50 episodes

University of California faculty present the latest findings in genetic research and discoveries.

Genetics (Audio) UCTV

    • Science

University of California faculty present the latest findings in genetic research and discoveries.

    Your Genetic Privacy in the Big Data Era - Exploring Ethics

    Your Genetic Privacy in the Big Data Era - Exploring Ethics

    In the United States, privacy is considered a fundamental right. Yet today our activities are followed to a degree unfathomable not long ago by way of cell phones, online behaviors, and more. As genomic technologies continue to expand, another avenue now exists by which we may potentially be scrutinized: DNA sequence. Our genetic information contains our most private details, but we leave it everywhere and share the sequence closely with dozens or even hundreds of relatives. Laura Rivard, PhD, professor of biology at the University of San Diego, discusses ways in which our DNA may "escape" from our control, what can actually be done with the sequence, and whether there is cause for concern. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Show ID: 34998]

    • 52 min
    Sensory Implications of Brain Organoids with Patricia Churchland

    Sensory Implications of Brain Organoids with Patricia Churchland

    What defines consciousness? Can it develop in a petri dish? Patricia Churchland reviews the current state of brain organoid research and shares her views on how conciseness and physical structures within the brain intersect. She also cautions the media on the tendency to "over hype" new research advances. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Show ID: 35247]

    • 44 min
    The Current Status of Human Brain Organoids Research with Alysson Muotri and Larry Goldstein

    The Current Status of Human Brain Organoids Research with Alysson Muotri and Larry Goldstein

    The study of brain organoids is leading to a better understanding of human development and potential therapies for neurological disorders. Yet when people hear the phrase "brain in a dish" it instantly brings to mind the stuff of science fiction - labs full of sentient brains thinking and plotting. Alysson Muotri explains why these organoids should not called "brains in a dish" and how they are being used to explain human processes previously inaccessible to study. While underscoring scientific value of these organoids, he also raises the question of what ethical questions demand an answer as the technology improves. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Show ID: 35245]

    • 36 min
    Stem Cells to the Rescue: Saving the Northern White Rhino from Extinction

    Stem Cells to the Rescue: Saving the Northern White Rhino from Extinction

    There are only two Northern White Rhinos left on the planet. How can we reverse extinction to save them and use the lessons learned to help other endangered species? Marisa L. Korody, PhD of the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research shares how scientists are using the latest in stem cell technology for a genetic rescue. Series: "Women in Science" [Show ID: 35227]

    • 39 min
    Editing the Code of Life: Into the Future with CRISPR Technology with Jennifer Doudna - 2019 Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest

    Editing the Code of Life: Into the Future with CRISPR Technology with Jennifer Doudna - 2019 Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest

    Jennifer Doudna, co-discoverer of CRISPR-Cas9, discusses how genome editing with CRISPR technology is transforming biology. CRISPR-Cas9, an RNA-guided enzyme with remarkable abilities to recognize and cleave DNA, operates by mechanisms that both explain its biological function and provide insights into technology development. Doudna covers research into this amazing family of proteins: where they came from, how they work and how CAS-9-based technologies are revolutionizing research, biomedicine and agriculture. Series: "Frontiers of Knowledge" [Show ID: 35215]

    • 57 min
    How to Make a Neuron and How Pioneer Factors May Find Their Targets

    How to Make a Neuron and How Pioneer Factors May Find Their Targets

    Marius Wernig, MD, PhD, discusses how his lab has worked to convert non-neuronal cell types (lymphocytes, pluripotent stem cells, fibroblasts, hepatocytes, lymphocytes) to neurons. The lab is now working on identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying induced lineage fate changes, the phenotypic consequences of disease-causing mutations in human neurons and other neural lineages. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 35063]

    • 58 min

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