16 episodes

Make This Movie is a serialized 12 episode filmmaking podcast from ShoHawk Media. It chronicles filmmaker Christopher Sakr's journey through producing his feature length film, Counterintelligence. Moving episodically through the entire filmmaking process—from writing and budgeting, to pre-procution, principal photography, through post and release—Sakr chronicles this micro budget production and how Counterintelligence came to be for just under $12,000. Throughout the production's journey, he's helped by his collaborators and friends, who lend their skills and voices.

Don't forget to subscribe to this show to stay tuned, rate and review it, and share with friends who like the same stuff as you!

For more relevant podcast information check out Shohawk.com/makethismovie

For more on Counterintelligence, check out counterflick.com

Make This Movie: A Filmmaking Series Christopher Sakr

    • TV & Film

Make This Movie is a serialized 12 episode filmmaking podcast from ShoHawk Media. It chronicles filmmaker Christopher Sakr's journey through producing his feature length film, Counterintelligence. Moving episodically through the entire filmmaking process—from writing and budgeting, to pre-procution, principal photography, through post and release—Sakr chronicles this micro budget production and how Counterintelligence came to be for just under $12,000. Throughout the production's journey, he's helped by his collaborators and friends, who lend their skills and voices.

Don't forget to subscribe to this show to stay tuned, rate and review it, and share with friends who like the same stuff as you!

For more relevant podcast information check out Shohawk.com/makethismovie

For more on Counterintelligence, check out counterflick.com

    Ep12: FINALE - Made This Movie

    Ep12: FINALE - Made This Movie

    We’ve reached the finale of Make This Movie, Season 1.
    Thank you so much for coming along on the ride to making Counterintelligence. Many lessons were learned throughout the process, most of which were covered throughout the season’s 12 episodes.
    To highlight the ones that were and insert a few that weren’t, in this episode Chris will go down the list of 12 lessons learned while making this movie—one lesson for each episode.
    You’ll hear a few statements to back up these lessons from a couple familiar voices, David Pennington, Andréa Tolbert, Michael Hall, Mike Elliott, and Tim Kahn. And you’ll be brought back to Chris’ audio diary.
    You’ll even hear Chris’ personal theory on the two types of people in the world: Spielberg people, and Scorsese people.
    Counterintelligence is nearly complete now, and due out in the fall of 2018. Not all lessons have been learned or even digested yet, but we hope the ones that have been mean something to you and your filmmaking.
    We’ll see you next year for Season 2 of Make This Movie. Thanks for making Season 1 a joy!
    For exclusive access to documents, guides, and detailed breakdowns, expanding on this and other episodes, sign up and ShoHawk.com/makethismovie!
    This episode’s guide includes a transcription of the lessons covered within the episode, as well as 5 BONUS lessons!
    EPISODE OUTLINE
    Lessons from collaboration The importance of passion 12 Lessons from making Counterintelligence A look back at why we make films

    • 40 min
    Ep 11: Release This Movie

    Ep 11: Release This Movie

    Season 1 of Make This Movie is nearing its end, but the season wouldn’t be complete without distribution.
    Distribution is the place where your film meets its audience; it’s where your baby ventures out on its own and overnight belongs to the world at large. And as with sending a child off on its own, the distribution process is replete with hard lessons and separation anxiety.
    In this episode, Chris covers the basics: from the heartbreak of the modern festival circuit, through different forms of distribution, finding an audience, and hatching a marketing strategy.
    He does this with the help of Jason Brubaker, founder of Filmmaking Stuff.
    Through excerpts from the Filmmaking Stuff Podcast, Jason shares insights into the new media landscape and how to harness niche markets to help your film find its fans, among other varied topics.
    They key to ethical and productive distribution and indie film marketing is honing in on an audience that is tailored to your film without spamming or hard-selling those who wouldn’t be interested in the first place.
    That’s the focus of this episode: showing filmmakers the possibilities available for pulling this off and remaining in control all the way through.
    You’ll even learn a bit about Counterintelligence’s plans and strategies that are yet untested. Let the marketplace be the final judge!
    For exclusive access to documents, guides, and detailed breakdowns, expanding on this and other episodes, sign up and ShoHawk.com/makethismovie!
    This episode’s Tool Kit is a comprehensive guide to distribution with tools, further reading and listening, and everything you need to get your film to market whenever it’s ready.
    Click here to view post on ShoHawk.com!
    EPISODE OUTLINE
    The modern film festival landscape Defining a film’s conditions of success How distribution companies work The tools provided by aggregators Finding a niche audience Ethically navigating the online media landscape When to choose direct distribution When “good” is better than “done”

    • 34 min
    Between The Frames: Post-Production

    Between The Frames: Post-Production

    In this Between The Frames segment, Chris discusses some specific post-production topics including:
    The facets of post, from start to finish Doing post from the start Managing the post-production flow Collaboration in post And, the creative post process He covers some best practices to get the most out of each.
    He also recommends a list of tools and apps that serve the post-production process, from organization to time management and communication. Here they are:
     
    Final Cut X - This is my chosen non-linear editing system. It doesn’t have to be yours. In short, I feel it’s a system designed more for the creative and less for the technical mind. But to each their own. If you haven’t tried it and want to form your own opinion, I recommend giving it a shot. Color Finale - This outstanding tool delivers professional grade color tools as a simple Final Cut effects plugin, allowing a colorist to do dynamic and high-quality work without ever leaving the initial editing application. I love it dearly and am hooked. Extensive Color Finale tools and tutorials can be found below. Logic Pro X - Apple’s standard professional audio application is the best and most affordable mixing option when editing is done in Final Cut. Unlike Pro Tools, it’s a one-time fee with most standard plug-ins and tools included. It was made even more worthwhile to me as I used it to produce the podcast associated with this guide, Make This Movie. Apple Motion - Apple’s standard professional graphics application is often under-utilized in the filmmaking world, with a host of tools including 3D animation, motion tracking, advanced coloring options, and more. I also used it to build my own effects plugins for Final Cut. It’s really helpful.  
    For the full post production workflow and tool list, check out our in-depth Post-Production Tool Kit by signing up at shohawk.com/makethismovie. It includes not only the tools, but essential tutorials to get you through the extended post process!

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Ep10: Finish This Movie

    Ep10: Finish This Movie

    Having locked the cut of Counterintelligence, there’s still a whole world of post that needs completion, even at the time of this episode.
    On the docket: scoring, color correcting, some minor visual effects, sound design, and sound mixing.
    Our score was composed by the great Noah Simons. Sound was mixed by Mike Elliott, who you’ll recall was also our Director of Photography. Everything else was done by me, and that’s where it got murky.
    As you’ll hear in the episode, the extended post tasks like coloring and VFX require a great deal of attention, organization, planning, and most of all accountability.
    Without these factors at play, post can drag on forever. On Counterintelligence, it certainly feels like it has.
    The finishing touches of post can get completely underrated in pre-production. They are where the film truly becomes a film, and as important to the filmmaking process as anything else. They deserve a filmmaker’s full attention.
    In this episode you’ll briefly hear from Noam Kroll, host of the fantastic Show Don’t Tell podcast on filmmaking efficiency. You’ll also hear from composer Noah Simons on creating the score, and sound mixer Mike Elliott on how that process worked—or didn’t—and how we made lemonade, Beyonce style.
    Most of all, you’ll hear why things like plans and strict deadlines are crucial, especially when working for yourself.
    For exclusive access to documents, guides, and detailed breakdowns, expanding on this and other episodes, sign up and ShoHawk.com/makethismovie!
    The guide for this episode includes hours of tutorials on specific post production tasks, so don’t miss it. It’s like a masterclass!
    EPISODE OUTLINE
    Why post-production help is important Working with a composer Inefficiency of experimentation Color tools and methodology Painting with sound design Audio organization What sound mixing does The sound mixing process explained

    • 44 min
    Ep9: Cut This Movie

    Ep9: Cut This Movie

    We’ve arrived at post production. More specifically, editing Counterintelligence.
    The editing process was multi-layered, from cutting scenes throughout production as they were shot, all the way up to merging those scenes into a rough cut, and refining into locked picture.
    Editing is where the film gets made: the final vision takes shape at this almost final step in the process.
    It’s said that three different films are made throughout the filmmaking process: one on the page, another in production, and a third and final film in post.
    This episode explores that process of sculpting the final vision through refining fragments, trimming fat, shaping pace and tone, and reviewing in stages with the braintrust through screenings for notes and input.
    Editing can be all-consuming, demanding a fine balance between finely tuned focus and the freedom to experiment.
    In this episode you’ll hear from Noam Kroll, host of the fantastic Show Don’t Tell podcast on editing efficiency. I also bring back Rachel and Marc from my braintrust to discuss their notes on early screenings, and co-producer/art director Dre Tolbert on those notes and balancing work and relationships.
    This episode is primarily geared toward those producing and directing filmmakers who choose to edit their own work, but it carries over to anyone responsible for editing feature films.
    For exclusive access to documents, guides, and detailed breakdowns, expanding on this and other episodes, sign up and ShoHawk.com/makethismovie!
    Click here to see this post on ShoHawk.com
    EPISODE OUTLINE
    Editing efficiency using the 80/20 principle Trimming the fat off your story Integrating improvisation into scripted scenes Experimenting with tone and structure Adding new texture Playing off current events to enrich a film Screening for notes Work/life balance through the editing process

    • 43 min
    Between The Frames: Production

    Between The Frames: Production

    In this Between The Frames segment, Chris discusses some specific production topics including:
    Filmmaking as jazz Improvisation Knowing your actors personally Asking for input Self-care Problem solving/conflict resolution Being present He covers their importance and some best practices to get the most out of each.
    He also recommends a list of tools and resources in the form of books, apps, and podcasts that serve the pre-production process, from organization to time management and communication. Here they are:
    The Q&A With Jeff Goldsmith.This podcast is an invaluable resource. The back-catalog is astoundingly large and you’ll have inspiration for weeks. Goldsmith knows how to ask the right questions of his guest filmmakers, actors, writers, etc. The Treatment.Host Elvis Mitchell has been around for a while and is a great lover of cinema. He’s done some great interviews from the past and, in this regular show, he dives into true filmmaking craft and appreciation. The Director's Cut.Brought to you by the Director’s Guild of America, this interview show features some Q&As with today’s biggest directors, including Darren Aronofsky, Guillermo Del Toro, Quentin Tarantino, and many many more. There’s no shortage of information here. Off Camera With Sam Jones.Sam Jones sits down with great actors and film/TV artists to discuss process. Not only is it fascinating from a fan perspective, but you’ll get many little gems about onset dynamics and how-tos. Rebel Without A Crew, by Robert Rodriguez.I don’t think there’s a more reputable or important book on independent filmmaking out there. This one is like a bible of sorts. If you haven’t heard of it before, you just need to read it. That’s all there is to it. The Daily Show (The Oral History), by Chris Smith, forward by Jon Stewart.This book was a great peak inside how an American institution grew, evolved, and engendered a collaborative production environment, even under great pressure and scrutiny. It’s a great example of production health being a top-down enterprise. The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir, by William Friedkin.This was not only a remarkable walk through a truly remarkable period in cinema history, but also a powerful reminder that your filmmaking principals should be firm. The audiobook is also read by Friedkin himself. Robert Altman: The Oral Biography, by Mitchell Zuckoff. Altman is one of American cinema’s truest pioneers—a filmmaker’s filmmaker in the classic sense. This book cobbles together interviews with his family, friends and collaborators—many of whom belong to multiple categories. Through their testimonials the reader gets a comprehensive sense of Altman’s unique and collectivist process. The truest example of filmmaker as jazz band leader. Headspace app. This app got me through some very stressful times while producing Counterintelligence. You can do the 10 day beginners course for free, then pay to access advanced and specific courses, like meditations to enhance focus, reduce stress, calm anxiety, and sleep better. I’ve tried many of these to great results. If you’re about to undergo a production, this definitely will not hurt you to try. Click here to visit this info on ShoHawk.com!

    • 1 hr 4 min

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