113 episodes

Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space, and we're here to help professionals stay up-to-date on the latest trends and best practices so they can be more effective in their jobs.

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast Sales Enablement PRO

    • Business

Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space, and we're here to help professionals stay up-to-date on the latest trends and best practices so they can be more effective in their jobs.

    Episode 113: Petek Hawkins on Why Enablement Must Co-Own Revenue

    Episode 113: Petek Hawkins on Why Enablement Must Co-Own Revenue

    Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs.

    Today, I’m really excited to have Petek Hawkins from Fivetran join us. Petek, I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience.

    Petek Hawkins: Yeah. Hi Shawnna. Thank you so much for having me here on this podcast. I’m really excited to share some best practices and hope everybody finds benefit in them. My name’s Petek and I am the head of global learning enablement and development, and I oversee the entire revenue teams, engineering teams, and product teams’ enablement as well as our learning and development initiatives in the company globally.

    SS: Fantastic. Well, I’m very excited to have you join us Petek, because I noticed on LinkedIn, you had said that sales enablement needs to co-own revenue growth. I’d love to hear from your perspective, why is it important for sales enablement to play a role in this?

    PH: That is a great question. I believe that we do need to be owners of revenue because first and foremost, it gives us skin in the game, right? We have something to work towards and it’s something that we can connect to. And when you are a part of that revenue growth, you actually have more buy-in internally and externally. And if you can really tie all your initiatives, all your projects and programs to revenue, not only you are able to show the company your worth to the company and impact to the company, and also you’re able to, really emphasize the importance of enablement and you can get more resources.

    So, it’s a win-win situation for everyone internally and from the customer experience standpoint, again, enablement, in my opinion, is revenue enablement and they go hand in hand and it’s because it impacts customer experience. So, if you can impact the customer experience that in return impacts your business that is again, win-win for everybody.

    SS: Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. Now for those in the audience that are a little bit kind of less experienced, I’d love for any advice that you have around how our listeners can align their sales enablement efforts really to their organization’s revenue growth strategy.

    PH: That is not an easy task Shawnna. And as you can imagine, there’s a lot that goes into that. However, first and foremost, I would say try to find an organization that really embraces the impact and the importance of enablement to begin with because when you do that, then you can start aligning with your C level executives on what the vision is and how the company is going to take advantage of your enablement projects. From there, really align with the businesses that you work with. So, a lot of the sales enablement work directly with sales organization only. However, with more evolved enablement, you do work with the rest of the go-to-market. You start working at product, you start working with marketing, revenue ops, and so on. So, it’s really important to understand what their company strategy is, what are they looking to implement as initiatives as a part of that strategy and what can you do to help enable their teams and enable their revenue?

    So how do you do that? You literally, as soon as you get started at a company, go meet with these people, let them get to know you, show them what you do, make it very clear on the programs that you’re running and what those programs entail. Once you do that, then it’s really important that once the project started evolving and a program starts forming, ask your key stakeholders to tie metrics, key metrics, at everything that you’re doing, because if you’re able to do that, then you can show dashb

    • 14 min
    Episode 112: Jen Scandariato on Embracing a Winning Mindset for Professional Growth

    Episode 112: Jen Scandariato on Embracing a Winning Mindset for Professional Growth

    Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs. Today I’m excited to have Jen for joining us. Jennifer, I’d love for you to introduce yourself, your role within your industry to our audience.

    Jen Scandariato: Sure. Thanks for having me. I’m excited to be here. And, so call me Jen. Jennifer, sometimes I feel like it’s my father yelling at me because I’m in trouble. I am a female in tech, or women in tech. I’ve been doing this for about 25 years. Out of school, I wanted to be an accountant. I went to go work for a CPA firm, and after about six months, I was like, yeah, this isn’t for me. So, I went back to school and studied and started in IT and I’ve been in IT for over 25 years.

    SS: Well, Jen, we’re really excited to have you. And as you mentioned in your intro, you’ve been a strong advocate for women in tech and women in business. So, could you give us some insights into your own journey navigating the industry and really being able to rise to leadership levels throughout your career?

    JS: Yeah, it’s been interesting. Nothing is like straight up or straight across, it’s definitely a wiggly line as you build your career, as most people know. When I was done with the CPA firm, I went to go work in computers. I was really excited about IT. And somebody had mentioned it’s a man’s world and I’m like, what are you talking about? I don’t think so. And my next trip, after that conversation, I was on the bus heading to go get my rental car after I flew into an airport and I looked around and it was all men. I’m like, “they’re so right. This is a man’s world”. I never recognized that.

    I think what the reason why I’m so passionate about females in tech is I’ve noticed in conversations with the other females, they would say, “Oh, this job description says, they’re looking for a rock star and I just won’t apply.” And I’d be like, “That’s crazy. Don’t you think you’re a rock star?” And they’re like, “It just describes a very competitive environment that I’m not interested in.” And if I wasn’t in it, I would definitely be in psychology because that piqued my interest. I was like, “Tell me more. I need to understand this. Why would you feel that way?” So, it’s definitely been a journey for me, but I think because of my ability to take risk and just dive right in and kind of lead into projects. I can never recognize the imbalance of men versus females until it was brought to my attention.

    SS: That’s absolutely fantastic. And I think you’re absolutely right. I think there is a psychological element to that sometimes with women. I remember the meme that was going around when Kanye West said that he was going to run for president. I couldn’t agree more, and I think the same thing exists with women that are in sales enablement, because there is a technical and a sales component to that, and both have historically been predominantly male-dominated roles. So, I’m really excited to have you here to talk to us about this. I’d love to learn from you some of the things that have worked well for you in particular. I know mentorship has been helpful in your professional development. So, can you tell us a little bit about how that’s helped you evolve?

    JS: Yeah, I would say that I didn’t really have formal mentors. I think I’m mature enough in my career that it was prior to people telling you, make sure you have a mentor and make sure you have a sponsor. I think what I did was I wanted to surround myself with people that were brilliant and then I could learn from. You never want to be the smartest person in the room bec

    • 17 min
    Episode 111: Michelle Dotson on Delivering Your Sales Kickoff Virtually

    Episode 111: Michelle Dotson on Delivering Your Sales Kickoff Virtually

    Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs.

    Today I’m excited to have Michelle Dotson from Zoom join us. Michelle, I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience.

    Michelle Dotson: Perfect. Thank you, Shawnna, for having me. I’m so excited. My name is Michelle Dotson. I am the senior manager of Zoom sales enablement team, and we have a global team right now running enablement for all of our revenue organization within Zoom.

    SS: I’m extremely excited to have you here with us, Michelle. You and I were just talking about this, but you have recently hosted a completely virtual sales kickoff, and you also had written an article on it about the sales kickoff where you talked about how important it is to acknowledge the challenges that people might be facing right now due to all of the uncertain times that we’re in. I’d love to hear from you why is this important and how did you do this during your recent SKO?

    MD: Sure. So, I think in creating a virtual SKO the biggest thing that we had to focus on is creating connection. And so, when I was meeting with my leadership team, what I stressed with them is you can’t connect without being vulnerable and being real. People are going to feel like it’s watching a Netflix episode that doesn’t relate to them. And so, we urged our team, really in our leadership and anyone who was presenting, to if you could make light of how hard it is to be working from home, to address all of the different things that are happening in the world, and to connect people and to meet them where they are.

    So, some people are raising children and they have virtual schooling going on right next to them while they attend your SKO. Some people are worried about the political unrest that we have in several different countries. There are people who are worried about their spouses who might be front essential workers in this whole COVID crisis that we’re in. So, if you can’t address what’s real and what’s happening, I think you instantly will lose an audience and lose that connection. So, in our keynotes, in our product main stage sessions, in even some of the more fun and casual sessions that we created we urged people to just be real. So that was kind of the basis of where I tell people in the article to address what’s going on in the world.

    SS: I love that. Keeping it open real is critical right now and transparency is so valued within the organizations. So, obviously Zoom is a relatively large organization and given that your sales kickoff was virtual this year, how did you guys tailor that experience for the employees in different time zones and maybe regions?

    MD: Sure. So typically, an in-person event, you get to, let’s just say, fly everyone to Las Vegas. You have that typical ballroom setup, you throw a party, you know how that goes. Virtually you can’t force everyone to look at the same screen and you are now dealing instead of one location, we had over 50 different countries attending this event. And so, what we had to think about and really look at is the data of our audience. And so, I’ve been in sales ops and sales enablement for over 10 years, so I tend to look at data and really dissect it. Who is attending? What time zones are they in? What’s their tenure? How do I tailor this event so that from the moment they are logging on they are engaged and it’s relevant to them?

    So, after looking at our attendee information, we realized that we had 2200 people globally who needed to attend and that it would be best for us to have three agendas. So, we ran a Pacific or North America agenda o

    • 16 min
    Episode 110: Jamin Fochtman on How to Host an Engaging Sales Kickoff in 2020

    Episode 110: Jamin Fochtman on How to Host an Engaging Sales Kickoff in 2020

    Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs.

    Today, I’m excited to have Jamin from Addepar join us. Jamin, I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience.

    Jamin Fochtman: Sure. Thanks for having me on today Shawnna. I’m happy to be here. As you mentioned, I’m Jamin Fochtman with Addepar. I am the head of our sales enablement team and we specialize in performance of reporting and analytics for folks who manage money. So, happy to join and share some insights as to what we’ve been doing this year.

    SS: Absolutely. I’m very excited because you and I were just chatting, and you recently executed your sales kickoff. And I think right now that is top of mind for sales enablement professionals across the board. So, I’d love to hear from you, how was your event structured and delivered this year in particular?

    JF: Yeah and this year, obviously it was a little bit different, but for us, as we really thought about getting the team together, it was critical not just to sort of tackle the standard things that we do at a kickoff in a normal year. For us, I also put a really high level of emphasis in terms of team engagement and making sure that people really embraced the days together rather than just dialing into another zoom. So that was really important for us.

    Ours was structured over two days where we dove into key wins, key losses, took some time on new product development, as well as marketing initiatives. But I will say this year, we put a little bit more emphasis on taking time to celebrate the wins across all of the different teams. And that came out of kind of soul searching, where we were looking back and noticing folks didn’t necessarily know what other teams were doing when it came to our AEs BDRs, AM’s all working really hard but not necessarily knowing what each team was doing and the big wins that they were having. So, we did, we spent nearly 50% of our time really digging in and celebrating key wins and how those wins were achieved.

    SS: I love that. And I think you’re absolutely right in this more remote environment it’s very hard to stay connected in that manner. So, I think that’s absolutely critical to accomplish during SKO this year. So, tell us a little bit about what this new planning process looks like.

    JF: It was fast. So, we kind of took a step back and I actually did, it was really helpful for me to do a dry run with just a 45-minute team meeting. So, I wanted to kind of feel out. So, very important to highlight we used zoom for our sales kickoff, and I just wanted to test out a few different workflows. Whether it was going into breakout rooms, did people stay engaged? Did they not? Doing shorter sessions, did people feel more comfortable, really focusing? So that was critical for my planning phase was doing just a dry run in terms of using the functionality and see how the team responded to that functionality. The other piece, I guess it felt very new normal when it came to planning our sales kickoff in that I was still meeting with key stakeholders. We were going through presentations, making sure that all the material was on point. So, I’ll be really honest Shawnna, my planning felt very similar to any other year.

    SS: Well, that’s good to hear. And I think for those in the audience, maybe if this is, you know, per se, their first sales kickoff that they’ve ever had to do, I’d love for you to give them some insight into who all is typically involved in the planning and execution of a sales kickoff. What other departments, and you mentioned stakeholders, are you partnering with to ensure tha

    • 12 min
    Episode 109: Avner Baruch on Building an Effective Enablement Function From Scratch

    Episode 109: Avner Baruch on Building an Effective Enablement Function From Scratch

    Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs.

    Today, I’m excited to have Avner from WalkMe join us. Avner, I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience.

    Avner Baruch: Hi, thanks Shawnna for the introduction. First, I’d like to start by thanking you all for putting this together and for having me here. I think it’s a great honor and opportunity to be able to help and contribute to the entire enablement community, especially coming from a non-traditional approach, which I’ll happily share more of as we go.

    So, a little bit about myself, I’m actually an electrical engineer and I feel it’s important to share that. And you know, that brings me to the next point. Unlike the traditional journey, I did not start my career in the sales space. As a matter of fact, I had nothing to do with sales but for a very specific reason, I decided to shift my career to the training space which later turned into coaching and sales enablement. My journey, that includes a few milestones if you’re boarding milestones, but altogether I was able to establish sales enablement functions from the ground up from absolutely nothing for hyper-growth companies such as Incapsula, which later turned, or was acquired by Imperva and over the last two years, WalkMe. And, I always had the privilege to start something from scratch and define and build the foundations rather than resume or replace someone else’s work and over the last 10 years or so I’ve been developing my own approach to sales enablement. Probably that explains why I have been called the nontraditional enablement guy. And as for the current role here at WalkMe, I actually joined WalkMe two years ago. I was brought in to help building and scaling a new sales organization from scratch based on my previous experience with some of the executives here.

    At that time when I joined, WalkMe already had a few offices and a very successful and solid footprint in the US but the idea was to expand our footprint and establish a new sales organization that focuses on the international regions with a different sales model geared towards a quick landing followed by data and expansion. The bottom line is I see enablement as a key factor, which expands beyond the traditional training responsibility and onboarding areas. One area in particular, which I’m very fond of is revenue intelligence. In most cases, that falls under BI. But in my opinion, I think that today sales enablement more than ever needs to set foot in that area and become more dominant or at least try to contribute from their experience.

    SS: Yeah, I love that. So Avner, tell us a little bit about what your approach is to sales enablement then since it’s nontraditional, I’d love to hear more.

    AB: Actually, it’s a combination of a few approaches. First, I’m a hands-on person with a very strong blend of technical and sales skills, given my experience, my technical background, this allows me to wear different hats and that’s basically the secret sauce of my success. Be able to change hats according to whoever you talk to. Either work very closely with product managers, dive into bits and bites of the product, and get a better understanding of what’s our offering. And then when you go back to sales, you just, you know, change hats, play a different place, play a different language.

    Sometimes you have to talk high level, sometimes you have to dive into details, but it’s not about features it’s about values. But I think what makes a very successful enablement in today’s environment, a challenging environment, is the ability to talk te

    • 21 min
    Episode 108: Evangeline Earl on Bridging Skill Gaps Through Training and Coaching

    Episode 108: Evangeline Earl on Bridging Skill Gaps Through Training and Coaching

    Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs.

    Today, I’m excited to have Evangeline Earl from Granite Telecommunications join us. Evangeline, I’d love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience.

    Evangeline Earl: Yeah, thank you so much for inviting me to participate today, Shawnna. It’s a real pleasure to meet you and I’m looking forward to further discussions this morning. So, my name is Evangeline Earl and I am a senior corporate sales trainer for Granite Telecommunications. So, I have been with Granite for almost four and a half years now, and I actually started out in a sales role in business development, where I was bringing in new business logos for the company, before transitioning over to my sales training role, which I’m currently in.

    So, Granite we have been around since 2002 and the best way to describe us is we are the largest managed services provider for wireless and wireline services in North America. So essentially, we have gained our success over the years by working with multi-location businesses, think about companies like Walmart, Starbucks or Home Depot, they’re all current Granite customers. And no matter where a brick and mortar business is located across the United States, across Canada, Granite through our wholesale partnerships with other telecom providers, we are able to provide service for phone, for internet, for any infrastructure cabling that’s needed for those brick and mortar locations.

    My role here at the company is to, in addition to conducting our onboarding training every single month for our brand new sales hires, in addition to that, I also provide ongoing coaching, ongoing support for the sales reps throughout their first full year of employment at the company. And then as well, I also design different training programs, different workshops, which we conduct with the sales reps based around some of the skill gaps we’re seeing or some of the needs that are brought to our attention. And I work very closely with senior leadership, including the sales directors, as well as our senior vice president of sales. And even up to our CEO of the company.

    SS: Well, I’m extremely excited to have you join us today. And as you mentioned in your intro, one of your areas of expertise is really around sales training. In your experience, what steps do you take when developing a new sales training program from scratch?

    EE: Sure. No, that’s a great question. Really, we kind of work backward. So, we first want to figure out what is the ultimate goal of that training program, and then design the sessions, the material around that goal. So, if there’s a certain skill gap that we’re seeing, for example, recently we’ve been working with our sales reps on storytelling. So how do we get better at conveying stories through our messaging, with our prospects, with our existing customers?

    That is one way that we really focus on designing new training programs is really just looking at what the goal is that we’re trying to achieve whether that’s a skill gap, whether that’s a business goal, maybe there’s a certain product set that we haven’t really been selling much of. And so, we want to focus on how can we improve the rep’s knowledge around that area. We also do a lot of work across the organization working with subject matter experts. For example, we have a lot of different department leaders that we like to get involved in our trainings. So, it’s not just the sales training team that is conducting these trainings, but we like to bring in those people who are extremely knowledgeable on the subjects

    • 18 min

Top Podcasts In Business

Listeners Also Subscribed To