29 episodes

We Happy Few is a podcast created by a veteran, for veterans and it explores the complexities of what military service means through the stories of veterans, their families and their friends.

The stories span all types of experience, from the monotony of training to the long-term impact of combat to the difficulty in adjusting to civilian life, as well as the challenges families face when one member volunteers to serve in the armed forces. The podcast is hosted by Air Force and Army National Guard veteran Jason Comstock. He offers veterans the chance to tell their stories in hopes of creating an understanding of just how complex and nuanced the issues facing veterans, especially in this modern era, are. With less than 3 percent of the population serving in the military today, it is critical that civilians understand what it means to "thank" a veteran for his or her service.

The Loudmouth project is proud to offer veterans and their families this opportunity to tell their stories and help create a new, more effective system of support.

We Happy Few The Loudmouth Project

    • Mental Health

We Happy Few is a podcast created by a veteran, for veterans and it explores the complexities of what military service means through the stories of veterans, their families and their friends.

The stories span all types of experience, from the monotony of training to the long-term impact of combat to the difficulty in adjusting to civilian life, as well as the challenges families face when one member volunteers to serve in the armed forces. The podcast is hosted by Air Force and Army National Guard veteran Jason Comstock. He offers veterans the chance to tell their stories in hopes of creating an understanding of just how complex and nuanced the issues facing veterans, especially in this modern era, are. With less than 3 percent of the population serving in the military today, it is critical that civilians understand what it means to "thank" a veteran for his or her service.

The Loudmouth project is proud to offer veterans and their families this opportunity to tell their stories and help create a new, more effective system of support.

    Twice a veteran - from enlisted to officer

    Twice a veteran - from enlisted to officer

    David Moss started his military career in the Idaho Army National Guard and wanted to serve until he could retire. Always outspoken, Dave had a run in a 1st Sergeant and ended his career after 10 years of service. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Dave wanted to serve in the military again, but he knew this time it would be as an officer. Dave served in Iraq and after returning home got a job as an active guard member in Alaska. However once again his dream of serving until retirement ended with he was determined not longer medically able to serve in the Army. He talks about fulfilling a dream of serving in the military and the realities of life after service.

    • 32 min
    Telling Veterans Stories: Filmmaker Zane O'Gwin

    Telling Veterans Stories: Filmmaker Zane O'Gwin

    When an opportunity to capture a historical parachute jump into Normandy on the 75th anniversary, Utah filmmaker Zane O'Gwin knew he wanted to be part of it. He quickly learned there was more to the story than the decision of a group of veterans to try and honor World War II veterans who parachuted into France as part of the Normandy invasion by the allied troops.

    From telling the story of a Gold Star mom to the many others that each participated for their own reasons, Zane and his team capture those and many more. 
    Here Am I, Send Me is available for free on YouTube.

    Here is a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUuL5ksxPT0&t=2051s

    • 35 min
    From a dairy farm to caring for animals in the U.S. Army

    From a dairy farm to caring for animals in the U.S. Army

    Growing up Casey Talbot always thought he'd be an Idaho dairy farmer, even though he also dreamed about serving his country as a soldier. After going to school to study veterinary medicine he got a job in Fairgrove, Missouri, where a colleague was preparing to leave on an Army deployment. Shortly after that, circumstances in his life allowed the father of five to reconsider military service. He joined the Army and has had the chance to work with the Army's working dogs, as well as a number of other aspects of service that might surprise some. Capt. Talbot discusses how his service has changed him and how the animals he treats deal with some of the same issues as our dedicated soldiers. 

    • 31 min
    A Marine's Wife

    A Marine's Wife

    As a newlywed in 1968, the last thing Jean Donaldson expected was for her husband of five months to come home from a trip to Salt Lake City with news that he was leaving college to join the U.S. Marine Corps. She was five months pregnant with their first child (who happens to be Loudmouth's own Amy Donaldson) when he enlisted, and she delivered their second child as he slept in field in Vietnam on Christmas Eve 1969. 

    She talks about how the Marines gave her husband, Dan, purpose and direction, as he'd struggled most of his life with losing his father at age 13. She talks about how she found out he'd been wounded, and what it was like to work with veterans when she became a community mental health specialist in her 50s.

    Check out this article that Amy wrote for the Deseret News about running with her Mom:  https://www.deseret.com/2016/10/23/20598898/amy-donaldson-running-ragnar-hawaii-with-my-69-year-old-mother-offers-lessons-in-perseverance#a-post-race-selfie-with-from-left-to-right-my-mom-jean-donaldson-69-sisters-michelyn-pylilo-46-and-loralee-faucheux-38-and-amy-donaldson-48  

    And check out this episode of We Happy Few with Dan Donaldson:

    https://loudmouthproject.com/semper-fi-understanding-the-marine-who-raised-me/  

    • 32 min
    What does the Oath of Enlistment mean?

    What does the Oath of Enlistment mean?

    The Oath of Enlistment is something all branches of the military have in common. In this special Veterans Day episode, we invited service members and their families to share their thoughts on what the oath means in their lives. Those who share their feelings are: Keimon Dixson, Krista Palmer, Josh Hanson, Marcy Henly, Ninzel Rassmuson, Layne Morris, Maj. Gen. Stacey Hawkins, Fred Tapia, Dan Bucio, Arlo Doyle, and Amy Alleman. The Oath is more than a promise to most service members, and the commitment made doesn't end when they leave military service. And while service members swear the Oath, their families also learn they are part of honoring that pledge. It is a guiding light and constant reminder of what binds us together as Americans.

    I, (state name of enlistee), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. (So help me God)."

    (The oath for officers is slightly different.)

    • 16 min
    Finding family in 'the suck'

    Finding family in 'the suck'

    Sgt. Mike Hendry joined the U.S. Army after deciding college wasn't the path for him. He gravitated to the grittiest assignments and found purpose alongside his brothers in the 82nd Airborne and 10th Mountain Division (light infantry) for "six years and 16 weeks to the day." He served in both Iraq and Afghanistan in two different deployments, and in this episode he talks about serving in Iraq and how his service transformed the man he is today.

    • 37 min

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