98 episodes

The Sunday Salon is a podcast celebrating brilliant books and the women who write them, hosted by journalist Alice-Azania Jarvis. Each week she chats to an inspiring female author about her work, her career, how she writes, what she reads and everything in between. This is not some academic textual analysis – it’s about finding the stories behind the stories. Tune in each Sunday to hear from guests including Isabel Allende, Jessie Burton, Holly Bourne, Diana Evans, Elizabeth Day, Nimco Ali and Sophie Kinsella.
Edited by Chelsey Moore.

The Sunday Salon with Alice-Azania Jarvi‪s‬ The Sunday Salon

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    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

The Sunday Salon is a podcast celebrating brilliant books and the women who write them, hosted by journalist Alice-Azania Jarvis. Each week she chats to an inspiring female author about her work, her career, how she writes, what she reads and everything in between. This is not some academic textual analysis – it’s about finding the stories behind the stories. Tune in each Sunday to hear from guests including Isabel Allende, Jessie Burton, Holly Bourne, Diana Evans, Elizabeth Day, Nimco Ali and Sophie Kinsella.
Edited by Chelsey Moore.

    Gaby Hinsliff on getting a work life balance without losing ambition and why we need to talk about Betty Friedan 

    Gaby Hinsliff on getting a work life balance without losing ambition and why we need to talk about Betty Friedan 

    This week's guest is the journalist Gaby Hinsliff, former political editor of the Observer and now a columnist and writer for the Guardian and others. This was such a dream interview in so many ways - I've admired Gaby's journalism for years, and I loved her book Half a Wife: The Working Family's Guide to Getting a Life Back when it came out nine years ago. Examining the compromises men and women make to juggle work and home, and the benefits of workplaces taking a new more flexible approach, it feels pretty timely right now, almost a decade on. Now Gaby has written the introduction to the first ever UK ebook edition of The Feminine Mystique, published  to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Betty Friedan’s birth. It looks at the incredibly important role she played in freeing women from the cult of domesticy - but also at more problematic elements of Friedan's life, including her homophobic comments. It's a refreshingly mature way to approach an historic text and I loved talking to Gaby about that, as well as about breaking boundaries when she became the youngest political editor of a national newspaper -  and then packing in those 18 hour days to find (a bit) more balance. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

    Buy the book: https://books.apple.com/gb/book/the-feminine-mystique/id1553757817

    Edited by Chelsey Moore

    • 38 min
    Catherine Cho on postpartum psychosis and why we need to talk about maternal mental health

    Catherine Cho on postpartum psychosis and why we need to talk about maternal mental health

    One day, when her son Cato was three months old, Catherine Cho looked at him and, instead of his eyes, she saw devil eyes. She and her husband James had taken Cato to the US from their home in London to introduce him to relatives. She grew gradually more anxious as the trip went on, before being hit by a tidal wave of postpartum psychosis, becoming convinced that she was in hell and that her son was going to die. She was sectioned.

    Inferno is her astonishing memoir about what happened next. Moving between scenes from her childhood, her romance with James, and her newly infantilised existence in a psychiatric institution, it’s powerful, raw and eye opening. I’m so grateful to Catherine for talking to me about this - as well as what it was like reliving her trauma for the book, her anxiety over having a second child, and the urgent need to open up the conversation around maternal mental health.

    Buy the book: https://www.waterstones.com/book/inferno/catherine-cho/9781526619044

    Edited by Chelsey Moore

    • 32 min
    Nell Frizzell on her 'panic years', writing as a trade not an art and opening up conversations about fertility

    Nell Frizzell on her 'panic years', writing as a trade not an art and opening up conversations about fertility

    We have a term for our teenage years - ‘adolescence’ - and we are all familiar with the ‘menopause’ - but there’s no word for the decade or so in which, arguably, women navigate more life-altering decisions than any other - their late 20s and 30s. Or at least there wasn’t, until Nell Frizzell came along and coined one: ‘the flux’, aka The Panic Years, the title of her new book. For her, these began when she was 28 and called time on the relationship that had dominated her adult life thus far. It came just as her friends started settling down and having children - something she was pretty sure she wanted too. What follows is a rollicking and smart account of her ‘panic’ years from hare-brained camping trips with dates to soul searching over the ethics of procreation in a time of global warming - to the gnarly conundrum of falling in love with a man who says he doesn’t want children yet. It’s honest and fun and thought-provoking, as was Nell herself - I hope you enjoy listening to her as much as I did.

    Buy the book: https://www.waterstones.com/book/the-panic-years/nell-frizzell/9781787632837

    Edited by Chelsey Moore

    • 47 min
    Rebecca Seal on WFH and how the pros do dinner parties

    Rebecca Seal on WFH and how the pros do dinner parties

    Still WFH? The food writer Rebecca Seal has been doing it for more than a decade. Six years ago, however, she reached something close to breaking point: working until eight or nine at night, six days a week (plus Sunday mornings, when she’s a regular on brunch TV). So she and her partner decided to change things. They set rules: no working or talking about work before breakfast; no working after 8pm; no talking about work after 8pm - and no working at weekends. They stuck to them - and things got better. Now she has written a book, Solo: How to Work Alone (and Not Lose Your Mind), about how to make WFH work for you. It’s full of brilliant advice - I loved hearing about how she has managed to cut back her hours while also being more productive, how she copes with loneliness, and also how, as a food writer, she approaches dinner parties (top tip: always test the recipe). I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

    Buy the book: https://www.waterstones.com/book/solo/rebecca-seal/9781788164856

    Edited by Chelsey Moore

    • 39 min
    Sarah Sands on her incredible career - and asking monks how they stay so cal‪m‬

    Sarah Sands on her incredible career - and asking monks how they stay so cal‪m‬

    Sarah Sands is a media industry legend. A trailblazer for women in journalism, she has had one of the most glittering careers it’s possible to have - editing two newspapers before going on to head up BBC Radio 4’s flagship current affairs programme, Today. Having left that role last year, she’d be forgiven for putting her feet up. But no - she has just published The Interior Silence: 10 Lessons from Monastic Life. The book moves between her frenetic journalism career - buzzing along on six hours sleep, dealing with endless emails, breaking news and tweets - and her quest to discover the kind of inner calm more often seen among monks and nuns. It’s a really fun, fascinating read - written in a kind of travelogue style, with bits of history, culture and monastic life interwoven with anecdotes from Sarah’s busy, high-powered professional world. I lapped it up - and absolutely loved interviewing Sarah about everything from her start in journalism, holding her own in what was then a very male-dominated environment while also being a young single mother, making it to the top as the editor of The Sunday Telegraph - only to lose her job eight months later, reaching the pinnacle again as editor of the Evening Standard and then at the Today programme - and much, much more. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

    Buy the book: https://www.waterstones.com/book/the-interior-silence/sarah-sands/9781780724546

    Twitter: @aliceazania / @sarahsands100

    Edited by Chelsey Moore

    • 45 min
    Sarra Manning on J-17, the pomodoro method and her incredible career

    Sarra Manning on J-17, the pomodoro method and her incredible career

    I’ve wanted to interview Sarra Manning since I started this podcast - for many reasons. She’s a fab writer, a huge supporter of other authors, has tonnes of brilliant writing and publishing advice (seriously, this episode features some of the most original, no-nonsense and practical tips I’ve ever had). But also: she was the brains behind J-17’s legendary Diary of a Crush. Growing up in South Africa, I was given a subscription to the seminal, feisty, feminist teen mag and I can honestly say that I don’t think I’d have been a journalist if it wasn’t for that. I was obsessed - and I loved the Diary of a Crush column and novellas. Anyway, that was a long time ago, and Sarra has had a hugely successful career in both magazines and books since then. Currently the literary editor of Red magazine, she has written over twenty five novels, both YA and adult - including, most recently, the absolutely charming rom com Rescue Me. I hope you find her as inspiring and wise as I did.

    Buy the book: https://www.waterstones.com/book/rescue-me/sarra-manning/9781529336542

    Edited by Chelsey Moore

    • 52 min

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