Misophonia Treatment Institute, which promotes misophonia research, treatment, and awareness.  He received a Master of Science in Behavior Analysis and the Family from California State University, Stanislaus.  

     

    His primary career focus was parenting and parenting skills (see 3LParenting.com, guaranteedpt.com, or LDSParentCoach.org, but Tom became interested in misophonia because he worked with parents of children with misophonia.  He also realized that his adult daughter and one grandchild had misophonia. 

     

    Tom is the author of Understanding and Overcoming Misophonia, A Conditioned Aversive Reflex Disorder and had three published journal articles on misophonia in 2015.

     

    Episode-Related Links

     

    Websites:

     

    Misophoniatreatment.com

     

    Misophoniainstitute.org

     

    Apps:

     

    Misophonia Reflex Finder (available on Android and Apple devices)

     

    Misophonia Trigger Tamer (available on Android and Apple devices)

     

    Visual Trigger Tamer (Android only currently, but Apple devices in the works)

     

     

     

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Buddhist Psychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Buddhist Psychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Episode # 41

    Running Time: 35:50


    Podcast Relevance: Professionals

     

    In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Dennis Tirch, PhD about Buddhist Psychology and CBT. They discuss:


    What Buddhist Psychology is
    Why Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists should be interested in Buddhist Psychology
    What aspects of Buddhism remain to be explored by Cognitive and Behavioral researchers/therapists
    And, much more!


    Dennis Tirch, PhD Biography

     

    Dr. Tirch is the Founder and Director of The Center for Compassion Focused Therapy, the first clinical training center for Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) in the USA. Dr. Tirch is also the President of The Compassionate Mind Foundation USA – the North American wing of the training, research and development community for CFT. Dr. Tirch has been described as one of the country's foremost experts on CFT and the contextual psychology of compassion. He has dedicated his research and scholarship to bettering our understanding of how therapies like ACT and CBT can be strengthened and further developed by bringing a compassion focus to our work.



    Dr. Tirch is the author of  6 books, and numerous chapters and peer reviewed articles on mindfulness, acceptance and compassion in psychotherapy. His books include The Compassionate Mind Guide To Overcoming Anxiety, the first evidence-based self-help book to apply the science of compassion to the treatment of anxiety. Dr. Tirch is also the co-author of the books Emotion Regulation:  A Practitioner’s Guide, Mindfulness in Clinical Practice, and The ACT Practitioner’s Guide to The Science of Compassion. This Autumn, the co-authored book, Buddhist Psychology and CBT: A Clinician's Guide will be released.

    Dr. Tirch is a New York State licensed clinical psychologist who served as an Assistant Clinical Professor at Weill-Cornell Medical College, and as an Adjunct Associate Professor at Albert Einstein Medical School. Dr. Tirch is an Associate Editor of the Journal for Contextual Behavioral Science. 

    Prior to founding The Center, Dr. Tirch collaborated with leading CBT therapist, Dr. Robert Leahy, at The American Institute for Cognitive Therapy for 12 years, serving as Associate Director of The Institute. Dr. Tirch has worked closely with CFT Founder, Dr. Paul Gilbert, in the development of compassion focused approaches for anxiety, using elements of ACT, which are currently being researched. Dr. Tirch is a Diplomate, Fellow & Certified Consultant & Trainer for The Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Tirch is a Founding Fellow and the President of The New York City CBT Association, & The Compassion Focused Special Interest Group of The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS). Tirch is also President Emeritus of The New York City Chapter of The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science.Tirch's work has been covered by numerous media outlets, from The Wall Street Journal to O Magazine.



    Dr. Tirch regularly conducts training workshops globally and serves as an invited speaker for many organizations, such as Columbia University, The University of New South Wales, The University of Hong Kong, The NYC-CBT Association, ABCT, ACBS, New York Univeristy, Cornell University, and the Kagyu Samye Ling Buddhist monastery in Scotland. Dr. Tirch also provides online consultation groups and webinar based trainings, and has delivered these for The Association for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ABCT)  and The Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy (IMP).

    Throughout his clinical experience, Dr. Tirch has specialized in the treatment of anxiety, mood disorders, trauma, addictions, and relationship problems.

    His internship and post-doctoral residency took place at the Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center in Bedford, MA., where he served as the Assistant Director of the Bedford CBT Center, co-authored articles based on research supp

    • 35 min

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