38 episodes

Love is the Message: Music, Dance & Counterculture is a new show from Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert, both of them authors, academics, DJs and dance party organisers.

Tune in, Turn on and Get Down to in-depth discussion of the sonic, social and political legacies of radical movements from the 1960s to today. Starting with David Mancuso's NYC Loft parties, we’ll explore the countercultural sounds, scenes and ideas of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

”There’s one big party going on all the time. Sometimes we get to tune into it.” The rest of the time there’s Love Is The Message.

Love is the Message: Dance, Music and Counterculture Love is the Message podcast

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Love is the Message: Music, Dance & Counterculture is a new show from Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert, both of them authors, academics, DJs and dance party organisers.

Tune in, Turn on and Get Down to in-depth discussion of the sonic, social and political legacies of radical movements from the 1960s to today. Starting with David Mancuso's NYC Loft parties, we’ll explore the countercultural sounds, scenes and ideas of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

”There’s one big party going on all the time. Sometimes we get to tune into it.” The rest of the time there’s Love Is The Message.

    Counterculture to Modernity? Music from Africa in the 1960s

    Counterculture to Modernity? Music from Africa in the 1960s

    In this week's episode Jeremy and Tim expand their series on Afro-Psychedelia with a multi-show exploration of the music of Africa, beginning today in the 1960s. They discuss the contested and shifting conceptualisations of Africa through history, the emergence of Marcus Garvey and Pan-Africanism, Paul Gilroy's seminal book The Black Atlantic, and the production of the specific relationship between Black Americans and Africa as a form of identity.

    Jeremy and Tim look at the national liberation movements of the mid-twentieth century, starting with Highlife music in Ghana, Congolese Catholic chorales, and two legends of South African music and activism - Hugh Masekela and Miriam Makeba - including their improbable meeting in a musical production of King Kong. Finally, Tim and Jeremy link up Babatunde Olatunji's seminal album Drums of Passion with psychedelic currents already explored in the show like the Grateful Dead, John Coltrane, Santana, and the dancefloor of the Loft.

    Tim and Jeremy look at the national liberation movements of the mid-twentieth century, starting with Highlife music in Ghana, Congolese Catholic chorales, and two legends of South African music and activism - Hugh Masekela and Miriam Makeba - including their improbable meeting in a musical production of King Kong. Finally, Tim and Jeremy link up Babatunde Olatunji's seminal album Drums of Passion with psychedelic currents already explored in the show like the Grateful Dead, John Coltrane, Santana, and the dancefloor of the Loft.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.  Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    Babatunde Olatunji - Gin-Go-Lo-Ba
    Santana - Jingo
    E T Mensah - Ghana Freedom
    E. K.'s No. 1 Band - Ene Maa Abaso
    Les Troubadours Du Roi Baudouin -- Sanctus (Missa Luba Song)
    Monks of Keur Moussa - Le Seigneur Nous Offre Sa Bienveillance
    Hugh Masakela - Grazing in the Grass
    Miriam Makeba - Kwazulu (In the Land of the Zulus)
    Letta Mbulu - Mahlalela

    Books:
    Paul Gilroy - The Black Atlantic
    John Chernoff - African Rhythms, African Sensibility: Aesthetics and Social Action in African Musical Idioms
    Ned Sublette - "The Kingsmen and the Cha-Cha-Cha". In Eric Weisbard (ed.), Listen Again: A Momentary History of Pop Music.
    Timothy Taylor - Global Pop: World Music, World Market

    • 1 hr 23 min
    LITM Extra - Afrofuturism pt.2 [excerpt]

    LITM Extra - Afrofuturism pt.2 [excerpt]

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this week's patrons-only episode, Tim and Jeremy continue their mini-series on the aesthetic and political content of Afrofuturism. Beginning with Kodwo Eshun's 1998 book More Brilliant Than The Sun, Tim and Jeremy interrogate the thinking of a number of academics and journalists around the Cybernetic Cultural Research Unit, their body of work around cyber theory, and the music of the 'Hardcore Continuum' in the context of '90s intellectual culture.

    Tim and Jeremy spend time talking about the Detroit Techno of Drexciya, consider the complex position of soulfulness within Afrofuturism, and dig further into the contested ideas around the promise of technology. Finally, we hear about the origins of dubstep, with Jeremy making a strident case against the aestheticization of alienated urban life under capitalism - with some swinging UK Garage thrown in for good measure.

    Tim and Jeremy will conclude with part 3 on Afrofuturism in a fortnight.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:
    Drexciya - Andreaen Sand Dunes
    Lenny Fontana - Spirit of the Sun (Steve Gurley Full Vocal Mix)
    Maddslinky - Dark Swing

    Books:
    Kodwo Eshun - More Brilliant Than the Sun
    Jeremy Gilbert & Ewan Pearson - Discographies: Dance, Music, Culture, and the Politics of Sound
    Donna Haraway - Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature

    • 13 min
    Flushing the Categories Away: Psychedelic Jazz

    Flushing the Categories Away: Psychedelic Jazz

    In this week's episode Tim and Jeremy describe the genres of psychedelic jazz and fusion. Drawing on rock, modal and free jazz and funk, as well as a wider pool of international musics, we hear how artists like Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Weather Report created - through processes of fusion and fission - a new sound. Tim and Jeremy consider the impact hearing the Grateful Dead had on Miles, the virtuosity and immanence of his trio of fusion albums, and the struggles he had in marketing this new music (with little understanding or help from the label suits).  

    We also hear about the various psychedelic qualities of the music and musicians, how rock displaced folk and jazz as the countercultural music of the moment, and join the dots between American jazz musicians and the improvisatory brilliance of the Indian Classical tradition.  

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.  

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!  

    Tracklist:
    Joe Harriott - Mishra Blues
    The Grateful Dead - The Other One
    Miles Davis - Shhh
    Miles Davis - On The Corner
    Dorothy Ashby - For Some We Loved
    Weather Report - Orange Lady
    Les McCann - The Lovers
    Herbie Hancock - Raindance
    Mahavishnu Orchestra - Birds of Fire

    Books:
    Phil Freeman - Running the Voodoo Down: The Electric Music of Miles Davis
    Kevin Fellezs - Birds of Fire
    David Toop - Ocean of Sound

    • 1 hr 36 min
    LITM Extra - Afrofuturism pt.1 [excerpt]

    LITM Extra - Afrofuturism pt.1 [excerpt]

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In the first few episodes of our new series on Afro-Psychedelia we've mentioned the concept of Afrofuturism a few times, so we wanted to take a moment to record this supplementary patrons-only two-parter outlining exactly what we mean by the term. Beginning with Mark Derry's 1994 book Flame Wars, Tim and Jeremy expound the aesthetic and political components of Afrofuturism to serve as a helpful supplementary text to our main episodes.

    Tim and Jeremy cover Detroit Techno and the Belleville 3, the 'Golden Age' of Hip Hop, the particular position of Dub in the Afrofuturist imaginary, and the singular insights of Goldie, along with the antagonisms of Gangsta Rap, white libertarian cyberpunk culture and the politics and economics of the early '90s.

    Tim and Jeremy will be back in a fortnight with part two. In the mean time, do leave us a review on Apple podcasts if you can, it really helps us reach more people.  Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:  
    M500 & 3MB - Jazz is the Teacher
    Lee 'Scratch' Perry - Dub Revolutions
    Goldie - Inner City Life  

    Books:
    Mark Dery - Flame Wars
    John Corbett - Extended Play
    Michael Veal - Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae
    Paul Gilroy - The Black Atlantic  

    Films:
    The Last Angel of History

    • 5 min
    A City Called Heaven: Afro-Psychedelia in Gospel, Reggae, Acid Rock and Funk

    A City Called Heaven: Afro-Psychedelia in Gospel, Reggae, Acid Rock and Funk

    In the second episode of our third series, Tim and Jeremy describe a psychedelic aesthetic appearing in the transformative and rapturous musics of the American Black church, Rastafarian Jamaica and Nigeria, with reference to Gospel, Juju, Reggae and Funk. They counterpoint this with a strain of musical antipathy with roots in Plato and iterating in radical Protestant tendencies throughout history, while also pointing up the specific and slightly scary millenarianism to the utopias imagined through the tunes discussed.

    Tim and Jeremy also spend a good amount of time on the West Coast Acid Rock scene, contemplating the edginess of the sound and it's representation of paranoid psychoactive experiences; the musical expressions of Caribbean Brits in the early '70s; and touch some more on Afro-Futurism, with specific reference to the playful childlike energy of space-facing Parliament-Funkadelic.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.  Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Tracklist:

    Mahalia Jackson - A City Called Heaven
    The Staple Singers - This May be the Last Time
    The Voices of East Harlem - Shaker Life
    Love - Revelation Santana - Toussaint L'Ouverture
    Cymande - Dove
    King Sunny Adé - 365 Is My Number / The Message
    Nairobi Sisters - Promised Land
    Parliament - Mothership Connection (Star Child)

    and some reading for this week's episode:

    Jayna Brown, Black Utopias: Speculative Life and the Music of Other Worlds, Duke UP 2021
    Christopher Waterman, Juju: A Social History and Ethnography of an African Popular Music, University of Chicago Press, 1990
    Craig Werner, A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race and the Soul of America, Canongate 2002

    • 1 hr 24 min
    LITM Extra - What We're Listening To, Oct '21 [excerpt]

    LITM Extra - What We're Listening To, Oct '21 [excerpt]

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only bonus episode, Jeremy and Tim have a conversation about what music has been on their turntables recently.  

    In line with the themes of our new series, Tim and Jeremy have been on an Afro-Psychedelic tip recently. In this show they discuss the relational philosophies of early '70s anti-colonial Africa, the UK's brilliant current strain of psychedelic jazz, and link Floating Points' new release to Vangelis, prog rock and 'Hooked On Classics'.

    We also hear excerpts from the only record Hendrix ever produced, consider the importance of vocal records to a party, and hear some sublime House selections to lift your spirits as the weather gets colder.  This is part of a rough series of more conversational, unplanned episodes reflecting on what's been on our record players recently and what we've been up to that we'll be releasing to patrons to say thank you for your support.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    The tracks discussed are:

    Miriam Makeba - I'mm You'mm We'mm
    Floating Points - Promises mvt. 4
    Sly & the Family Stone - Everyday People
    Bunn Debrett Quintet - Someday
    Cat Mother & the All Night Newsboys - Track in A (Nebraska Nights)
    Soma World - Want This (feat. Falle)
    Phenomenal Handclap Band - Judge Not (Ray Mang Special Mix)
    Guided Souls - Freedom's Light
    Sofia Kourtesis - La Perla

    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

katemarcella ,

Love is the message

Impressed from the outset at the depth and breadth of knowledge from the two hosts about Black American music and culture, but also the way it intersects with counterculture and radical politics. But as I go deeper in, I’m SO impressed at the consistency, the nuance and infrastructural perspective.

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